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Pelican Technical Article:

Radiator Hose Replacement

Steve Vernon

Time:

2 hours2 hrs

Tab:

$100

Talent:

**

Tools:

Flat head screw driver, pliers,

Applicable Models:

VW Golf GTI (2000)
VW Golf GTI 1.8T (2002-05)
VW Golf GTI 20th Anniversary (2003)
VW Golf GTI 337 (2002)
VW Golf GTI GLS (2001)

Parts Required:

New hoses

Hot Tip:

Work on a cool car

Performance Gain:

Proper operating temperature

Complementary Modification:

Flush the radiator

The cooling system on your vehicle is one of the most important and yet neglected parts of the car. Nothing can leave you stranded faster than not replacing a rubber hose before it goes bad. I recommend inspecting your hoses and couplings every two years or so. As they age, they have a tendency to get hard and brittle. When you gently squeeze a hose, it should be relatively soft and easy to indent with your hand. It should not feel like it is brittle or crunching when you squeeze it. It should spring back to its original shape pretty quickly after being compressed. If it feels very hard, then it might be time to replace it. If there is a bulge in the hose, or any type of crack in the surface of the hose, then you should replace it as well. Also check for leaks around where the hoses create their connections--that is a sign that the hose should be replaced.

With the front of the vehicle removed you can see the major hoses you will want to check or replace.
Figure 1

With the front of the vehicle removed you can see the major hoses you will want to check or replace. Note; you do NOT need to remove the front of the car to perform this work this is strictly for demonstration purposes. Coolant hose to radiator and thermostat/ pump (red arrow), hose to radiator and flange to engine (green arrow) hoses to oil cooler adaptor piece (yellow arrow).

The hoses are connected to the radiator by both a quick coupling piece as well as a traditional hose clamp.
Figure 2

The hoses are connected to the radiator by both a quick coupling piece as well as a traditional hose clamp. If you are changing the radiator hoses please see our article on coolant flush to drain the coolant before performing this work. To release the hose from the quick coupler pull up on the release spring (yellow arrow) and wiggle/pull it from the coupler (red arrow).

The lower hose is also attached to the radiator by a plastic clip (yellow arrow) that just unclips.
Figure 3

The lower hose is also attached to the radiator by a plastic clip (yellow arrow) that just unclips.

The lower radiator hose attaches to the thermostat housing.
Figure 4

The lower radiator hose attaches to the thermostat housing. There is a fair amount of work you need to do to get access to it. Please see our article on replacing your thermostat for instructions on what to remove to get access to the hose and clamp. With everything removed squeeze the hose clamp (red arrow) and remove it from the thermostat housing making sure that if you have remove the dipstick tube to give you better access that you cover the opening (yellow arrow) to prevent any coolant remaining in the hose from getting into the engine.

The upper radiator hose is easier to remove by releasing the traditional hose clamp (red arrow).
Figure 5

The upper radiator hose is easier to remove by releasing the traditional hose clamp (red arrow).

With the radiator out of the car you can better a better view of the quick disconnect coupler.
Figure 6

With the radiator out of the car you can better a better view of the quick disconnect coupler. If you are replacing the hose and coupler you do not need to remove the radiator just release the retaining spring (red arrow) and pull/wiggle the coupler from the radiator. Use caution as these parts are plastic and have seen a lot of heat cycles which can make them brittle.

This photo illustrates the flange where the upper radiator hose (green arrow) oil cooler hose (yellow arrow) and the hose to the heater core (red arrow) meet at the flange that joins them to the engine.
Figure 7

This photo illustrates the flange where the upper radiator hose (green arrow) oil cooler hose (yellow arrow) and the hose to the heater core (red arrow) meet at the flange that joins them to the engine. You can see the corrosion on the heater core line; this should be cleaned up before installing a new hose. If you need to replace any of these hoses please see our article on coolant temperature sensor replacement for the work you need to perform to access this area. All of these hoses are held in place by traditional clamps but have markings on the hoses to assist in placement.

The hoses on the oil cooler are held in place by traditional hose clamps (red arrows).
Figure 8

The hoses on the oil cooler are held in place by traditional hose clamps (red arrows). This is a very tight area to work in and is best approached from below.

The overflow hose to the coolant reservoir is located on the top of the reservoir and is attached by a tradition hose clamp (red arrow).
Figure 9

The overflow hose to the coolant reservoir is located on the top of the reservoir and is attached by a tradition hose clamp (red arrow).

The supply line is located on the bottom of the reservoir (red arrow) and depending on the orientation of the clamp may be able to be removed with the reservoir in place, if not please see our article on replacing your overflow reservoir for procedures for removing it.
Figure 10

The supply line is located on the bottom of the reservoir (red arrow) and depending on the orientation of the clamp may be able to be removed with the reservoir in place, if not please see our article on replacing your overflow reservoir for procedures for removing it.

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Comments and Suggestions:
bumba007 Comments: great tutorial and excellent instructions and pictures
February 5, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the feedback. Glad we could help.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 

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