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Rear Shock and Spring Replacement
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

Rear Shock and Spring Replacement

Jared Fenton

Time:

5 hours5 hrs

Tab:

$300 to $600

Tools:

Spring compressors, 13, 16mm drivers,

Applicable Models:

Porsche 955 Cayenne (2004-08)
Porsche 955 Cayenne GTS (2008)
Porsche 955 Cayenne S (2003-08)
Porsche 955 Cayenne Turbo (2003-08)
Porsche 955 Cayenne Turbo S (2006)

Parts Required:

New shocks, springs, mounts

Hot Tip:

Use caution when compressing springs

Performance Gain:

Better handling

Complementary Modification:

Replace rear sway bar bushings

Replacing the rear shock and spring is one of the more challenging projects for the do-it-yourselfer. This article is designed to go over the steps involved with changing the rear shocks and springs. Keep in mind that you will need a set of spring compressors to complete the job. This is a potentially dangerous operation. Take your time and read the directions here and also the manufacturer's instructions when using. It also is a good idea to invest or rent a quality set of compressors. I have had lesser quality compressors crack in the past.

Begin by jacking up the car; support it on jack stands and remove the rear wheels (see our article on Jacking up your Cayenne for more information.).

Begin by removing the sway bar end link (green arrow).
Figure 1

Begin by removing the sway bar end link (green arrow). The links are bolted to the sway bar at the top and the shock absorber mount at the bottom.

Loosen the 18mm nut and bolt (green arrows) holding the end link to the bottom shock mount.
Figure 2

Loosen the 18mm nut and bolt (green arrows) holding the end link to the bottom shock mount. You'll likely need a breaker bar as this is torqued down to 90Nm (67 ft/lbs.). Remove the bolt enough to allow just the end link to come off.

Place a floor jack with a block of wood under the control arm.
Figure 3

Place a floor jack with a block of wood under the control arm. The idea here is to jack up the strut assembly slightly to take some of the load off the sway bar before sliding it off the bottom bolt. Jack slowly and carefully.

Now move to the upper connection on the end link.
Figure 4

Now move to the upper connection on the end link.

Hold the shaft of the upper end link ball joint by inserting a T40 Torx driver while loosening the 16mm nut.
Figure 5

Hold the shaft of the upper end link ball joint by inserting a T40 Torx driver while loosening the 16mm nut. Once the nut is removed, remove the end link from the car.

Now remove the bolt holding the shock absorber in place (green arrow) and separate the wheel hub from the shock absorber.
Figure 6

Now remove the bolt holding the shock absorber in place (green arrow) and separate the wheel hub from the shock absorber. You may need to use a pry bar to nudge the shock loose.

Shown here are the four 16mm bolts holding the upper shock mount to the chassis (green arrows).
Figure 7

Shown here are the four 16mm bolts holding the upper shock mount to the chassis (green arrows). These will need to be removed.

Gaining access to the bolts is a bit easier using extensions and a u-joint as shown here.
Figure 8

Gaining access to the bolts is a bit easier using extensions and a u-joint as shown here.

Once the bolts are removed, carefully lower the whole shock assembly down from inside the car.
Figure 9

Once the bolts are removed, carefully lower the whole shock assembly down from inside the car. You'll also need to rotate the whole assembly to clear the control arms.

Remove the four 10mm nuts holding the upper mount to the shock assembly.
Figure 10

Remove the four 10mm nuts holding the upper mount to the shock assembly. Inspect the mount for wear along the rubber bushings. They should be stiff with no cracks. If they are damaged or loose, replace them.

Now comes the part that can be dangerous, compressing the coil springs.
Figure 11

Now comes the part that can be dangerous, compressing the coil springs. This is done by installing a set of compressors as shown here. You want to compress the load of the springs so that the retaining collar can be removed. Install the compressors at 180 degrees to each other. This allows them to apply equal pressure to either side of the spring. Work in small increments on one side and then the other until you can see the edge of the coil spring come free of the retaining collar.

Loosen and remove the 18mm nut holding the retaining collar to the shock absorber.
Figure 12

Loosen and remove the 18mm nut holding the retaining collar to the shock absorber. You'll find that the shock absorber will tend to twist as you turn the nut. There are a few different ways around this. You can use an impact wrench which will simply zap the nut off. You can also hold the shock rod by the tab on the top if you have a specialized socket that allows you access inside. I don't usually recommend grasping the shock rod itself down below with a pair of vice grips, but on a set of old shocks, it should be fine enough.

