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WEVO Shifter Installation
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

WEVO Shifter Installation

Time:

2 hours2 hrs

Tab:

$615

Talent:

**

Tools:

24mm, 13mm, 10mm socket, 6mm, 3mm Allen, 10mm, 8mm wrench, flathead screwdriver, punch, small hammer

Applicable Models:

Porsche 911 (1965-74)
Porsche 911 Carrera (1974-89)
Porsche 911E (1969-73)
Porsche 911L (1968)
Porsche 911S (1967-77)
Porsche 911SC (1978-83)
Porsche 911T (1969-73)
Porsche 930 Turbo (1976-77, 1986-89)
Porsche 964 Carrera 2 (1990-94)
Porsche 964 Carrera 4 (1989-94)
Porsche 964 RS America (1993-94)
Porsche 964 Turbo (1991-94)
Porsche 993 Carrera (1995-98)
Porsche 993 Carrera 4 (1995-98)
Porsche 993 Carrera 4S (1996-98)
Porsche 993 Carrera S (1998)
Porsche 993 Targa (1996-98)
Porsche 993 Turbo (1996-97)
Porsche 996 Carrera (1999)
Porsche 996 Carrera 4 (1999)

Parts Required:

WEVO shifter

Hot Tip:

Take your time adjusting the connections until you get it perfect

Performance Gain:

Sharp, crisp, precision shifts

Complementary Modification:

Install a WEVO Precision Shift Joint

One of the most common upgrades for people who drive their 911's hard, DE or seriously track them is a WEVO shifter. Next time you are at the track look and ask around and you will probably find that most of the cars there are running WEVO products and almost all will have a WEVO shifter. While the stock set up is fine for most everyday driving there are certain areas that it lacks in, most notably centering in the 3-4 plane. Installation of the shifter will help eliminate the questions or doubts about what gear you have just selected and help avoid the "money shift". There is nothing worse than shifting from 5th to fourth, letting out the clutch and releasing that you have selected second by accident, and while the shifter is not cheap it certainly is well under the cost of a transmission rebuild.

The WEVO shifter is a beautifully made piece of precision engineering and a welcome addition to anyone who wants to drive their cars hard or eliminate some of the risk of missing a shift. The actual installation of the shifter is easy but you should add more time depending on how many things you need to move out of the way to get to the shifter. On our project car we have no center console.

Depending on what type of center console you have you will need to remove it first to get access to the shifter housings base.
Figure 1

Depending on what type of center console you have you will need to remove it first to get access to the shifter housings base. Pull up the rubber boot and check the condition of the shift rod and housing. You are going to be replacing most of the components but the WEVO shifter does use the original housing, thread pin, cap bolt, roll pin and washer. If you are transferring over the shift knob now is a good time to remove it from the rod.

The shifter comes complete with a new shift rod and crush sleeve (red arrows), sub-assembly top plate with two self-locking M6 K-nuts (yellow arrows) and a new shift rod bushing (blue arrow).
Figure 2

The shifter comes complete with a new shift rod and crush sleeve (red arrows), sub-assembly top plate with two self-locking M6 K-nuts (yellow arrows) and a new shift rod bushing (blue arrow).

The top plate sub-assembly comes complete with two K-nuts (red arrow).
Figure 3

The top plate sub-assembly comes complete with two K-nuts (red arrow). They will come attached to the top plate and it is important that you do not lose these when you remove them from the plate. The tensioning springs come preassembled (yellow arrows) and need no adjustment. The reverse lockout mechanism (blue arrow) is adjustable but you will not need to worry about this until later.

The pivot box, rod and ball socket bushing all come preassembled and lubricated and do not need any adjustments.
Figure 4

The pivot box, rod and ball socket bushing all come preassembled and lubricated and do not need any adjustments.

Place the shifter in third gear and remove the two 10mm bolts and washers and three 13mm bolts and washers (red arrows).
Figure 5

Place the shifter in third gear and remove the two 10mm bolts and washers and three 13mm bolts and washers (red arrows). Keep these as you are going to reuse them during reassembly.

Remove the shifter assembly from the tunnel.
Figure 6

Remove the shifter assembly from the tunnel. The shifter ball socket bushing (yellow arrow) should come out with the shift rod. If your bushing is really worn it may stay in the shift rod socket (red arrow). Use a flathead screwdriver and remove it from the socket.

