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Pelican Technical Article:

Seats Removal

Steve Vernon

Time:

2 hours2 hrs

Tab:

$0

Talent:

**

Tools:

6mm Allen, 10mm wrench, 17mm socket, flathead screwdriver

Applicable Models:

Porsche 944 Turbo (1986-89)

Hot Tip:

Have a vacuum ready for the carpet under the seats

Performance Gain:

Better support from installing sports seats

Complementary Modification:

Clean carpet and interior beneath seats

If you have to remove the seats from your Porsche 944 or 951 this tech article will show you how. A lot of people remove the rear seat on the 944 for weight savings. Though it may look like a daunting job it is actually quite easy. Though there are a few options for different seats in the 944 and 951, the procedures are basically the same.

Front Seats: The front seats are installed in the vehicle by two seat rails, one on each side of the front seats (red arrows).
Figure 1

Front Seats: The front seats are installed in the vehicle by two seat rails, one on each side of the front seats (red arrows).

Front Seats: Begin by tilting and sliding the seat all the way forward.
Figure 2

Front Seats: Begin by tilting and sliding the seat all the way forward. This will give you the most room to remove the rear rail bolts (red arrows).

Front Seats: It is a tight fit between the seat and the two bolts on each rail (red arrows).
Figure 3

Front Seats: It is a tight fit between the seat and the two bolts on each rail (red arrows). Make sure that the 6mm Allen is completely seated in the bolt head before removing, as you do NOT want to strip these bolts. Remove the four bolts and washers on the rear.

Front Seats: Move to the front and slide the seat all the way to the rear.
Figure 4

Front Seats: Move to the front and slide the seat all the way to the rear. This will give you access to the single front bolt on each rail (red arrow). Again, it is a tight fit between the seat and bolt so make sure the 6mm Allen is properly seated before attempting to remove the bolts.

Front Seats: With the bolts removed you can tilt the seat back and disconnect the wiring attached to the seat components.
Figure 5

Front Seats: With the bolts removed you can tilt the seat back and disconnect the wiring attached to the seat components. This may vary depending on the type of seats in your vehicle. The rails will unbolt from the chassis and remain on the seats.

Front Seats - I like to pivot the seats and remove them underside first; this helps to prevent scratches caused by the rails.
Figure 6

Front Seats: I like to pivot the seats and remove them underside first; this helps to prevent scratches caused by the rails.

Rear Seat - To remove the rear seats, start with the seat folded into the down position and pull back the carpet on both the hatch and the rear upper seat.
Figure 7

Rear Seat: To remove the rear seats, start with the seat folded into the down position and pull back the carpet on both the hatch and the rear upper seat. There are two retaining bolts on each side of the seat back (red arrows).

Rear Seat -Use a 10mm wrench and remove the bolts form each side (red arrow).
Figure 8

Rear Seat: Use a 10mm wrench and remove the bolts form each side (red arrow). It is a tight fit so use care not to damage the leather.

Rear Seat -With the bolts removed you can easily remove the seat back out through the hatch.
Figure 9

Rear Seat: With the bolts removed you can easily remove the seat back out through the hatch.

Rear Seat: The lower section of the rear seat will come out as one piece.
Figure 10

Rear Seat: The lower section of the rear seat will come out as one piece. Start with the series of clips along the top of the seat (red arrow).

Rear Seat -Use a flathead screwdriver and carefully pry up and back the series of clips (red arrow) making sure not to damage the leather as you go.
Figure 11

Rear Seat: Use a flathead screwdriver and carefully pry up and back the series of clips (red arrow) making sure not to damage the leather as you go.

Rear Seat: When reinstalling the clips push on and clip over the small ridge on the metal (red arrow).
Figure 12

Rear Seat: When reinstalling the clips push on and clip over the small ridge on the metal (red arrow).

Rear Seat: Remove the caps and then use a 17mm socket to remove the two seat belts.
Figure 13

Rear Seat: Remove the caps and then use a 17mm socket to remove the two seat belts.

Rear Seat: Carefully pull the seat backing away from the chassis separating the glue as you go (red arrow).
Figure 14

Rear Seat: Carefully pull the seat backing away from the chassis separating the glue as you go (red arrow).

Rear Seat: Separate the lower seat cushion from the chassis and slip the leather out from under the carpet (red arrow).
Figure 15

Rear Seat: Separate the lower seat cushion from the chassis and slip the leather out from under the carpet (red arrow). The seat is now free and can be removed from the car. Installation is the reverse of removal.

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Comments and Suggestions:
Ed Comments: Solved. I got some new bolts, added some WD40 and in they went. Don't know whether it was the new threads on the new bolt or the WD40 that did the trick but I'm off to the RMV to get plates on the car. Thanks for your help - thread chaser was going to be the next step.
April 20, 2017
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the follow up. We appreciate it.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Ed Comments: Here's a diagram of the floating plate
April 11, 2017
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks, got it. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Ed Comments: Hoping my 968 cab is similar. Find it hard to get the bolts seated on the inboard side rails. They screw into a floating plate with threaded holes inside a 3/4 “ blind space. The float allows flexibility. However, they also make it a bear to get the bolt threads to line up perfectly. After one or two turns they bind just like they're cross threaded - probably are. Has anyone found a way around this? Ed Russell edrussel@aol.com
April 11, 2017
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: If they won't screw in by hand, the nut could be damaged from removal. Have you tried running a thread chaser through them? - Nick at Pelican Parts  

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Page last updated: Sun 6/25/2017 02:51:30 AM