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Spark Plug Coil Replacement
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

Spark Plug Coil Replacement

Kerry Jonsson

Time:

1 hour1 hr

Tab:

$50 to $250

Talent:

**

Tools:

T30 Torx socket, 5/8 spark plug socket, 10mm socket and ratchet

Applicable Models:

Volvo V70 (1998-03)
Volvo V70 2.4 (2004-07)
Volvo V70 2.4T (2001-03)
Volvo V70 2.5T (2004-07)
Volvo V70 2.5T AWD (2004)
Volvo V70 AWD (1998-03)
Volvo V70 GLT (1998-00)
Volvo V70 GLT SE (2000)
Volvo V70 R (1998-07)
Volvo V70 R AWD (1999-00)
Volvo V70 T5 (1998-05)
Volvo V70 X/C (2001-02)
Volvo V70 X/C AWD (1998-00)
Volvo V70 X/C AWD SE (2000)

Parts Required:

Spark plugs, Ignitions coils

Hot Tip:

Work with a cool engine.

Performance Gain:

Engine runs well

Complementary Modification:

Change air filter at same time

Replacing the spark plugs on your Volvo V70 is part of routine maintenance. Volvo recommends replacing the spark plugs on V70 models every 30,000 miles. With all the major engine design changes over the years, spark plugs now last up to twice as long as they did in years past. This is good and bad. It means you save money and time not having to service them so frequently, but run the risk of a spark plug seizing in the cylinder head. I suggest replacing your spark plugs every three years regardless of mileage. If the last time they were serviced is unknown, replace them right away.

When servicing your spark plugs, be sure the engine is cool and leave yourself about an hour to do the job. Be careful not to drop a spark plug, if you do, replace it. The spark plug insulator can crack and can lead to an engine misfire.

First you are going to have to remove the engine covers on cylinder head.
Figure 1

First you are going to have to remove the engine covers on cylinder head. Start by removing the eight T30 Torx bolts (green arrows). Once bolts are removed, there are two clips you have to detach. See step 3 for detailed information.

The Torx bolts that hold the engine covers can be troublesome, especially on older vehicle.
Figure 2

The Torx bolts that hold the engine covers can be troublesome, especially on older vehicle. The heads become rusty and they are frequently over-tightened. If you find a fastener is stuck or stripped, use an Allen bit about the same size as the Torx hole (depending on how stripped it is) and hammer it in. Once it is tight, break it free with a quick motion. When tightening them, do not over-tighten, just snug them up.

Once the Torx fasteners have been removed, unclip the timing belt cover retainers.
Figure 3

Once the Torx fasteners have been removed, unclip the timing belt cover retainers. Pull them away from cover while lifting cover up.

Once unclipped, lift timing belt cover up and remove from engine.
Figure 4

Once unclipped, lift timing belt cover up and remove from engine.

Then remove cylinder head cover from cylinder head.
Figure 5

Then remove cylinder head cover from cylinder head.

Volvo V70 models utilize an individual ignition coil for each spark plug, referred to as coil over plug.
Figure 6

Volvo V70 models utilize an individual ignition coil for each spark plug, referred to as coil over plug. This is helpful when trying to diagnose a faulty ignition coil. You have five coils that can be swapped cylinder to cylinder to see if one is faulty. For example, if cylinder #1 is misfiring and you suspect the coil. Swap a coil from another cylinder to cylinder #1, if the misfire follows the new location or the original coil from cylinder #1, it is faulty.

Press release tab on ignition coil electrical connector and remove by pulling straight out.
Figure 7

Press release tab on ignition coil electrical connector and remove by pulling straight out.

Remove the 10mm ignition coil fastener (green arrow).
Figure 8

Remove the 10mm ignition coil fastener (green arrow).

Slide the ignition coil up and out of the cylinder head to remove.
Figure 9

Slide the ignition coil up and out of the cylinder head to remove. If you find engine oil has contaminated the ignition coil boot you will have to repair the oil leak and replace ignition coil. The source of the oil leak will likely be the valve cover gasket.

I like to use a long 5/8 thin-wall spark plug socket on a 6
Figure 10

I like to use a long 5/8 thin-wall spark plug socket on a 6" extension to remove the spark plug from cylinder head.

Using a ratchet and the spark plug socket, loosen the spark plug, then remove it from the engine.
Figure 11

Using a ratchet and the spark plug socket, loosen the spark plug, then remove it from the engine. Adjust spark plug gap is needed. The gap on my vehicle model year was: Turbocharged engine: 0.028-0.032 in (0.7: 0.8 mm). Normally-aspirated engine: 0.028-0.032 in (0.7: 0.8 mm). Check your vehicle specific information for the correct spark plug gap. Lightly lubricate new spark plugs with copper based anti-seize. Thread spark plugs into cylinder head by hand, this will prevent accidental cross-threading. Torque spark plugs to 25 Nm (18 ft-lb). Reinstall ignition coils and reconnect electrical connectors. Be sure to route wiring harness as it was before and connect ignition coil grounds. Install engine covers and check your work.

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Comments and Suggestions:
nybill Comments: Thanks very helpful pics and info about ignition coils, Now that I know I can access the plugs easy will attempt my self.
October 1, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the feedback. Glad we could help.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 

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