Take the housing to your bench.
Figure 7

Take the housing to your bench. You are going to remove the two 10mm nuts from the top plate (red arrows). Be aware that the top plate is under pressure from the two springs below (yellow arrows) that have a surprising amount of force so use care and precaution when removing the top plate.

With the nuts removed you can remove the top plate (red arrow).
Figure 8

With the nuts removed you can remove the top plate (red arrow). You can see in this picture the length of the springs and how much force it takes to compress them.

Use a 24mm socket and remove the cap nut on the front of the housing (red arrow).
Figure 9

Use a 24mm socket and remove the cap nut on the front of the housing (red arrow).

Next use a 6mm Allen and remove the thread pin on the front of the housing; this pin holds the front of the pivot box in place and you are going to be reusing both of these parts.
Figure 10

Next use a 6mm Allen and remove the thread pin on the front of the housing; this pin holds the front of the pivot box in place and you are going to be reusing both of these parts.

Check the condition of the thread pin and clean it up before reinstalling in the WEVO pivot box.
Figure 11

Check the condition of the thread pin and clean it up before reinstalling in the WEVO pivot box. Note: on some older housing there will be a roll pin holding the front of the pivot box in place, you will need to use a punch and small hammer and tap this inwards to remove.

On the rear of the housing is a roll pin that holds the pivot box to the housing (red arrow).
Figure 12

On the rear of the housing is a roll pin that holds the pivot box to the housing (red arrow). You should be able to tap this pin in and free the pivot box.

If your roll pin is too long to clear the shift rod you can use a flathead screwdriver and remove the circlips (red arrow) that holds the shift rod to the pivot box to give you more room for the roll pin.
Figure 13

If your roll pin is too long to clear the shift rod you can use a flathead screwdriver and remove the circlips (red arrow) that holds the shift rod to the pivot box to give you more room for the roll pin.

With the roll pin removed you can remove the rod and pivot box from the housing.
Figure 14

With the roll pin removed you can remove the rod and pivot box from the housing.

You need to remove the washer from the rear of the original pivot box (red arrow) to use with the WEVO system.
Figure 15

You need to remove the washer from the rear of the original pivot box (red arrow) to use with the WEVO system.

Here are the four components that you will use when installing the WEVO shifter in the housing: the thread pin and cap nut along with the roll pin and washer.
Figure 16

Here are the four components that you will use when installing the WEVO shifter in the housing: the thread pin and cap nut along with the roll pin and washer.

The WEVO top plate must sit completely flush with the top of the housing so trial fit this first and file down any imperfections in the housing that might cause any small gaps between the housing the plate (red arrow).
Figure 17

The WEVO top plate must sit completely flush with the top of the housing so trial fit this first and file down any imperfections in the housing that might cause any small gaps between the housing the plate (red arrow).

Clean up the housing and insert the rear roll pin into the rear of the housing until you can place the washer over it with approximately 1mm of the roll pin sticking out into the inside of the housing (red arrow).
Figure 18

Clean up the housing and insert the rear roll pin into the rear of the housing until you can place the washer over it with approximately 1mm of the roll pin sticking out into the inside of the housing (red arrow).

Insert the shifter rod and pivot box assembly into the housing and insert the thread pin (red arrow) into the front of the housing until it engages the front of the pivot box and just snug it down; now you can tap the rest of the rear roll pin (yellow arrow) into the housing and pivot box.
Figure 19

Insert the shifter rod and pivot box assembly into the housing and insert the thread pin (red arrow) into the front of the housing until it engages the front of the pivot box and just snug it down; now you can tap the rest of the rear roll pin (yellow arrow) into the housing and pivot box.

Lower the top plate onto the housing so it sits flush and install the two M6 locking K-nuts.
Figure 20

Lower the top plate onto the housing so it sits flush and install the two M6 locking K-nuts. Apply a small amount of synthetic grease to the outside of the ball socket bushing. You now have the shift rod assembly together; you will use the thread pin on the front to adjust the feel and pressure on the pivot box. Before you install the housing into the tunnel you need to replace the shift tube bushing.

