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Pelican Technical Article:

Intake Manifold Removal

Steve Vernon

Time:

3 hours3 hrs

Tab:

$15 to $75

Talent:

***

Tools:

T30 Torx, 10mm, 13mm, 14mm, 17mm wrench, 5mm triple square, 19mm twelve point socket and driver

Applicable Models:

VW GTI (2006-09)

Parts Required:

New manifold gasket, new injector seals

Hot Tip:

Clean around the manifold ports before beginning

Performance Gain:

Car runs like normal again

Complementary Modification:

Replace fuel injector seals

There are many reasons why you will need to remove the manifold from the GTI MkV and one of the big ones will be to service the injectors or clean the intake valves. The direct port injection motors do not have fuel passing over the intake valves to keep them clean and have a reputation of building up a lot of deposits on the valves.

Your going to be working on the fuel system so be prepared: Work in a well ventilated area. Keep a fire extinguisher near you at all times and know how to use it correctly. No sparks or open flame around and if you smoke now would be a really good time to quit: at least for the two hours it might take you to perform this job.

Just as with the fuel filter, injectors, or any other component of the fuel system, it's best to relieve the fuel system of any pressure before you go opening it up. The engine should be cold while doing this so open the gas cap while the motor is cooling down and help relieve the vacuum in the system. Also, be sure to use some protective gloves and goggles whenever you're working with fuel.

If you do not have an after market air induction system you will need to remove the engine cover.
Figure 1

If you do not have an after market air induction system you will need to remove the engine cover. Please see our article on engine cover removal for additional assistance. You will also need to remove the throttle body. Please see our article on throttle body removal for additional assistance.

You are going to want to run the fuel out of the system.
Figure 2

You are going to want to run the fuel out of the system. Begin by opening the access panel on the left side of the dash by using a trim removal tool and gently prying the panel out from the dash (red arrow).

Use the fuse removal tool on the back of the panel and remove the fuse for the fuel pump (red arrow).
Figure 3

Use the fuse removal tool on the back of the panel and remove the fuse for the fuel pump (red arrow). Make sure to check with your owners manual to locate the proper fuse. With the fuse removed try to start the engine; if it does start it will die quickly from fuel starvation. Usually a couple turns of the key will do it.

There is a Schrader valve located on the pump housing (red arrow).
Figure 4

There is a Schrader valve located on the pump housing (red arrow). You can unscrew the cap and use the valve to relieve any residual pressure. Have a rag or cloth handy to catch whatever remaining fuel that will come out.

There is going to be all kinds of dirt and debris down in by the injectors and where the intake manifold meets the head.
Figure 5

There is going to be all kinds of dirt and debris down in by the injectors and where the intake manifold meets the head. Use compressed air and blow out the area as best you can (red arrow).

Separate the low pressure sensor from the fuel pump (red arrow).
Figure 6

Separate the low pressure sensor from the fuel pump (red arrow).

Use a 13mm and 17mm wrench and separate the fuel out line fitting from the pump (red arrow).
Figure 7

Use a 13mm and 17mm wrench and separate the fuel out line fitting from the pump (red arrow).

Use a 14mm wrench and remove the input line from the pump (red arrow).
Figure 8

Use a 14mm wrench and remove the input line from the pump (red arrow). There will be a small washer that you will need to replace.

Remove the vacuum line between the manifold and head (red arrows) and separate the vacuum line from the vacuum pump to the head (yellow arrow).
Figure 9

Remove the vacuum line between the manifold and head (red arrows) and separate the vacuum line from the vacuum pump to the head (yellow arrow).

Separate the wiring connection (red arrow) from the purge valve (yellow arrow).
Figure 10

Separate the wiring connection (red arrow) from the purge valve (yellow arrow).

Disconnect the two EVAP lines from that go from the purge valve to the head (red arrows).
Figure 11

Disconnect the two EVAP lines from that go from the purge valve to the head (red arrows).

Disconnect the fuel lines (red arrows) and separate the rubber lines from the metal.
Figure 12

Disconnect the fuel lines (red arrows) and separate the rubber lines from the metal. I found the EVAP line (yellow arrow) was difficult to get at on the manifold so I disconnected it by the reservoir.

Squeeze in the clip and disconnect the EVAP line (red arrow).
Figure 13

Squeeze in the clip and disconnect the EVAP line (red arrow).

Remove the dip stick from its holder (red arrow) and then remove the two 10mm nuts (yellow arrows) holding the water line bracket in place.
Figure 14

Remove the dip stick from its holder (red arrow) and then remove the two 10mm nuts (yellow arrows) holding the water line bracket in place. Lower the water line bracket off the manifold stud.

Disconnect the wiring harness for the fuel injectors (green arrow).
Figure 15

Disconnect the wiring harness for the fuel injectors (green arrow). Now you need to remove what is referred to as the Satan bolt (red arrow). There is a bracket that supports the manifold. Remove the 13mm nut from the top of the bracket (yellow arrow). At the bottom of the bracket is a 5mm triple square bolt securing the bracket to the engine. There is very, very little room to work. Take your time and make sure you get the bit well seated in the socket and remove the bolt. I was able to get my bit through the lines on the end of a 1/4 inch extension and remove the bolt.

Remove the six T30 Torx bolts holding the manifold and fuel rail on (red arrows).
Figure 16

Remove the six T30 Torx bolts holding the manifold and fuel rail on (red arrows). There are four on the top of the manifold and two underneath in the center. Next remove the two 10mm nuts securing the manifold and fuel rail to the engine (yellow arrows). With this done everything should be free that connects the manifold to the vehicle; take a minute and double check. The only thing that is holding everything in place now is the seals in the injectors. There are seals that hold the injectors in the head and seals that hold the injectors in the fuel rail. Wiggle and pull straight back until the injectors give up their hold at either the head or fuel rail. With everything free double check that you have not missed a line or electrical connection.

Our manifold came off with all of the injectors (red arrows) still attached to the fuel rails, yours may leave all of them in the engine or any combination there of.
Figure 17

Our manifold came off with all of the injectors (red arrows) still attached to the fuel rails, yours may leave all of them in the engine or any combination there of. The green arrow shows the intake gasket which needs to be replaced every time the manifold is removed.

This photo illustrates the head with the manifold and injector off.
Figure 18

This photo illustrates the head with the manifold and injector off. You can see the openings for the T30 Torx bolts (red arrows) as well as the two studs where the 10m nuts go (yellow arrows). Even with blowing out the engine before working you can still see all of the dirt that ended up in the injector ports; use caution cleaning this out so it does NOT get into the engine. Installation is the reverse of removal. Make sure you clean everything really well. Use a new gasket on the manifold, seals on the injectors and washers (where applicable) on the fuel fittings

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Comments and Suggestions:
2006VWGTISWAG Comments: Never mind on the tools needed I missed that part some how.
March 26, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the follow up. We appreciate it.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
2006VWGTISWAG Comments: I'm looking to soda blast my valves and obviously need to remove the intake manifold. So I have to relearn the throttle body adaptation? Can this be done with VAGCOM? Can you provide a link? Also tools needed would be helpful to prepare for this job. Thanks for the write up though.
March 26, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: VAg-COm can perform the adaptation. Tools are listed in the article.- Nick at Pelican Parts  
Arnet1990 Comments: To remove the manifold is it necessary to remove the throttle body? It looks like the throttle body can remain intact during removal, either way will I need to recode the ECM as mentioned in the throttle body removal/cleaning DIY?

Thanks
January 14, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Yes, it has to come off.

Yes, you will have to relearn the throttle body adaptation. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 

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Page last updated: Mon 12/5/2016 02:35:54 AM