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Flywheel Lock Installation
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

Flywheel Lock Installation

Steve Vernon

Time:

1 hour1 hr

Tab:

$50

Talent:

**

Tools:

19mm, 13mm, 8mm wrench or sockets, floor jack, jack stands, wheel chocks, safety glasses

Applicable Models:

Porsche 944 Turbo (1986-89)

Parts Required:

Flywheel lock

Hot Tip:

Make sure you have disconnected the battery

Performance Gain:

Holds the crank in position while working

Complementary Modification:

New starter

There are a host of jobs that you will need to lock the flywheel in position on your Porsche 944. Most of these jobs also include setting the motor at TDC or Top Dead Center first, so please see our article on setting the engine at TDC if you need to do that. Replacing belts or the water pump also requires you to lock the motor and prevent it from turning while having the belts off. It will also come in handy for removing the crank pulley with the vehicle up in the air.

You are going to have to remove the starter to use the flywheel lock so you will have to jack up and safely support the vehicle. Please see our article on jacking up and supporting your car.

Before removing the starter it is a really good idea to disconnect both the ground or negative (red arrow) and the positive strap as well (yellow arrow).
Figure 1

Before removing the starter it is a really good idea to disconnect both the ground or negative (red arrow) and the positive strap as well (yellow arrow). There is a direct strap from the positive side of the battery to the starter. If you accidentally ground the starter with a tool while working on it you can cause serious damage to yourself and the car.

The starter (red arrow) is located on the rear of the motor facing the back of the car.
Figure 2

The starter (red arrow) is located on the rear of the motor facing the back of the car. The Turbo cars have a heat shield on them to protect them from the turbo plumbing (yellow arrow).

Begin by removing the 8mm nut on the starter solenoid (red arrow).
Figure 3

Begin by removing the 8mm nut on the starter solenoid (red arrow).

Next, remove the 13mm nut securing the two positive cables (red arrow).
Figure 4

Next, remove the 13mm nut securing the two positive cables (red arrow). If you have not disconnected the positive cable from the battery this is where you want to be extra careful because accidentally causing a ground between these cables can result in injury to yourself and damage to the car.

Make sure to clean the cables so they can make good contact (red arrow) when reinstalling.
Figure 5

Make sure to clean the cables so they can make good contact (red arrow) when reinstalling.

There are two 19mm bolts holding the starter in place (red arrows, one shown).
Figure 6

There are two 19mm bolts holding the starter in place (red arrows, one shown). One bolt is on the rear of the starter and faces the front of the motor. The other one is on the bell housing and faces the rear. Remove both bolts, using care on the last one, as once they are removed the starter will be free and can fall if you do not have a hand on it.

Remove the starter by moving it down and out from the mount (red arrow).
Figure 7

Remove the starter by moving it down and out from the mount (red arrow).

With the starter motor removed you can see the flywheel and the ring gear (red arrow).
Figure 8

With the starter motor removed you can see the flywheel and the ring gear (red arrow). The lock will mount using the two holes (yellow arrows) and bolts that the starter uses.

The flywheel lock has a set of metal teeth (red arrow) that will mesh with the starter ring gear on the flywheel.
Figure 9

The flywheel lock has a set of metal teeth (red arrow) that will mesh with the starter ring gear on the flywheel. You will use the same mounting holes that the starter uses (yellow arrow).

Insert the lock so that it meshes up with the ring gear (red arrow).
Figure 10

Insert the lock so that it meshes up with the ring gear (red arrow). You may have to put one bolt in first and then swing the teeth on the lock into position. Once you have it in place tighten down the bolt with the threaded hole with the other bolt installed into the blank hole. This should be plenty of force to hold it in place. If you are nervous you can put a 19mm nut on the end of the bolt sticking out of the blank hole. Removal is the reverse of installation.

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