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Pelican Technical Article:

Dog Bone Mount Replacement

Steve Vernon

Time:

1 hour1 hr

Tab:

$30

Talent:

**

Tools:

13mm, 16mm socket, cleaner and rags

Applicable Models:

VW Golf GTI (2000)
VW Golf GTI 1.8T (2002-05)
VW Golf GTI 20th Anniversary (2003)
VW Golf GTI 337 (2002)
VW Golf GTI GLS (2001)

Parts Required:

New dog bone or bushings, new mounting bolts

Hot Tip:

Clean the bolts before you try and remove them

Performance Gain:

Eliminate wheel hop

Complementary Modification:

New engine mounts

The rear engine mount or what is usually referred to as the dog bone mount is a simple and easy repair you can perform on your own car. These mounts help absorb the torque produced from the transversely mounted engine. When the bushings in the mount start to wear out you can notice an increase in wheel hop and a harder time trying to get the power to the ground. These have a tendency to wear out more frequently especially if you have modified the car to increase horsepower. While you can swap out the old dog bone for a new mount you can also replace the standard rubber bushings in the mount with new bushings made from harder or denser materials. This article will show you how to do both.

Note: The mounting hardware or bolts are stretch bolts and single use only. Always replace them.

Begin by safely lifting and supporting the car.

With the car safely lifted locate the bog bone mount. It is bolted to the transmission and the sub frame cross member.

The mount tends to get a lot of oil and road grime on it due to its location. Make sure you clean the mounting hardware well so that you do not strip it.

Use a 13mm socket and remove the two bolts holding the mount to the cross member.

Use a 16mm socket and remove the two bolts attaching it to the transmission. The transmission may move a little when you unbolt the mount so don't get your fingers caught in there.

Pull the complete mount from the car.

You can now just install a complete new dog bone or if your original mount is not damaged you can change out the bushings with new stock or a stiffer poly stock.

If you are changing out the bushings you will need to press the old bushing from the bracket. Find a socket that fits the interior diameter of the bushing and press it out. Freeze the new bushing put a little lubricant on it and press it in place.

Next place the mount in a vice and use a 16mm socket to undo the mount.

There is a long bolt that threads through the mount along with a special nut to secure it to the dog bone. Make sure you do not lose this nut.

Disassembly the mount and change out the rubber bushings with new ones or a stiffer after market poly blend.

Installation is the reverse of removal.

With the car safely lifted locate the bog bone mount (blue arrow).
Figure 1

With the car safely lifted locate the bog bone mount (blue arrow). It is bolted to the transmission (red arrows) and the sub frame cross member (yellow arrows). The mount tends to get a lot of oil and road grime on it due to its location. Make sure you clean the mounting hardware well so that you do not strip it.

Use a 13mm socket and remove the two bolts (red arrows) holding the mount to the cross member.
Figure 2

Use a 13mm socket and remove the two bolts (red arrows) holding the mount to the cross member.

Use a 16mm socket and remove the two bolts (yellow arrows) attaching it to the transmission.
Figure 3

Use a 16mm socket and remove the two bolts (yellow arrows) attaching it to the transmission. The transmission may move a little when you unbolt the mount so don't get your fingers caught in there.

Pull the complete mount (red arrow) from the car.
Figure 4

Pull the complete mount (red arrow) from the car.

You can now just install a complete new dog bone or if your original mount is not damaged you can change out the bushings with new stock or a stiffer poly stock.
Figure 5

You can now just install a complete new dog bone or if your original mount is not damaged you can change out the bushings with new stock or a stiffer poly stock.

If you are changing out the bushings you will need to press the old bushing from the bracket.
Figure 6

If you are changing out the bushings you will need to press the old bushing from the bracket. Find a socket that fits the interior diameter of the bushing and press it out (yellow arrow). Freeze the new bushing put a little lubricant on it and press it in place.

Next place the mount in a vice and use a 16mm socket to undo the mount.
Figure 7

Next place the mount in a vice and use a 16mm socket to undo the mount.

There is a long bolt (yellow arrow) that threads through the mount along with a special nut (red arrow) to secure it to the dog bone.
Figure 8

There is a long bolt (yellow arrow) that threads through the mount along with a special nut (red arrow) to secure it to the dog bone. Make sure you do not lose this nut.

Disassembly the mount and change out the rubber bushings (red arrows) with new ones or a stiffer after market poly blend.
Figure 9

Disassembly the mount and change out the rubber bushings (red arrows) with new ones or a stiffer after market poly blend.

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Comments and Suggestions:
josh Comments: Hi, what happens if I stripped the front two dogbone bolt holes in the transmission case. Bolts go in but I can not torque them as them spin freely. I used new bolts but had some issues aligning them in.
September 9, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: You will either need to repair the holes using a TimSeert kit or replace the stripped part. - Nick at Pelican Parts  

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