Volkswagen Parts Catalog Volkswagen Accessories Catalog Volkswagen Tech Information Volkswagen Tech Forums
 
Follow Pelican Parts on Facebook Follow Pelican Parts on Twitter Follow Pelican Parts on Instagram Follow Pelican Parts on YouTube Follow Pelican Parts on Pinterest Follow Pelican Parts on Tumblr
  Search our site:    
View Recent Cars  |   Cart  | Project List | Order Status | Help    
 >  >
Fuel Rail Pressure Sensor Replacement
 
Bookmark and Share

Pelican Technical Article:

Fuel Rail Pressure Sensor Replacement

Steve Vernon

Time:

45 minutes45 mins

Tab:

$75

Talent:

*

Tools:

27mm wrench or deep socket

Applicable Models:

VW GTI (2006-09)

Parts Required:

New fuel rail pressure sensor

Hot Tip:

Work on a cold engine

Performance Gain:

Car runs like normal again

Complementary Modification:

Replace fuel injectors

The Volkswagen GTI MkV has two separate fuel pumps; one in the tank and a high pressure pump mounted on the cylinder head and driven by the camshaft. The fuel system also has three pressure sensors. There is a lower pressure sensor for the line supplying fuel to the high pressure pump, a sensor in the high pressure pump itself and also a fuel rail pressure sensor. This article will go over the steps for replacing the fuel rail pressure sensor. Please see our articles on replacing the other sensors for help with those.

Your going to be working on the fuel system so be prepared: Work in a well ventilated area. Keep a fire extinguisher near you at all times and know how to use it correctly. No sparks or open flame around and if you smoke now would be a really good time to quit: at least for the hour it might take you to perform this job.

Just as with the fuel filter, injectors, or any other component of the fuel system, it's best to relieve the fuel system of any pressure before you go opening it up. The engine should be cold while doing this so open the gas cap while the motor is cooling down and help relieve the vacuum in the system. Also, be sure to use some protective gloves and goggles whenever you're working with fuel.

If you do not have an after market air induction system you will need to remove the engine cover.
Figure 1

If you do not have an after market air induction system you will need to remove the engine cover. Please see our article on engine cover removal for additional assistance.

You are going to want to run the fuel out of the system.
Figure 2

You are going to want to run the fuel out of the system. Begin by opening the access panel on the left side of the dash by using a trim removal tool and gently prying the panel out from the dash (red arrow).

Use the fuse removal tool on the back of the panel and remove the fuse for the fuel pump (red arrow).
Figure 3

Use the fuse removal tool on the back of the panel and remove the fuse for the fuel pump (red arrow). Make sure to check with your owners manual to locate the proper fuse. With the fuse removed try to start the engine; if it does start it will die quickly from fuel starvation. Usually a couple turns of the key will do it.

There is a Schrader valve located on the pump housing (red arrow).
Figure 4

There is a Schrader valve located on the pump housing (red arrow). You can unscrew the cap and use the valve to relieve any residual pressure. Have a rag or cloth handy to catch whatever remaining fuel that will come out.

The fuel rail sensor is very difficult to get at and hard to see.
Figure 5

The fuel rail sensor is very difficult to get at and hard to see. It is located between the number 1 and 2 intake runners and is below the manifold (red arrow).

Looking directly down between the intake runners you can see the sensor (red arrow).
Figure 6

Looking directly down between the intake runners you can see the sensor (red arrow). Note; the manifold is off the car to get betterPictures.

Removing the water tube mount and dip stick can improve access.
Figure 7

Removing the water tube mount and dip stick can improve access. Pull the dip stick out (red arrow) and remove the two 10mm nuts (yellow arrows). You can now move the lines and mount out of the way.

I have removed the manifold from the car and turned it over because it is impossible to get aPicture of the sensor with the manifold in the car.
Figure 8

I have removed the manifold from the car and turned it over because it is impossible to get aPicture of the sensor with the manifold in the car. Depending on how the sensor was screwed on removing the wiring connection can be one of the hardest parts of the job. Squeeze in the back of the clip (red arrow) and pull it straight back and off.

Still looking under the intake manifold you can see the sensor (red arrow) with the wiring connection off.
Figure 9

Still looking under the intake manifold you can see the sensor (red arrow) with the wiring connection off. You can approach removal by coming in with a ratchet wrench from the alternator side (yellow arrow) or use a deep socket 27mm directly over the sensor and connection (green arrow).

This photo illustrates the new sensor (red arrow).
Figure 10

This photo illustrates the new sensor (red arrow). Installation is the reverse of removal.

Bookmark and Share
Comments and Suggestions:
MkVGTI Comments: Hi, truly appreciate this writeup but I'm confused. Are you able to remove this sensor without taking off the intake manifold? Since you took it off for pictures, I am not sure of that. I have the same 2008 VW GTI and everything matches the pictures. Thank you.
August 11, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Yes you can, follow the steps to get the parts out of the way needed for access. Then work under the intake to remove it. - Nick at Pelican Parts  

  Search our site:    

View Cart & CheckOut | Project List | Order Status |  Help    

 

[Home] [Customer Service] [Shopping Cart] [Project/Wish List]
  [Privacy Statement]  [Contact Us] [About Us] [Shipping] [Careers]

Copyright © Pelican Parts Inc. -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page

Page last updated: Sat 12/3/2016 02:37:39 AM