The bushing is in the L-shaped bracket (red arrow) that supports the shift tube.
Figure 21

The bushing is in the L-shaped bracket (red arrow) that supports the shift tube. You will need to remove the support bracket from the tunnel, to do this you will need to remove the ball socket on the end of the shift tube. Use a 2mm L-shaped Allen key and remove the conical screw on the base of the socket (yellow arrow) make sure to check with the size of your conical screw as they have changed over the years and you do not want to strip this out.

Remove the socket from the tube (red arrow) and slide the L-shaped bracket forward off the tube (yellow arrow).
Figure 22

Remove the socket from the tube (red arrow) and slide the L-shaped bracket forward off the tube (yellow arrow).

The old bushing will probably be very brittle and take a fair amount of work to remove from the bracket.
Figure 23

The old bushing will probably be very brittle and take a fair amount of work to remove from the bracket. If you use a flathead screwdriver you will be able to pry it out, just use care as it may crumble while doing this. Soak the new bushing in boiling water for 2 minutes and insert it into the bracket. Lightly grease the inside of the bushing and slide it over the shift tube and reinstall the ball socket on the end of the shift tube.

The cover between the rear tunnel needs to be opened to allow line up of the shifter in the 3rd and 4th gear plane.
Figure 24

The cover between the rear tunnel needs to be opened to allow line up of the shifter in the 3rd and 4th gear plane. Note that we have installed the WEVO PSJ and billeted clamp to further improved the shifting precision. Ensure that the transmission is still in third gear and loosen the conical screw holding the coupler to the input shaft on the transmission (red arrow).

Install the shifter assembly over the tunnel placing the socket bushing into the cup; the shifter will be aligned in the 3rd and 4th gear plane and the two 10mm bolt holes on the bushing bracket should line up with the housing while in this position (red arrows), insert the two 10mm bolts and tighten them down.
Figure 25

Install the shifter assembly over the tunnel placing the socket bushing into the cup; the shifter will be aligned in the 3rd and 4th gear plane and the two 10mm bolt holes on the bushing bracket should line up with the housing while in this position (red arrows), insert the two 10mm bolts and tighten them down. Line up the rest of the housing with the 13mm bolt holes (yellow arrow, one shown) and insert the three 13mm bolts and tighten down. Tighten down the conical screw on the shift tube to coupler.

Pull the gear lever back into the neutral position, the designed position in neutral is for the spherical ball on the bottom of the gear lever to be vertically below the pivot axis in the pivot box; this will be the first indication of correct adjustment.
Figure 26

Pull the gear lever back into the neutral position, the designed position in neutral is for the spherical ball on the bottom of the gear lever to be vertically below the pivot axis in the pivot box; this will be the first indication of correct adjustment. Swing the gear lever over to attempt to select reverse. The steel button on the side of the gear
lever should just hit the nose of the reverse lock-out plunger (yellow arrow). The reverse lock-out plunger should not be aimed at the center of the button, but rather at the very back edge (yellow arrow), so that a deliberate movement towards reverse is required to hit and depress the reverse lock-out plunger to allow access to reverse. With the hex bolt in the pinch clamp all tight, check that 5th gear can be selected and that moving the gear lever out of 5th gear into neutral can be achieved cleanly: without being fouled by the reverse lock-out plunger. The gear lever will try to stand vertical as soon as 5th gear is cleared, positioning itself in neutral of the 3rd and 4th gear plane. If the gear lever is set too far forwards, you will not be able to catch and depress the Reverse lock-out plunger, if the gear lever is set too far back, you will not be able to cleanly select neutral from 5th without fouling the reverse lock-out plunger. Try to make all changes with 3rd gear selected in the transmission, this way the radial adjustment set initially will be maintained while you are making small adjustments to the axial setting. Finally the reverse lock-out plunger can be adjusted for protrusion from the top plate; this can be used as a fine adjustment to allow you to achieve the correct feel for selecting reverse from neutral. The kit is supplied with the reverse lock-out plunger in the designed position and this should work well for most applications. The reverse lock-out plunger system has a locking set screw installed from the outer edge of the top plate (red arrow). Loosen the lock-out plunger with a 5mm Allen key, the plunger body is also threaded and can be rotated with your fingers, either inwards or out to change the setting of the plunger. In the desired position, lock the set screw to complete the adjustment. Run the shifter through the gears several time and be prepared to make small adjustments


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