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Ignition Module Replacement
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

Ignition Module Replacement

Nick Czerula

Time:

1 hour1 hr

Tab:

$150

Talent:

***

Tools:

Set of sockets, flathead screwdriver, DVOM

Applicable Models:

Saab 9-3 2.0T (2006-07)

Parts Required:

Ignition module

Hot Tip:

Work with a cool engine

Performance Gain:

Engine runs well

Complementary Modification:

Replace spark plugs

The engine management systems in Saab 2.0t 4-cylinder engines control fuel supply, fuel injection, ignition and emissions. In these systems, an electronic microprocessor, the engine control module or ECM, processes a variety of sensor inputs to monitor engine and vehicle conditions. The ECM operates the engine in accordance with driver input. It has self-diagnostic capabilities in accordance with US-mandated on-board diagnostics (OBD-II) standards and stores fault codes known as diagnostic trouble codes or DTCs, which can be accessed for troubleshooting purposes.

In the system idle speed, idle mixture and ignition timing are not adjustable. OBD-II standards requires the engine to operate within extremely tight tolerances maintained by feedback loops in the electronics. These standards as well as upgraded manufacturing materials and techniques allow many automotive components to function well past times and mileages that were considered normal in previous decades. As examples, engine oil and spark plugs are capable of extended life compared to the past.

The ignition system is used to generate the igniting spark, measure the combustion quality and knocking. It comprises four inductive ignition coils, one for each cylinder, with integrated power stage and ionization current measurement, CDM (Combustion Detection Module) that carries out initial processing of the ionization signal from the respective ignition coils. The ignition system receives four ignition trigger signals from the ECM and delivers two combustion signals plus one knock signal to the ECM. The ignition coils are screwed on above the spark plugs of the respective cylinders with an aluminum cover over them. The ignition coils are individually exchangeable. CDM is located on a bracket on the left-hand side of the cylinder head. The CDM is commonly referred to as the ignition module.

The ignition system comprises four ignition coils, one for each cylinder. The ignition coils are supplied with B+ on pin 1 from the main relay (229). Pin 2 is connected to grounding point G7.

When the main relay is activated, B+ is applied to pin 1 on the ignition coils. When pin 3 on each ignition coil is supplied with B+ by ECM, a power transistor integrated in the ignition coil will close the primary circuit where the primary winding comprises relatively few coils of copper wire. A magnetic field now gradually forms in the ignition coil and just as the spark is to ignite, ECM will stop supplying B+ to pin 3 and a high tension will be induced across the secondary winding of the ignition coil.

The ignition coils can generate voltages of up to 40 kV. This is important to know when testing for safety and max Kv output. When testing a coil for a misfire, the coil should be able to fire a 20Kv HEI spark tester.

Keep in mind that when your car was serviced before, parts may have been replaced with different size fasteners used in the replacement. The sizes of the nuts and bolts we give may be different from what you have, so be prepared with different size sockets and wrenches.

Protect your eyes, hands and body from fluids, dust and debris while working on your vehicle. If you're working with the electrical system, disconnect the battery before beginning. Always catch fluids in appropriate containers and properly dispose of any fluid waste. Recycle parts, packaging and fluids when possible. Never work on your vehicle if you feel the task is beyond your ability.

Our vehicle may vary slightly from yours as models do change and evolve, as they grow older. If something seems different, let us know and share your info to help other users. Do you have questions or want to add to the article? Leave a comment below. When leaving a comment, please leave your vehicle information.

The ignition system is used to generate the igniting spark, measure the combustion quality and knocking.
Figure 1

The ignition system is used to generate the igniting spark, measure the combustion quality and knocking. It comprises four inductive ignition coils, one for each cylinder, with integrated power stage and ionization current measurement, CDM (Combustion Detection Module) (red arrow) that carries out initial processing of the ionization signal from the respective ignition coils. The CDM is commonly referred to as the ignition module. CDM is located on a bracket on the left-hand side of the cylinder head.

Start by removing the electrical connector.
Figure 2

Start by removing the electrical connector. Unlock it by sliding the lock toward the firewall (red arrow). Then pull the connector straight up to remove it.

Working at the CDM, remove the two 10mm fasteners (red arrows).
Figure 3

Working at the CDM, remove the two 10mm fasteners (red arrows).

Remove the CDM (red arrow) from the mounting bracket.
Figure 4

Remove the CDM (red arrow) from the mounting bracket. Reverse the steps to install the new CDM.

For testing, use a wiring diagram for your vehicle and test the power and ground supply to the CDM.
Figure 5

For testing, use a wiring diagram for your vehicle and test the power and ground supply to the CDM. Match the circuit identifiers on the module (blue arrow) with the terminals on the connector (red arrow). The ignition system comprises four ignition coils, one for each cylinder. The ignition coils are supplied with B+ on pin 1 from the main relay (229). Pin 2 is connected to grounding point G7. When the main relay is activated, B+ is applied to pin 1 on the ignition coils. When pin 3 on each ignition coil is supplied with B+ by ECM, a power transistor integrated in the ignition coil will close the primary circuit where the primary winding comprises relatively few coils of copper wire. A magnetic field now gradually forms in the ignition coil. Just as the spark is to ignite, ECM will stop supplying B+ to pin 3, and a high tension will be induced across the secondary winding of the ignition coil.


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Comments and Suggestions:
Jerry Comments: do nit need to be programmed by a saab dealer after replacement thanks
November 6, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Ignition module, no. - Nick at Pelican Parts  

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