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Pelican Technical Article:

Camshaft Removal

Steve Vernon

Time:

2 hours2 hrs

Tab:

$20 to $50

Talent:

***

Tools:

8mm, 6mm short and long Allen, 10mm wrench

Applicable Models:

Porsche 944 Turbo (1986-89)

Parts Required:

New seals

Hot Tip:

Make sure engine is at Top Dead Center

Performance Gain:

Proper engine operation

Complementary Modification:

New belts

The design of the 8 valve Porsche 944 engine differs from most engines when it comes to the camshaft and valve cover. Unlike traditional designs where there is a separate valve cover that just covers the valve train and can be removed to service the valve train and camshaft(s) the "valve cover" on the 8 valve 944 motors actually houses the camshaft and lifters. This camshaft housing also is responsible for bolting the camshaft and lifter to the valve train in the head. Removal is not difficult but does involve more work than that of a traditional motor. You will need to remove the camshaft housing from the engine to remove the camshaft.

To remove the camshaft housing and camshaft you will first need to remove the fuel rail (red arrow).
Figure 1

To remove the camshaft housing and camshaft you will first need to remove the fuel rail (red arrow). Please see our article on fuel rail removal for additional information.

You will also need to remove the distributor cap (red arrow) and the timing and balance shaft belts behind the front cover (red arrow).
Figure 2

You will also need to remove the distributor cap (red arrow) and the timing and balance shaft belts behind the front cover (red arrow). Please see our article on these procedures for further assistance.

To remove the camshaft from the housing you will need to remove the cam-timing sprocket on the front (red arrow).
Figure 3

To remove the camshaft from the housing you will need to remove the cam-timing sprocket on the front (red arrow). Please see our article on cam oil seal replacement for additional assistance.

Next, you will need to remove the camshaft housing (red arrow), so please see our article on camshaft housing removal for further assistance.
Figure 4

Next, you will need to remove the camshaft housing (red arrow), so please see our article on camshaft housing removal for further assistance.

With the front sprocket and distributor housing removed you will remove the rear cover.
Figure 5

With the front sprocket and distributor housing removed you will remove the rear cover. The rear cover is held in place by three 10mm bolts. Note the positon of the two support brackets and remove the bolts (red arrows).

Remove the cover (yellow arrow) and the old gasket (red arrow).
Figure 6

Remove the cover (yellow arrow) and the old gasket (red arrow). You will be able to see the end of the camshaft where the journal sits in the housing (green arrow).

Supporting the camshaft from the front end, start feeding the cam out the rear of the housing (red arrow).
Figure 7

Supporting the camshaft from the front end, start feeding the cam out the rear of the housing (red arrow). You will need to use care when passing the journals through the journal bearing housings inside the housing, but the shaft will slip all the way out.

With the camshaft out you can see the four journals that sit in bearing supports inside of the housing (red arrows).
Figure 8

With the camshaft out you can see the four journals that sit in bearing supports inside of the housing (red arrows). You will need to clean and inspect the cam, lobes and journals for wear, cracks, pits, and heat damage.

This cam is showing signs of degradation on the lobes due to lobe taper but this is not surprising for an engine with over 177,000 miles on it.
Figure 9

This cam is showing signs of degradation on the lobes due to lobe taper but this is not surprising for an engine with over 177,000 miles on it. If your cam or lifters are showing signs of excessive wear or any damage you should replace them. It is possible to have your cams repaired and reground so check around for prices before just buying a new cam. Always use assembly grease when installing the cam back into the housing.

With the cam back in the housing reinstall the lifters into the correct openings (red arrow).
Figure 10

With the cam back in the housing reinstall the lifters into the correct openings (red arrow). If you are installing new lifters make sure to immerse them in oil for several hours and then compress them between your fingers a few times to help with the hydraulic operation on start up. Putting a little assembly lube on the outside will help hold the lifters in place when you go to install the housing.

Remember before installing the head you must install the timing sprocket and distributor housing so you can determine that the cam is at the TDC position (red and yellow arrows).
Figure 11

Remember before installing the head you must install the timing sprocket and distributor housing so you can determine that the cam is at the TDC position (red and yellow arrows). Installation is the reverse of removal. Please see our camshaft housing removal article for additional information.

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