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Pelican Technical Article:

Axle Removal

Steve Vernon

Time:

2 hours2 hrs

Tab:

$55 to $1,000

Talent:

***

Tools:

36mm socket, breaker bar, 8mm triple square, optional impact gun, floor jack, jack stands, wheel chocks, safety glasses, lug wrench, torque wrench

Applicable Models:

Porsche 944 Turbo (1986-89)

Parts Required:

Axle or CV joints

Hot Tip:

Make sure the socket is set before removing the axle bolts

Performance Gain:

Power to the road

Complementary Modification:

Change transmission fluid

Your drive axles or drive shafts can wear out over time or get damaged during use. The most common problem for drive axles is the tearing of the CV boot. This will cause the CV grease to be thrown out from the CV joint and allow contaminants in. Lack of grease or contaminants in the CV will quickly lead to failure of the joint. This article will not cover replacing or repacking the CV boot (please see one of our articles on repacking your CV joint and replacing the CV boot) but will cover the removal of the axles. Whether you are working on the boots or replacing the axles the drive axles will need to come out of the car. Porsche redesigned the CV joints on the 944, so make sure you check for the right one before ordering.

You will need to safely raise and support the rear of the vehicle to remove the axles, so please see our article on jacking up and supporting your Porsche 944 for additional assistance.

We will be removing the left side axle, but the right side is the same.

Depending on your vehicle there should be a 32mm or 36mm axle nut holding the axle to the flange (red arrow).
Figure 1

Depending on your vehicle there should be a 32mm or 36mm axle nut holding the axle to the flange (red arrow).

This nut is very difficult to remove.
Figure 2

This nut is very difficult to remove. While you should be able to break it loose with a long breaker bar and a pipe on the end, we ended up having to use an impact gun to the nuts off of ours. If you are trying it with a breaker bar make sure the socket does not slip off the nut (red arrow).

With the nut lose you can remove both the nut and the large washer from the axle (red arrow).
Figure 3

With the nut lose you can remove both the nut and the large washer from the axle (red arrow).

There are six 8mm triple square bolts that hold the axle to the transmission or differential flange.
Figure 4

There are six 8mm triple square bolts that hold the axle to the transmission or differential flange. These bolts usually get covered in oil, grease and assorted road debris. Make sure to clean the bolt heads. Be doubly sure that the socket is well seated in the bolt before attempting to remove it. You DO NOT want to strip these. They are easily strippable (red arrow). Remove the six bolts.

One of our bolt heads was stripped.
Figure 5

One of our bolt heads was stripped. We were fortunate enough to remove it by using an easy out (red arrow). Make sure to replace any bolts that are starting to get rounded.

There are three half-moon washers holding the bolts into the drive flange (red arrow).
Figure 6

There are three half-moon washers holding the bolts into the drive flange (red arrow). Make sure all of these are clean and included when reinstalling the axle.

With the bolts and washers removed the axle (red arrow) should easily come off the flange (yellow arrow).
Figure 7

With the bolts and washers removed the axle (red arrow) should easily come off the flange (yellow arrow).

If you live in a four-season climate you may need to use a puller to press the axle out from the wheel flange.
Figure 8

If you live in a four-season climate you may need to use a puller to press the axle out from the wheel flange. Or you can try installing the nut on the end of the axle to protect the threads and giving it a few gentle taps with a hammer (red arrow).

With the axle free of the corrosion, it will slip out from the hub (red arrow).
Figure 9

With the axle free of the corrosion, it will slip out from the hub (red arrow).

The axle is now free to be repainted.
Figure 10

The axle is now free to be repainted. Replace the CV joints, boots or just replace the complete axle. Installation is the reverse of removal. Make sure that the hardware is clean and properly torqued.



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