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Pelican Technical Article:

Replacing Your Water Pump

Steve Vernon

Time:

6 hours6 hrs

Tab:

$50 to $125

Talent:

*****

Tools:

8mm, 10mm wrench and socket, extensions, universal joint, flathead screwdriver, pliers

Applicable Models:

VW Golf GTI (2000)
VW Golf GTI 1.8T (2002-05)
VW Golf GTI 20th Anniversary (2003)
VW Golf GTI 337 (2002)
VW Golf GTI GLS (2001)

Parts Required:

New water pump and gasket

Hot Tip:

Patience, patience, patience

Performance Gain:

Properly cooled engine

Complementary Modification:

Replace your timing belt

Most water pump failures result in coolant pooling beneath the car, but another sign that the pump is going bad is you'll notice that the car tends to overheat at low engine speed, such as sitting at a stoplight. When you accelerate, the engine temperature will drop. Now, this is not always indicative of a water pump, but a good starting point. You may also want to try squeezing the top radiator hose with the engine warmed up and running (use a glove and watch for heat). You should feel pressure build up on the back of the hose and surge once it is released. If you feel no pressure, it's a fair bet that the water pump is failing.

Replacing the water or coolant pump on GTI Mark 4 is a doable job for a DIY'er but it is not a quick job. If you thought the thermostat was in an awkward and tight spot to work wait till you see the coolant pump. Give yourself at least 6 hours to get the job done and don't forget to refill the coolant when you are finished.

You will need to begin by draining the coolant. Please see our article on flushing your radiator.

Next you will need to remove the V-belt and tensioner. Please see our article on replacing your belt tensioner.

While it is possible to replace the coolant pump without removing all the lines on the top of the engine I did so I could get pictures. I would recommend removing the lines to give you more room to work and a chance to see what you are doing. If you decide to go this route first begin by labeling all the fuel lines, coolant lines and EVAP lines that are in your way and then remove them. They are just a series of hoses clamps and push pull connectors for the fuel lines.

Remove the upper belt cover. There are two snap clips that you pop out with finger pressure or a flat head screwdriver.

Next remove the lower belt cover. It is impossible to get a picture of it in the car so I am showing it out of the car. There are three 10mm bolts holding it in place. Remove these and remove the cover from underneath the car.

With the covers off and the hoses out of the way you can see the chain tensioner and water pump. You are going to need to remove the belt so you must set the engine at top dead center. While this is not absolutely necessary if nothing moves while working on the car, it is a very good idea to take this extra step to be safe.

Rotate the engine until the cam chain sprocket is lined up with the witness mark on the sprocket and the head.

Once this is lined up make sure the crank witness mark is lined up with the witness mark on the block. You will need to look down from above to see this.

Next is the worse part of the job because there is very little room to work and a lot of the work must be done by feel as you can not see anything once you get your hands in there. If you have not bought the tensioner removal kit you will need a 5x55mm threaded stud and a nut and small washer to fit it. Begin by screwing the threaded portion of the stud into the tensioner mount on the engine block. There is a small threaded hole in the mount that the stud will thread into. Next install the washer and nut on the stud so that they are between the cut out in the tensioner lever/bar. Use an 8mm wrench and screw the nut and washer down, compressing the tensioner piston until you compress the tensioner to the point you can slip the belt off.

Remove the belt from the water pump sprocket. Even though you have already drained the coolant there will still be a little that spills out so protect the belt or move it completely out of the way.

Remove the three 10mm bolts holding the pump in place and gently pry the pump from the block.

If you are inspecting the pump to see if it is good, you also want to check the gasket and mounting area as well for any corrosion or build up.

Clean the mounting area before install a new pump. Always use a new O-ring with a little lubricant on it even if reinstalling the old pump.

Installation is the reverse of removal and don't forget to fill up the system with coolant.

While it is possible to replace the coolant pump without removing all the lines on the top of the engine I did so I could getPictures.
Figure 1

While it is possible to replace the coolant pump without removing all the lines on the top of the engine I did so I could getPictures. I would recommend removing the lines to give you more room to work and a chance to see what you are doing. If you decide to go this route first begin by labeling all the fuel lines, coolant lines and EVAP lines (red arrows) that are in your way and remove them. They are just a series of hoses clamps and push pull connectors for the fuel lines.

Remove the upper belt cover.
Figure 2

Remove the upper belt cover. There are two snap clips (yellow arrows) that you pop out with finger pressure or a flat head screwdriver.

Next remove the lower belt cover.
Figure 3

Next remove the lower belt cover. It is impossible to get aPicture of it in the car so I am showing it out of the car. There are three 10mm bolts holding it in place (red arrows show the bolt holes). Remove these and remove the cover from underneath the car.

With the covers off and the hoses out of the way you can see the chain tensioner (red arrow) and water pump (yellow arrow).
Figure 4

With the covers off and the hoses out of the way you can see the chain tensioner (red arrow) and water pump (yellow arrow). You are going to need to remove the belt so you must set the engine at top dead center (TDC). While this is not absolutely necessary if nothing moves while working on the car, it is a very good idea to take this extra step to be safe.

Rotate the engine until the cam chain sprocket is lined up with the witness mark on the sprocket and the head (red arrows).
Figure 5

Rotate the engine until the cam chain sprocket is lined up with the witness mark on the sprocket and the head (red arrows).

Once this is lined up make sure the crank witness mark is lined up with the witness mark on the block (red arrow).
Figure 6

Once this is lined up make sure the crank witness mark is lined up with the witness mark on the block (red arrow). You will need to look down from above to see this.

Next is the worse part of the job because there is very little room to work and a lot of the work must be done by feel as you can not see anything once you get your hands in there.
Figure 7

Next is the worse part of the job because there is very little room to work and a lot of the work must be done by feel as you can not see anything once you get your hands in there. If you have not bought the tensioner removal kit you will need a 5x55mm threaded stud and a nut and small washer to fit it. Begin by screwing the threaded portion of the stud into the tensioner mount on the engine block. There is a small threaded hole in the mount that the stud will thread into. Next install the washer and nut on the stud so that they are between the cut out in the tensioner lever/bar (red arrow). Use an 8mm wrench and screw the nut and washer down, compressing the tensioner piston until you compress the tensioner to the point you can slip the belt off.

Remove the belt from the water pump sprocket (yellow arrow).
Figure 8

Remove the belt from the water pump sprocket (yellow arrow). Even though you have already drained the coolant there will still be a little that spills out so protect the belt or move it completely out of the way. Remove the three 10mm bolts (red arrows, two shown) holding the pump in place and gently pry the pump from the block.

If you are inspecting the pump to see if it is good you also want to check the gasket and mounting area (red arrow) as well for any corrosion or build up (yellow arrow).
Figure 9

If you are inspecting the pump to see if it is good you also want to check the gasket and mounting area (red arrow) as well for any corrosion or build up (yellow arrow).

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Comments and Suggestions:
scott Comments: Electronic or belt water pump for 2002 gti 1.8t???
March 1, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Belt. http://www.pelicanparts.com/cgi-bin/supertech/catalog.cgi?action=frameset&return-url=/cgi-bin/supertech/catalog.cgi%3Faction%3Dframeback%26page%3D1933&catalog-url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.pelicanparts.com%2Fcatalog%2FSuperCat%2F2006%2FVAG_2006_WATPMP_pg1.htm %3Futm_source%3DSuperTech%23item0 - Nick at Pelican Parts  

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