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Exhaust Manifold Removal
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

Exhaust Manifold Removal

Steve Vernon

Time:

3-6 hours

Tab:

$40 to $110

Talent:

***

Tools:

13mm, 12mm sockets and wrenches, 6mm Allen, floor jack, jack stands, wheel chocks, safety glasses, torque wrench

Applicable Models:

Porsche 944 Turbo (1986-89)

Parts Required:

Gaskets and hardware

Hot Tip:

Spray all the hardware with penetrating oil

Performance Gain:

Proper power

Complementary Modification:

Check spark plugs

The exhaust manifold on the Porsche 951 is actually two manifolds that run off the right side of the head down to a cross over pipe that feeds the turbo. There is not a lot of room to work between the head and the fender but if you move a couple of components you can remove the manifolds. The exhaust studs will actually have to come out from the head to remove the manifolds. If you break a stud off there is a very good chance that you are going to have to pull the head to remove the broken stud.

Begin by soaking everything in penetrating oil. It is best if you can do this over a few days and heat cycles before you attempt to remove everything. Next, safely raise and support the vehicle. Please see our article on safely raising and supporting your vehicle. There is a coolant line that runs above the manifolds that you will need to remove so you will need to drain the coolant to below this level. Please see our article on coolant draining and refilling.

This photo illustrates the tight fit you have to deal with when removing the exhaust manifolds (red arrows).
Figure 1

This photo illustrates the tight fit you have to deal with when removing the exhaust manifolds (red arrows).

At a minimum you will need to remove the fuel supply and return lines (red arrow).
Figure 2

At a minimum you will need to remove the fuel supply and return lines (red arrow). Please see our article on fuel injector and rail removal for additional information. Release the clamp on the power steering fluid reservoir and move it out of the way (yellow arrow). You can see in the photo that I have removed several other components for photographic purposes; you do not need to do this but removing the camshaft cover will give you a lot more room to work.

There is a coolant line that runs along the top of the exhaust manifolds that you will need to remove.
Figure 3

There is a coolant line that runs along the top of the exhaust manifolds that you will need to remove. If you are leaving the camshaft cover in place use a 6mm Allen and remove the two bolts holding the line in place (red arrows).

Drain the coolant to below this line's level and remove the two hose connections (red arrow, one shown), and remove the hard line.
Figure 4

Drain the coolant to below this line's level and remove the two hose connections (red arrow, one shown), and remove the hard line.

Working from below the vehicle you can see where the flange from the number 2 and 3 cylinders (yellow arrow) and the number 1 and 4 cylinders meet the crossover pipe that goes to the turbo (green arrow).
Figure 5

Working from below the vehicle you can see where the flange from the number 2 and 3 cylinders (yellow arrow) and the number 1 and 4 cylinders meet the crossover pipe that goes to the turbo (green arrow).

It is easier to remove the lower connections first, as this will give you some wiggle room when removing the exhaust manifolds from the head.
Figure 6

It is easier to remove the lower connections first, as this will give you some wiggle room when removing the exhaust manifolds from the head. Use a 12mm socket from below (red arrows) and a 13mm wrench from above (yellow arrows) and remove the nuts and bolts. These bolts can be a pain to remove. You should be prepared to have a few break.

The exhaust is actually two manifolds, one for the number two and three cylinders (red arrows) and one for the number one and four (yellow arrows).
Figure 7

The exhaust is actually two manifolds, one for the number two and three cylinders (red arrows) and one for the number one and four (yellow arrows). It is easier to remove the number two and three manifold first.

You cannot remove the manifolds without removing the studs from the head.
Figure 8

You cannot remove the manifolds without removing the studs from the head. There is not much room to double nut the studs with the washers on (red arrows).

Remove both nuts and washers from the flange and then double nut (red arrows) one stud at a time.
Figure 9

Remove both nuts and washers from the flange and then double nut (red arrows) one stud at a time. With the stud double nutted, the stud will walk right out from the head (yellow arrow). By removing the washer you can see how much more stud you have to work with when double nutting (green arrow).

The studs are long (red arrow) and will be a close fit to the heat shield on the manifold.
Figure 10

The studs are long (red arrow) and will be a close fit to the heat shield on the manifold. Take your time and they will come out.

Remove the number two and three manifold first and then the number one and four.
Figure 11

Remove the number two and three manifold first and then the number one and four. If you break off a stud there is a good chance you are going to have to pull the head to remove the broken stud. Please see our article on cylinder head removal for additional assistance. Installation is the reverse of removal.


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