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Coolant and Radiator Hose Replacement
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

Coolant and Radiator Hose Replacement

Steve Vernon

Time:

2 hours2 hrs

Tab:

$2 to $150

Talent:

**

Tools:

Pliers, flathead screwdriver, large bucket

Applicable Models:

Porsche 944 Turbo (1986-89)

Parts Required:

New hoses

Hot Tip:

Get a really big bucket

Performance Gain:

Proper cooling

Complementary Modification:

Radiator flush

The cooling system on your vehicle is one of the most important and yet neglected parts of the car. Nothing can leave you stranded faster than not replacing a rubber hose before it goes bad. I recommend inspecting your hoses and couplings every two years or so. As they age, they have a tendency to get hard and brittle. When you gently squeeze a hose, it should be relatively soft and easy to indent with your hand. It shouldn't feel like it is brittle or crunching when you squeeze it. It should spring back to its original shape pretty quickly after being compressed. If it feels very hard, then it might be time to replace it. If there is a bulge in the hose, or any type of crack in the surface of the hose, then you should replace it as well. Also check for leaks around where the hoses create their connections--that is a sign that the hose should be replaced.

A couple of safety precautions/instructions you may want to observe before beginning:

Allow the cooling system to cool down to a coolant temperature of less than 90 degrees C. Open the cap of the cooling system slowly; turn a conventional coolant cap as far as the first detent and turn a screwed coolant cap approx. 1/2 turn and release the pressure. Wear protective gloves, protective clothing and eye protection. NEVER pour coolant into beverage bottles, cups, etc... Someone might accidentally pick that cup up and start to drink.

If the coolant in the car is new there is no reason to replace it as long as you drain it into a clean container. Coolant is expensive and not too great for the environment, so if the coolant in your car is good, try and save it to reuse.

You will need to drain the system to below the hoses you are replacing and then refill and bleed the cooling system. Please see our articles on these procedures for additional assistance.

There is a metal cross over pipe that distributes the coolant to the various lines and hoses in the vehicle.
Figure 1

There is a metal cross over pipe that distributes the coolant to the various lines and hoses in the vehicle. The pipe runs across the front of the engine compartment between the radiator and the engine. To access it and many of the coolant hoses you will need to remove the air filter, air box, air flow meter (red arrow)and the turbo pipe (yellow arrow). Please see our articles on these procedures for additional assistance.

You will need to remove the manifold air intake tube to get access to the coolant hoses and cross over pipe on the left side of the motor.
Figure 2

You will need to remove the manifold air intake tube to get access to the coolant hoses and cross over pipe on the left side of the motor. Use a flathead screwdriver and remove the four hose clamps and the hoses attached to the tube and remove the tube from the vehicle.

There are three lines that attach to the fluid expansion tank (red arrows) plus the overflow line by the cap.
Figure 3

There are three lines that attach to the fluid expansion tank (red arrows) plus the overflow line by the cap. If you are replacing these lines, you must drain the expansion tank first.

With the air box and intake tubes removed, you can see the metal [pipe that the coolant lines attach too (red arrows).
Figure 4

With the air box and intake tubes removed, you can see the metal [pipe that the coolant lines attach too (red arrows). It is possible to remove and replace this tube but it very rarely gets damaged except as a result of an accident.

All the hoses on the 951 are held in place by traditional hose clamps.
Figure 5

All the hoses on the 951 are held in place by traditional hose clamps. All you will need to remove and replace the hoses is a flathead screwdriver. If you know that you are replacing the hose and it has corroded onto the pipe of fitting, you can cut the old hose with a razor blade, clean the fitting and then install a new hose. Here is a list of the hoses on the 951 along with the part numbers. 1- 944-106-241-03, 2- 951-106-237-02, 3- 951-106-245-03, 4- 951-106-321-02, 5- 951-106-241-01, 6- 951-106-239-01, 7- 951-106-322-02, 8- 951-106-251-02, 9- 951-106-248-00, 10- 951-106-247-02, 11-951-106-247-04, 12- 944-106-251-00, 13- 951-106-249-01.


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Comments and Suggestions:
chazzman Comments: excellent article
November 21, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the feedback. Glad we could help.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 

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