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Fuel Injector Replacement
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

Fuel Injector Replacement

Jared Fenton

Time:

3 hours3 hrs

Tab:

$55 to $380

Talent:

****

Tools:

T10/T20/T30 Torx drivers

Applicable Models:

Volvo C30 T5 (2008-13)
Volvo C30 T5 R-Design (2008-13)

Parts Required:

Fuel injector, Fuel pressure sensor

Hot Tip:

Check that the old o-rings are not left behind in the lower plenum

Performance Gain:

Smoother running

Complementary Modification:

Replace fuel filter

Is your car running sluggishly? Are you noticing a slight stumble as you drive? Chances are, your fuel injectors need to be cleaned. In this tech article, I will go over the steps in removing the fuel injectors and cleaning them out. This article applies to the Volvo C30, however the principles behind this apply to nearly every car in general. Usually, most people just run a can of fuel injector cleaner in a full tank of gas. I would also recommend this, but in cases of cars that have been poorly maintained or have been sitting for a while, the only way to get those injectors truly clean is to pull them out and have them ultrasonically cleaned by a professional.

One of the nice features of the C30 is the ODB2 system. This typically will throw a check engine light (CEL) in the event of an actual injector failure. Once you get a CEL, you'll want to use a code reader to extract the diagnostic trouble code (DTC) stored in the computer. Typically, this manifests as a P0201 thru P0205 code. For example, a P0204 code would indicate a problem with injector number 4.'

Begin by removing the air filter housing and upper intake plenum. The injector rail is directly below. See our articles on Air Filter Housing Removal and Upper Intake Plenum Removal for more information. '

Keep in mind that you will be working around raw fuel. It's a good idea to have a fire extinguisher nearby. Better safe than sorry. You'll also need to relieve the fuel pressure built up in the fuel rail, otherwise, you'll get a pressurized blast of fuel all over the place when you disconnect the feed line to the rail.'

There are two methods you can use to relieve the fuel pressure built up in the rail. One involves removing the fuel pump fuses from the fuse box, then running the car until the engine dies. This method has the advantage of using up all the fuel in the rail; however, it may trigger a DTC indicating a failure in the fuel pump circuit. If you start the car and the CEL comes on, the DTC stored in the computer will need to be read and then cleared from the computer.'

The other method of relieving pressure is removing the plastic caps from the end of the fuel rail and pressing the Schrader valve inside. This method will not trigger a DTC, however you will have to hold a rag in front of the valve to catch the fuel escaping. You'll also need to drain the fuel rail of all the gasoline inside. Summed up, if you have a diagnostic scanner, use the fuse method. If not, use the valve on the end of the fuel rail.'

You'll need to disable the fuel pump prior to removing the fuel injectors.
Figure 1

You'll need to disable the fuel pump prior to removing the fuel injectors. The idea here is to start the car and let it run until it dies. This will bleed off the fuel pressure inside the fuel rail. Under the glove box is the panel that covers the fuse box. Pull out the two plastic pins (green arrows) holding the felt panel in place and remove it from the car.

Twist the two locking tabs (green arrows) counter clockwise.
Figure 2

Twist the two locking tabs (green arrows) counter clockwise.

Now lower the fuse panel down and slightly back.
Figure 3

Now lower the fuse panel down and slightly back. The panel itself is hinged at the back to allow you easy access.

Remove fuse number 74 (green arrows) from the fuse panel and start the engine.
Figure 4

Remove fuse number 74 (green arrows) from the fuse panel and start the engine. Let the car run until it dies. This will bleed off the pressure in the fuel rail.

The other method of bleeding off the fuel pressure involves using the Schrader valve on the end of the fuel rail.
Figure 5

The other method of bleeding off the fuel pressure involves using the Schrader valve on the end of the fuel rail. Unscrew the cap (green arrow) and use a small screwdriver to press in the valve while holding a rag close by to catch the gasoline that sprays out.

Press the tabs on each electrical connector going to the fuel injectors (green arrows) and pull them off.
Figure 6

Press the tabs on each electrical connector going to the fuel injectors (green arrows) and pull them off. Pull the locking tab off the electrical connector going to the fuel pressure sensor (yellow arrow) and pull it off as well. You may also want to stuff clean shop rags or paper towels down each runner on the intake plenum to keep dirt and debris out.

Loosen and remove the 10mm bolt (green arrow) holding the fuel supply line to the cylinder head.
Figure 7

Loosen and remove the 10mm bolt (green arrow) holding the fuel supply line to the cylinder head. This gives you a little better access when removing the line from the fuel rail.

Loosen and remove the three T30 Torx screws (green arrows) holding the support piece and fuel rail to the lower intake manifold.
Figure 8

Loosen and remove the three T30 Torx screws (green arrows) holding the support piece and fuel rail to the lower intake manifold. Also loosen the T10 Torx screw holding the clamp on the fuel supply line (yellow arrow). You just need to back it off, not remove it. Carefully pull up on the fuel rail and each injector will pop out of the manifold. Check for any O-rings that may be stuck in each injector bore.

Pull the locking tab (yellow arrow) on the side of the fuel supply line locking clamp and lift it up and off the fuel rail.
Figure 9

Pull the locking tab (yellow arrow) on the side of the fuel supply line locking clamp and lift it up and off the fuel rail. You can now pull the fuel supply line (green arrow) out of the fuel rail. Be prepared for fuel to spill out. You'll also need to let the fuel rail drain out any residual gasoline inside.

If you need to replace the fuel pressure sensor on the end of the fuel rail (green arrow), loosen and remove the T20 Torx screw (yellow arrow) holding it on and pull the sensor off.
Figure 10

If you need to replace the fuel pressure sensor on the end of the fuel rail (green arrow), loosen and remove the T20 Torx screw (yellow arrow) holding it on and pull the sensor off.

The injectors are secured to the fuel rail with a metal retaining plate.
Figure 11

The injectors are secured to the fuel rail with a metal retaining plate. Loosen and remove the three T20 Torx screws (green arrows) securing the plate to the rail.

Now carefully lift the retaining plate (green arrow) up and off the injector rail.
Figure 12

Now carefully lift the retaining plate (green arrow) up and off the injector rail. You can now pull each injector (yellow arrow) out of the fuel rail.

Also check the inside of the fuel rail bores for any old O-rings that may be stuck inside as shown here (green arrow).
Figure 13

Also check the inside of the fuel rail bores for any old O-rings that may be stuck inside as shown here (green arrow). Use a small pick to pull them out. At this point, you're ready to take the injectors to be cleaned or install new ones.

It is important to replace the O-rings (green arrows) when putting the injectors back into the fuel rail and manifold.
Figure 14

It is important to replace the O-rings (green arrows) when putting the injectors back into the fuel rail and manifold. I've found that a VERY small dab of silicone grease on each O-ring makes this a little easier. Now reassemble and reinstall the fuel rail and you're done.


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