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V70XC AWD Front Control Arm Replacement
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

V70XC AWD Front Control Arm Replacement

Nick Czerula

Time:

3 hours3 hrs

Tab:

$300

Talent:

***

Tools:

Set of sockets and wrenches 15, 16, 17, 18mm, floor jack, jack stands, wheel chocks, safety glasses, torque wrench, lug wrench

Applicable Models:

Volvo V70 (1998-01)
Volvo V70 2.4T (2001)
Volvo V70 AWD (1998-99)
Volvo V70 GLT (1998-00)
Volvo V70 GLT SE (2000)
Volvo V70 R (1998)
Volvo V70 R AWD (1999-00)
Volvo V70 T5 (1998-01)
Volvo V70 X/C (2001)
Volvo V70 X/C AWD (1998-00)
Volvo V70 X/C AWD SE (2000)

Parts Required:

Front control arm, self-locking nuts for ball joints

Hot Tip:

Clean bushing bolt threads before loosening

Performance Gain:

Replace faulty control arm

Complementary Modification:

Inspect with each oil change

Volvo V70XC All-wheel drive (AWD) vehicle suspensions are comprised of a MacPherson strut and a lower control arm. The suspension features a single-pivot design with one lower control arm and a MacPherson strut. The steering knuckle is attached to the control arm using a ball joint. The inboard end of the control arm attaches to the front subframe using bushings inside of mounting brackets.

With age and use, each end of each control arm may become worn and loose. Check ball joints and bushings for looseness by jacking the front of your vehicle and moving the wheel side to side. If you feel looseness at any of the attachment points, this indicates a problem. You may need help from a friend to watch the control arm components while you wiggle the wheel. The bushing(s) can dry rot and wear out. If you see or feel signs of wear in a bushing, replace it. A bad bushing may also give you a vibration in the front end.

In this article I will show you how to remove the front control arm.

Keep in mind that when your car was serviced before, parts may have been replaced with different size fasteners used in the replacement. The sizes of the nuts and bolts we give may be different from what you have, so be prepared with different size sockets and wrenches.

Protect your eyes, hands and body from fluids, dust and debris while working on your vehicle. If you're working with the electrical system, disconnect the battery before beginning. Always catch fluids in appropriate containers and properly dispose of any fluid waste. Recycle parts, packaging and fluids when possible. Do not work on your vehicle if you feel the task is beyond your ability.

Vehicle models change and evolve, as they grow older, so the vehicle shown in our illustrations may vary slightly from yours. If something seems different, let us know and share your info to help other users. Do you have questions or want to add to the article? Leave a comment below. When leaving a comment, please leave your vehicle information.

Raise and support the front of the vehicle on jack stands. See our tech article on jacking up your vehicle. You're going to want both wheels off the ground.

Remove the front wheel from the side of the vehicle you are replacing the control arm on.

The front control arm is the lower front suspension link (yellow arrow).
Figure 1

The front control arm is the lower front suspension link (yellow arrow). The steering knuckle is attached to the control arm using a ball joint (red arrow). The inboard end of the control arm attaches to the front subframe using bushings (green arrows).

Start by removing the ball joint pinch bolt.
Figure 2

Start by removing the ball joint pinch bolt. The ball joints on V70 models are not an interference fit. You do not need a pickle fork to remove them. Working at the steering knuckle, remove the 15mm ball joint nut (green arrow) while counter-holding the 17mm bolt (red arrow).

Remove the ball joint from the steering knuckle by pulling the control arm straight down.
Figure 3

Remove the ball joint from the steering knuckle by pulling the control arm straight down. If the ball joint is stuck, it could be due to corrosion. If needed, lever the ball out of the steering knuckle using a pry bar (green arrow). You can free it, then leave the ball joint stud in place until the bushings are removed.

Next, working at the subframe, clean the bushing bolt ends using a wire brush.
Figure 4

Next, working at the subframe, clean the bushing bolt ends using a wire brush. Then spray the threads with penetrating oil (red arrows).

Next, working at the subframe, remove the rear control arm bushing 17mm bolts (red arrows).
Figure 5

Next, working at the subframe, remove the rear control arm bushing 17mm bolts (red arrows).

For the front bolt you can remove it with a ratchet.
Figure 6

For the front bolt you can remove it with a ratchet. Note the corrosion on the bolt (inset). If your bolts give you a hard time coming out, be sure the threads are in good shape before reinstalling them. Replace them if necessary.

For the remaining bolts, use a wrench (green arrow) to remove them.
Figure 7

For the remaining bolts, use a wrench (green arrow) to remove them. The front inner (red arrow) may have to stay in if the transmission interferes with removal. Remove the control arm from the subframe by pulling it down (yellow arrow). As you pull the bushing brackets out, remove the ball joint from the steering. Then remove the control arm from the vehicle. When installing the new control arm, first, install the bushings into the subframe. Then install the ball joint with no fastener. Then install the bushing fasteners and tighten. Then install and tighten the ball joint fastener. NOTE: If having clearance issues, remove the motor or trans mount fasteners and jack engine enough to access fasteners. 


If you have uneven tire wear, have your vehicle professionally aligned.

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Comments and Suggestions:
mcintorb Comments: Very helpful description, but to broaden the scope to both sides you would have to add that to remove bolts or even get to some engine/transmission has to be raised which means disconnecting the right lower and forward hydraulic engine mounts, and also the transmission torque mount. Torque specs on the ball joint and chassis mount bolts would have helped also, but I didn't get that far.
August 7, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I'll add some notes for the clearance issues with the trans.

I don;t have torque info, that is best found in the factory repair info. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 

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