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Pelican Technical Article:

Clutch Replacement

Jared Fenton

Time:

8 hours8 hrs

Tab:

$300 to $400

Talent:

*****

Tools:

All of them, floor jack, jack stands, wheel chocks, safety glasses, torque wrench

Applicable Models:

VW Jetta GL (1999-05)
VW Jetta GLS (1999-05)
VW Jetta Wolfsburg (1999)

Parts Required:

Clutch

Hot Tip:

Take your time, it can get daunting

Performance Gain:

Working car again

Complementary Modification:

Replace transmission input shaft seal

One of the most common repair procedures for the Mk4 Jetta 2.0 is the replacement of the clutch assembly. Unfortunately, it is a rather big process involving the removal of the transmission and other items. The good news is that it's really not a super-difficult job if you have some information and a few hints and tips. Disconnect the battery before you begin, as we will be working around the starter.

Before beginning, please see our articles on the following items. Most of these items will need to be removed to gain access to the clutch.

Jacking up your Mk4 Jetta

Battery Replacement

Airbox Removal

Battery Box Removal

Transmission Removal

Axle Assembly Replacement

Starter Replacement

MAF Replacement

Once the transmission is removed, use a twelve-point 8mm wrench to remove the six bolts (green arrows) holding the pressure plate to the flywheel.
Figure 1

Once the transmission is removed, use a twelve-point 8mm wrench to remove the six bolts (green arrows) holding the pressure plate to the flywheel. The clutch disc is sandwiched between these two components. Don't be surprised if a lot of clutch material pours out as dust. Remove the old pressure plate and clutch disc.

You'll need to lock the flywheel to keep the engine from turning when you loosen the pressure plate bolts.
Figure 2

You'll need to lock the flywheel to keep the engine from turning when you loosen the pressure plate bolts. VW recommends using tool number 3067 to do this. In a pinch, I found that I was able to wedge my pry bar in one of the flywheel gear teeth and the floor. This allowed me to remove the bolts (yellow arrow).

This picture shows the clutch disc and pressure plate removed from the engine.
Figure 3

This picture shows the clutch disc and pressure plate removed from the engine. You can see the heat glazing on the pressure plate (yellow arrow). Over time, the clutch disc impregnates the friction surface with dust. Over time, this eventually leads to a slipping clutch. Also take note of the splined portion of the clutch disc (green arrow). This part of the clutch disc slides onto the transmission input shaft and allows the clutch disc to slide when operating the clutch. 

Shown here is the flywheel.
Figure 4

Shown here is the flywheel. Note the glazing (green arrow) along the surface of the flywheel. This is due to heat and/or abuse of the clutch. You'll need the flywheel to have a clean surface for the new clutch disc. This is called resurfacing. The flywheel is setup on a milling machine or lathe that machines down the old flywheel to remove the glazing. Often times, a flywheel is too far worndown to be machined. In this case, you'll need to purchase a new one. See our article on Flywheel Replacement for more information.

Your clutch kit should come with a clutch alignment tool.
Figure 5

Your clutch kit should come with a clutch alignment tool. This centers the clutch disc into the flywheel when installing the pressure plate. Fit the clutch alignment tool into the new clutch disc (green arrow), taking note of any writing on the clutch disc. Typically, there will be a label saying "gearbox side" or "getriebeseite". This side must face the transmission. Now fit the clutch disc onto the flywheel. The tool will center the disc while you install the new pressure plate. Torque the bolts to 13Nm (9 ft./lbs.) for two part flywheels and 20Nm (14 ft./lbs.) for single piece flywheels.

Inside the transmission is the throwout bearing (yellow arrow).
Figure 6

Inside the transmission is the throwout bearing (yellow arrow). This bearing is used to "press" against the pressure plate when the clutch is disengaged. It sits on the throwout arm (green arrow). I recommend removing the throwout arm to clean and lubricate the ball pivot behind it.

Note the clip at the bottom of the throwout arm (green arrow).
Figure 7

Note the clip at the bottom of the throwout arm (green arrow). You'll need to pry this down with a screwdriver to release the throwout arm from the ball pivot behind it. 

This picture shows the backside of the throwout arm and how the clip (green arrow) secures the arm to the ball pivot (yellow arrow).
Figure 8

This picture shows the backside of the throwout arm and how the clip (green arrow) secures the arm to the ball pivot (yellow arrow). I recommend putting a dab of grease on the ball pivot. Once ready, pop the throwout arm over the ball pivot and make sure the clip is over the ball pivot.

Note the clips on the backside of the throwout arm (green arrows).
Figure 9

Note the clips on the backside of the throwout arm (green arrows). These hold the throwout bearing in place. Simply pop the old one out and the new one in. At this point, you are now ready to re-install the transmission.


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