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Blower Motor and Fan Replacement
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

Blower Motor and Fan Replacement

Steve Vernon

Time:

1 hour1 hr

Tab:

$25 to $600

Talent:

**

Tools:

Philips head screwdriver, 8mm socket

Applicable Models:

Porsche 944 Turbo (1986-89)

Parts Required:

Blower motor or fans

Hot Tip:

Use care removing the blower cover

Performance Gain:

Working heat and A/C

Complementary Modification:

Make cabin air filter

While a true sports car, unlike the older vehicles from Porsche, the 944 is fully capable of keeping you warm in the winter and cool in the summer. Over time some of the components in the HVAC system will start to wear out and require repair or replacement. This is especially true if you live in a harsh four-season environment and run the system more than a vehicle that lives in a more temperate location.

One of the more common components that wear out is the blower motor. If your blower fan is not operating properly and you have checked the resistor, or it is starting to make sounds and is beginning to fail, this article will show you how to change the blower motor and the fans.

The blower motor and fans are in the blower housing located under the cowl cover piece at the base of the windshield (red arrow).
Figure 1

The blower motor and fans are in the blower housing located under the cowl cover piece at the base of the windshield (red arrow).

Begin by pulling up and removing the rubber seal that runs along the divider between the engine bay and HVAC system (red arrow).
Figure 2

Begin by pulling up and removing the rubber seal that runs along the divider between the engine bay and HVAC system (red arrow).

You will need to remove the plastic cover (red arrow).
Figure 3

You will need to remove the plastic cover (red arrow). There is a very good chance this will not come off in one piece. These covers get very old and brittle over the years. If you have not removed it lately there is a good chance you will damage it and need to replace it when removing.

With the cover off you can see the blower housing (red arrow) that the blower and fan sits inside of.
Figure 4

With the cover off you can see the blower housing (red arrow) that the blower and fan sits inside of. You will need to work with the resistor connection (yellow arrow) as well as the vacuum actuators on both sides of the housing (green arrows).

Remove the connection for the blower motor resistor by wiggling and pulling it out from the connection (red arrow).
Figure 5

Remove the connection for the blower motor resistor by wiggling and pulling it out from the connection (red arrow).

On the left side vacuum actuator, you will need to disconnect the wiring connection (red arrow) for the blower motor and pull the vacuum line off the end (yellow arrow).
Figure 6

On the left side vacuum actuator, you will need to disconnect the wiring connection (red arrow) for the blower motor and pull the vacuum line off the end (yellow arrow).

Remove the electrical connection from the actuator mount (red arrow), as this is the wiring for the blower motor and will be removed from the compartment with the motor.
Figure 7

Remove the electrical connection from the actuator mount (red arrow), as this is the wiring for the blower motor and will be removed from the compartment with the motor. Make sure to clip any zip ties holding the wiring in place.

On the right side actuator, disconnect the vacuum line (yellow arrow) and slip the air temperature sensor out from its mount (red arrow).
Figure 8

On the right side actuator, disconnect the vacuum line (yellow arrow) and slip the air temperature sensor out from its mount (red arrow).

Use a Philips head screwdriver and remove the 12 screws holding the lid in place (red arrows).
Figure 9

Use a Philips head screwdriver and remove the 12 screws holding the lid in place (red arrows). It is a good idea to have a small telescoping magnet to retrieve any dropped screws.

You can now lift the lid of the housing (red arrow).
Figure 10

You can now lift the lid of the housing (red arrow). In some cases you may need to use a gently prying force to separate the lid from the housing. The two flaps will travel with the lid (yellow arrows). You can now see the blower motor and fans (green arrow).

With the lid out of the engine compartment you can see where all the screws are mounted (red arrows).
Figure 11

With the lid out of the engine compartment you can see where all the screws are mounted (red arrows).

Lift the blower motor and fans out of the assembly as one piece, making sure to free up the vent tube (red arrow) and the wiring cable (yellow arrow).
Figure 12

Lift the blower motor and fans out of the assembly as one piece, making sure to free up the vent tube (red arrow) and the wiring cable (yellow arrow).

If you are transferring the old fans to the new motor or you just want to remove the fans to clean them, use an 8mm socket and remove the single nut from each fan (red arrow) and pull the fan off of the motor shaft (yellow arrow).
Figure 13

If you are transferring the old fans to the new motor or you just want to remove the fans to clean them, use an 8mm socket and remove the single nut from each fan (red arrow) and pull the fan off of the motor shaft (yellow arrow). In some cases you may need to use a puller to separate the fan from the shaft. Always pull in a straight line. You do not want to bend the shaft or have any wobble in the fan, as it will make a racket and cause trouble. Installation is the reverse of removal.


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