Porsche Parts Catalog Porsche Accessories Catalog Porsche Technical Articles Porsche Tech Forums
 
  Search our site:    
View Recent Cars  |   Cart  | Project List | Order Status | Help    
 >  >
Clutch Slave Cylinder Replacement
 
Bookmark and Share

Pelican Technical Article:

Clutch Slave Cylinder Replacement

Steve Vernon

Time:

2 hours2 hrs

Tab:

$30 to $200

Talent:

**

Tools:

13mm, 8mm wrench or sockets, flared nut wrenches

Applicable Models:

Porsche 944 Turbo (1986-89)

Parts Required:

Clutch slave cylinder, brake fluid

Hot Tip:

Make sure you have disconnected the battery

Performance Gain:

Working clutch

Complementary Modification:

Bleed the brake system

If you're having issues with your clutch not completely engaging or disengaging, one of the first things you should do is check for any leaks in the system. You can do this by parking on a clean spot and then working the clutch several times and leaving the car overnight. If you see hydraulic spots on the ground when you move the car in the morning, there is a good chance you have a leak somewhere. If you do not have any leaks, you will want to bleed the clutch slave cylinder. The clutch pulls its fluid from a line attached to the brake reservoir. The clutch hydraulic system uses the same fluid as the brake system and it is hydroscopic. This means that the fluid will naturally absorb water over time and this can greatly affect the hydraulic system. The fluid can also cause corrosion and damage the seals, so it is a good idea to flush and bleed both the brake and clutch system every two years.

You will need to remove the starter to bleed and replace the slave cylinder.

Please see our article on jacking up and supporting your car.

Before replacing the starter make sure to check your battery and ground strap.
Figure 1

Before replacing the starter make sure to check your battery and ground strap. A weak battery and/or faulty ground strap can easily be the cause of a non or hard starting car. Once these are checked and you are sure it is the starter at fault, begin by replacing it by disconnecting the battery. It is a really good idea to disconnect both the ground or negative (red arrow) and the positive strap as well (yellow arrow). There is a direct strap from the positive side of the battery to the starter. If you accidentally ground the starter with a tool while working on it, you can cause serious damage to yourself and the car.

The starter (red arrow) is located on the rear of the motor facing the back of the car.
Figure 2

The starter (red arrow) is located on the rear of the motor facing the back of the car. The Turbo cars have a heat shield on them to protect them from the turbo plumbing (yellow arrow).

Begin by removing the 8mm nut on the starter solenoid (red arrow).
Figure 3

Begin by removing the 8mm nut on the starter solenoid (red arrow).

Next, remove the 13mm nut securing the two positive cables (red arrow).
Figure 4

Next, remove the 13mm nut securing the two positive cables (red arrow). If you have not disconnected the positive cable from the battery, this is where you want to be extra careful because accidentally causing a ground between these cables can result in injury to yourself and damage to the car.

Make sure to clean the cables so they can make good contact (red arrow).
Figure 5

Make sure to clean the cables so they can make good contact (red arrow).

There are two 19mm bolts holding the starter in place (red arrows, one shown).
Figure 6

There are two 19mm bolts holding the starter in place (red arrows, one shown). One bolt on the rear of the starter faces the front of the motor. The other is on the bell housing and faces the rear. Remove both bolts using care on the last one. Once the bolts are removed the starter will be free and can fall if you do not have a hand on it.

Remove the starter by moving it down and out from the mount (red arrow).
Figure 7

Remove the starter by moving it down and out from the mount (red arrow).

Before you begin bleeding the slave cylinder you will want to clean around the top of the reservoir (red arrow).
Figure 8

Before you begin bleeding the slave cylinder you will want to clean around the top of the reservoir (red arrow). You do not want any dirt or debris getting into the brake fluid system.

Remove the cap with the level sensor and gasket (red arrow).
Figure 9

Remove the cap with the level sensor and gasket (red arrow). Inspect the gasket for wear, as it helps seal the system and replace as needed. Set the cap off to the side where it cannot get dirty.

Next, fill the Motive Power Bleeder with one quart of brake fluid if you are flushing the system.
Figure 10

Next, fill the Motive Power Bleeder with one quart of brake fluid if you are flushing the system. Make sure that you check with your owner's manual and use the correct brake fluid. It is wise to start out with one quart of brake fluid in the pressure bleeder and another quart on the shelf in reserve. Attach the bleeder to the top of the reservoir making sure it is tight. You do not want to have leaks when you are pressurizing the system (red arrow). Place the lid on the bleeder and use the hand pump on top to pressure the system to around 15 pounds. There is a scale on the front of the bleeder that shows the pressure (yellow arrow). You can bleed the system by just using gravity, if you do not have a pressure bleeder.

Attach a clear plastic hose to the nipple and have a catch bottle handy.
Figure 11

Attach a clear plastic hose to the nipple and have a catch bottle handy. You want to use a clear hose so that you can see bubbles in the fluid. The nipples see a lot of weather and road grime over the years, so you always want to use a flared nut wrench when working with them (red arrow). The flared nut wrench will grasp four sides of the nipple and help prevent stripping. With the system pressurized, open the bleed screw or nipple and watch the fluid flow into the catch bottle. When there is no longer air bubbles in the fluid, close off the nipple.

If you are going to replace the slave cylinder, you should move the electrical lines (red arrow) for the starter out of the way.
Figure 12

If you are going to replace the slave cylinder, you should move the electrical lines (red arrow) for the starter out of the way. They are held in place by a 10mm nut and bracket (yellow arrow). Use a 10mm wrench and remove the nut and slide everything out of your way.

You are going to remove the hydraulic line from the slave cylinder.
Figure 13

You are going to remove the hydraulic line from the slave cylinder. The lines see a lot of weather and road grime over the years, so you always want to use a flared nut wrench when working with them. The flared nut wrench will grasp four sides of the nipple and help prevent stripping. Ours was a 12mm.

Get as much fluid out of the system as possible before breaking the line.
Figure 14

Get as much fluid out of the system as possible before breaking the line. It is a good idea to use a turkey baster and remove fluid from the brake reservoir until it is below the supply line for the clutch. No matter how much fluid you drain, the slave cylinder is the lowest point in the system so some fluid will come out. Be prepared to catch and dispose of it safely. Use a 12mm flared nut wrench and remove the line from the cylinder (red arrow).

Next, use a 13mm socket or wrench and remove the two retaining bolts (red arrows).
Figure 15

Next, use a 13mm socket or wrench and remove the two retaining bolts (red arrows).

With everything disconnected, you can remove the slave cylinder from the bell housing.
Figure 16

With everything disconnected, you can remove the slave cylinder from the bell housing. Installation is the reverse of removal. You MUST bleed the clutch hydraulics before using.

Bookmark and Share

  Search our site:    

View Cart & CheckOut | Project List | Order Status |  Help    

 

[Home] [Customer Service] [Shopping Cart] [Project/Wish List]
  [Privacy Statement]  [Contact Us] [About Us] [Shipping] [Careers]

Copyright © Pelican Parts Inc. -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page

Page last updated: Wed 12/7/2016 02:52:31 AM