Porsche Parts Catalog Porsche Accessories Catalog Porsche Technical Articles Porsche Tech Forums
 
  Search our site:    
View Recent Cars  |   Cart  | Project List | Order Status | Help    
 >  >
Kirk Engines Valve Adjustment Procedure
 
Bookmark and Share

Pelican Technical Article:

Kirk Engines Valve Adjustment Procedure

Steve Vernon

Time:

3 hours3 hrs

Tab:

$100

Talent:

**

Tools:

Kirk Engines Valve Lash tool, 13mm wrench, torque wrench

Applicable Models:

Porsche 911 (1965-89)
Porsche 930 Turbo (1976-89)

Parts Required:

Valve cover gaskets, 13mm Nylex nuts

Hot Tip:

The S-hose will be full of oil

Performance Gain:

Reduced engine noise, longer valve train life

Complementary Modification:

Change oil filter

One of the most common and expensive maintenance tasks on the 911 is the adjustment of the valves. I recommended that the valves be adjusted about every 10,000 miles on the later model 911s (1978 on), and about every 6,000 miles for cars manufactured prior to 1978. If your valve clearances are too tight, then your valves might not be closing all the way. So, you will not obtain optimum performance. Likewise, if the clearances are too loose, your valves will not open all the way, and you will also have a very noisy valve train.

For anyone who has performed a valve adjustment on one's own car you know how difficult it can be working in such a confined space. Between holding the screwdriver, feeler gauge and wrench, then trying to loosen and tighten everything in precise amounts, it can get very frustrating. Kirk Engines has developed a tool that does away with the feeler gauge and makes the whole process simpler and easier while maintaining the exact tolerances needed.

The tool is based on knowing the rocker arm lash adjuster screw pitch (1.0 mm/rev) and the desired clearance (.1 mm). Knowledge of this relationship allows the amount of turn required to attain the .1 mm clearance from a zero lash baseline to be known. This is the principle upon which this valve lash adjuster tool works, i.e., just like a micrometer. With the adjuster screw lock nut loosened, the tool is placed on the rocker arm with the driver bit engaging the lash adjuster screw. The knob is rotated clockwise to get a metal-to-metal, zero clearance baseline. At this point, the moveable pointer is then rotated to align with the baseline mark reference. The knob is then rotated counterclockwise to the .1 mm reference line and proper clearance is established. Tighten the lock nut, and clearance is dead-on the money. And should tightening the lock nut cause the adjuster to rotate (as it sometimes does), it is easily seen on the adjuster knob and can be compensated for.

Before adjusting the valves, make sure the engine is stone cold. Adjusting the valves on even a warm engine will result in inaccurate settings. Don't start the engine for five hours before adjusting the valves; letting it sit overnight is better.

The engine compartment can be a very tight space to work in on the 911. Any extra room you can make will come in very handy. The nice thing about the Kirk Engines tool is that it eliminates one of the tools you usually have to be fiddling around with by eliminating the feeler gauge. This not only frees up some room to work it also frees up one of your hands. The first step in the valve adjustment process is to make as much room to work as possible; do this by disconnecting the spark plug wires, remove the distributor cap and remove the wires and cap from the engine. You will need to remove the plugs wires to get the valve covers off and remove the distributor cap to check TDC, so you might as well get them out of your way. Do not remove the wires from the cap. Make sure if your wires are not numbered, to number them to the corresponding cylinder before removal.

Drain the oil from the engine and sump. You are going to be removing the lower valve covers. If you do not drain the oil you will have a mess.

Begin by working on a stone cold engine.
Figure 1

Begin by working on a stone cold engine. The tolerances are very precise and any heat in the engine will cause thermal expansion. Let the engine sit overnight to cool if possible. Number and remove the spark plug wires and distributor cap (red arrows). This will give you more room to work and allow the intake valve covers to be removed. Next, use a 24mm wrench to turn the nut on the alternator (yellow arrow). This will turn the belt and the crank.

You need the engine to be at Top Dead Center or TDC (red arrow).
Figure 2

You need the engine to be at Top Dead Center or TDC (red arrow). The pulley is marked in several places. TDC (red arrow) as well as 5 degree before top dead center (which is the mark just to the right of the arrow in the photo and is used for timing) along with every 120 degrees. You will be turning the crankshaft 120 degrees to move to the next cylinder for adjustment. Note: there is a mark for 33 degree before top dead center for timing purposes. Make sure you note it and do not try and perform a valve adjust there. If the belt does not turn the crank when turning the nut, apply pressure to the right side of the belt (yellow arrow) or squeeze it together with your free hand.

Since you have removed the distributor cap you can make sure that the number 1 cylinder is at TDC by having the rotor line up with the mark on the distributor (red arrow).
Figure 3

Since you have removed the distributor cap you can make sure that the number 1 cylinder is at TDC by having the rotor line up with the mark on the distributor (red arrow). If they are not lined up then the motor is 180 degrees out and the cylinder is not on the compression stroke and the motor needs to be turned until they line up. When the engine is at TDC for piston #1, it's time to adjust the valves for that cylinder. Both the intake and the exhaust valves can be adjusted at the same time. The intake valves are located on the top of the engine inside the engine compartment, and the exhaust valves are located underneath the engine.

