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Replacing Radiator Hoses
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

Replacing Radiator Hoses

Jared Fenton

Time:

3 hours3 hrs

Tab:

$20 to $60

Talent:

****

Tools:

Flathead screwdriver, large drain pan

Applicable Models:

Volvo C30 T5 (2008-13)
Volvo C30 T5 R-Design (2008-13)

Parts Required:

Radiator hoses

Hot Tip:

Drain the cooling system and disconnect the battery

Performance Gain:

Better cooling

Complementary Modification:

Replace thermostat

Over time, radiator hoses can crack and develop weak spots due to both pressure and temperature. It is a good idea to periodically inspect both hoses for wear. A blown radiator hose can leave you stranded. Taking five minutes with a flashlight can save you hundreds in towing and repair costs.

I recommend inspecting your radiator hoses once a year. As they age, they have a tendency to get hard and brittle. When you gently squeeze a hose, it should be relatively soft and easy to indent with your hand. It shouldn't feel like its brittle or crunching when you squeeze it. It should spring back to its original shape pretty quickly after being compressed. If it feels very hard, it might be time to replace it. If there is a bulge in the hose, or any type of crack in the surface of the hose, you should replace it as well. Also check for wetness or leaks around where the hoses create their connections: that is a sign that the hose should be replaced. Some hoses may be coated with some leftover Cosmoline from the factory. This is a yellowish, semi-hard film that acts as a protectant. Don't mistake this for bad radiator hoses.

Replacing the radiator hoses requires draining the coolant from the engine. Additionally, you will need to bleed the cooling system of all air prior to adding new coolant. See our article on Coolant Flush and Replacement for more information. You'll also need to remove the upper intake tube, radiator fan and the air filter housing for access. See our articles on Air Filter Housing Removal, Radiator Fan Removal and Spark Plug and Coil Pack Replacement for more information.

Begin by loosening the 10mm nut (green arrow) that holds the connector to the negative post on the battery.
Figure 1

Begin by loosening the 10mm nut (green arrow) that holds the connector to the negative post on the battery. We will be working around the starter and it is likely you'll spill a small amount of coolant on it. See our article on Battery Replacement for more information.

Jack up the front of your C30 and locate the radiator drain plug on the right hand side near the bottom (green arrow).
Figure 2

Jack up the front of your C30 and locate the radiator drain plug on the right hand side near the bottom (green arrow). Unscrew the drain plug and let the coolant completely drain from the radiator into a drain pan that's large enough to accommodate all of the used coolant/water.

Now move to the rear of the oil pan and locate the oil cooler.
Figure 3

Now move to the rear of the oil pan and locate the oil cooler. Loosen the hose clamp (green arrow) on the coolant line and pull it off. This will drain all the coolant from the engine block. See our article on Coolant Flush and Replacement for more information.

Shown here is the thermostat housing which sits under the lower intake manifold and above the starter.
Figure 4

Shown here is the thermostat housing which sits under the lower intake manifold and above the starter. ThisPicture shows the housing with both the manifold and starter removed for clarity. Use a flathead screwdriver to loosen the hose clamp (green arrow) holding the radiator hose to the housing and pull it off. Be prepared for a little coolant to spill out.

Follow the lower radiator hose (yellow arrow) down to the connection at the radiator.
Figure 5

Follow the lower radiator hose (yellow arrow) down to the connection at the radiator. Loosen the hose clamp (green arrow) holding the hose to the radiator. Once loose, pull the hose off the radiator. Depending on how old the hose is, you may need to cut it down the center and peel the hose off. At this point, install the new left side radiator hose.

Return to the thermostat housing and locate the hose to the right.
Figure 6

Return to the thermostat housing and locate the hose to the right. This is held on the housing with another hose clamp (green arrow). Loosen the hose clamp and pull the hose off the housing. This hose is part of the other radiator hose.

Follow the hose down to the connection at the radiator on the right side.
Figure 7

Follow the hose down to the connection at the radiator on the right side. Loosen the hose clamp (green arrow) and pull the hose off. As before, it may be a little difficult to remove it.

Follow the radiator hose (green arrow) up towards the engine.
Figure 8

Follow the radiator hose (green arrow) up towards the engine. The upper hose connection (yellow arrow) is a bit difficult to photograph due to the various connectors around the area.

In thisPicture, you can just see the head of the hose clamp (green arrow).
Figure 9

In thisPicture, you can just see the head of the hose clamp (green arrow). Loosen the clamp and remove the hose. At this point, you are ready to install all the new hoses.

You'll need to use a vacuum bleeder as shown here to purge the cooling system of air.
Figure 10

You'll need to use a vacuum bleeder as shown here to purge the cooling system of air. Follow the directions of whichever bleeder you use. For more information, see our article on Coolant Flush and Replacement.



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