Remove all the 13mm Nylex nuts from the intake and exhaust covers on both sides of the engine (red arrows).
Figure 4

Remove all the 13mm Nylex nuts from the intake and exhaust covers on both sides of the engine (red arrows). Depending on which exhaust you are running on your vehicle you may need a combination of extensions and universal joints. Remove the old gasket and clean up the mating surfaces on the heads and valve covers.

This photo shows the rocker arm where the Kirk tool sits along with the adjustment screw and locking nut.
Figure 5

This photo shows the rocker arm where the Kirk tool sits along with the adjustment screw and locking nut. The adjustment mechanism will sit over the adjustment screw (green arrow) and leave clearance for tightening the nut (yellow arrow). For each valve, loosen the 13mm retaining nut around the adjustment screw, and turn the screw back counter clockwise. Now, place the Kirk Engines valve adjustment over the adjustment screw until the flathead section in the tool sits securely in the head of the adjustment screw.

Use the adjustment knob (yellow arrow) on the rear of the tool to adjust the height of the tool post (red arrow) so that the blade of the tool sits flush and level in the adjustment screw (green arrow).
Figure 6

Use the adjustment knob (yellow arrow) on the rear of the tool to adjust the height of the tool post (red arrow) so that the blade of the tool sits flush and level in the adjustment screw (green arrow).

With the tool firmly on the rocker and valve rotate the knob clockwise until you get a metal-to-metal, zero clearance base line between the Elephant foot and valve.
Figure 7

With the tool firmly on the rocker and valve rotate the knob clockwise until you get a metal-to-metal, zero clearance base line between the Elephant foot and valve. At this point, the moveable pointer is then rotated to align with the baseline mark reference (green arrow).

Next, rotate the knob counterclockwise so the .
Figure 8

Next, rotate the knob counterclockwise so the .1 mm reference line (yellow arrow) is lined up with the witness mark (green arrow) and proper clearance is established. Tighten the lock nut, and clearance is dead-on the money. And should tightening the lock nut cause the adjuster to rotate (as it sometimes does), it is easily seen on the adjuster knob and can be compensated for.

There is enough clearance between the tool and the nut to easily get a wrench in (yellow arrow).
Figure 9

There is enough clearance between the tool and the nut to easily get a wrench in (yellow arrow). You will be holding the knob on the tool in place at the .1mm mark while tightening (red arrow) to make sure the adjuster does not move. Now, rotate the engine crankshaft 120 degrees using the fan pulley. There is a mark on the crankshaft engine pulley that will indicate the 120-degree position. Now, repeat the adjustment procedure for cylinder number six. When finished, rotate the engine another 120 degrees, and adjust the valves for cylinder number 2. Repeat the rotation and adjustment procedures for the remaining valves following the engine firing order 1-6-2-4-3-5. When you are finished, rotate the engine back to TDC for cylinder number one, and the rotor on the distributor should be pointing at the notch in the housing.

Install a new gasket (red arrow) on each valve cover.
Figure 10

Install a new gasket (red arrow) on each valve cover. Make sure that you have cleaned both surfaces of the heads and valve cover.

Install all new 13mm Nylex nuts on the valve covers.
Figure 11

Install all new 13mm Nylex nuts on the valve covers. Do not over tighten the covers; they only require 8 ft-lbs of torque. Install the wires and distributor cap and be SURE to refill the motor with oil.

Bookmark and Share
Comments and Suggestions:
Uh oh Comments: Picture are great but need a video..... WHERE IS THE VIDEO.????
August 25, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: One day Pelican may have one. Right now the photos are all we have. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
jpilcher Comments: Will this tool work on a turbo motor? Particularly Exhaust Valve 1, is the wastegate in the way?
October 13, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: The procedure is similar. You will have to remove any components in your way. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
911Maverick Comments: I used this tool to do my first valve adjustment on my 86 911. The concept is excellent and I am sure since it was my first valve job ever that there was some user error. I will say that the fit between the blade of the tool and the valve screw is so tight that you may not be able to get it in. I was unable to get the fit correct on a couple cylinders and only after a massive amount of expletives I managed to get the screw turned with the tool. I understand the need for a tight fit but creating a bit more of a slip fit would allow much easier use. After firing up my car there is some valve noise and I know its coming from the valves that were difficult to engage.
April 22, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the additional info and feedback. We appreciate it.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Liam Comments: Please put together a parts list/package along with the tool; I would like to order these items as a one shot deal, and if possible, you could create 2 packages, one with new plugs/cap/rotor/gaskets/nuts/the tool and maybe plug wires, also, and one with just the basics - valve cover gaskets/nuts/and the tool. Thanks Pelican!! This is a great article and I'm looking forward to performing it myself.
April 3, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I will be sure the right people get this comment and create the kit. Thanks! - Nick at Pelican Parts  

  Search our site:    

View Cart & CheckOut | Project List | Order Status |  Help    

 

[Home] [Customer Service] [Shopping Cart] [Project/Wish List]
  [Privacy Statement]  [Contact Us] [About Us] [Shipping] [Careers]

Copyright © Pelican Parts Inc. -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page

Page last updated: Mon 12/5/2016 02:46:25 AM