Pull the retaining collar up and off the shock.
Figure 13

Pull the retaining collar up and off the shock. It may take a little effort for the dust cover assembly below to pop free of the collar. Now remove the compressed spring from the shock. Remove the lower spring mount collar from the shock.

Pull the rubber spring mounts off the upper and lower collars and inspect them for wear or cracks.
Figure 14

Pull the rubber spring mounts off the upper and lower collars and inspect them for wear or cracks. If they are damaged, replace them.

Assembly of the new shock absorber begins with seating the lower, smaller rubber spring mount in the plastic collar.
Figure 15

Assembly of the new shock absorber begins with seating the lower, smaller rubber spring mount in the plastic collar.

Line up the markings on both the rubber mount and collar (green arrows) and press the rubber mount into place.
Figure 16

Line up the markings on both the rubber mount and collar (green arrows) and press the rubber mount into place.

Place the plastic spacer ring (green arrow) inside the retaining collar (yellow arrow).
Figure 17

Place the plastic spacer ring (green arrow) inside the retaining collar (yellow arrow).

Now place the upper, larger rubber mount inside the collar.
Figure 18

Now place the upper, larger rubber mount inside the collar. Make sure that the open area of the rubber (green arrow) fits over the two ribs cast into the retaining collar (yellow arrows).

You'll now want to inspect the bump stop.
Figure 19

You'll now want to inspect the bump stop. This is done by turning the dust cover over and pressing the white plastic arms inward (green arrows) and sliding the dust cover lip (yellow arrow) out and under each finger.

Pull the retaining ring out of the dust cover.
Figure 20

Pull the retaining ring out of the dust cover.

Now fully compress the dust cover until you can visually inspect the bump stop (green arrow) for any cracks or damage.
Figure 21

Now fully compress the dust cover until you can visually inspect the bump stop (green arrow) for any cracks or damage. Replace if needed. If reusing, carefully place the retaining ring back inside and fit the dust cover edge over the fingers.

Shown here is the base of the shock absorber.
Figure 22

Shown here is the base of the shock absorber. It is helpful to have a friend help you hold the shock assembly or secure it in a vise when assembling.

Place the lower rubber spring mount on the shock absorber taking care to keep the rubber seated and aligned (green arrows).
Figure 23

Place the lower rubber spring mount on the shock absorber taking care to keep the rubber seated and aligned (green arrows).

Now lower the compressed spring down over the shock absorber.
Figure 24

Now lower the compressed spring down over the shock absorber. The smaller end goes on the bottom. Make sure that the end of the coil spring (green arrow) fits into the end of the rubber mount (yellow arrow).

Now pop the lip of the dust cover (green arrow) into the inside of the upper retaining collar (yellow arrow).
Figure 25

Now pop the lip of the dust cover (green arrow) into the inside of the upper retaining collar (yellow arrow).

Now fit the dust cover and retaining collar over the shock.
Figure 26

Now fit the dust cover and retaining collar over the shock. Make sure that the end of the coil spring (green arrow) fits into the end of the upper rubber mount (yellow arrow). Note that the dust cover has been omitted in thisPicture for clarity.

Pull the lower edge of the dust cover (yellow arrows) down and over the lower edge of the shock (yellow arrow).
Figure 27

Pull the lower edge of the dust cover (yellow arrows) down and over the lower edge of the shock (yellow arrow). As you pull it down, it will lock into place.

Now use a new self-locking nut to secure the retaining collar to the shock absorber.
Figure 28

Now use a new self-locking nut to secure the retaining collar to the shock absorber. At this point, use an impact wrench to zap the nut down. Note: You may find that there are not enough threads for the nut to catch. In this instance, you will need to compress the spring further until enough threads pass through the collar.

Fit the upper mount assembly to the shock absorber.
Figure 29

Fit the upper mount assembly to the shock absorber. Now install the four 13 mm nuts and torque them to 30Nm (22 ft/lbs.). Place the shock absorber assembly up into the car. Fit the four 16mm bolts securing the shock in place and torque them to 60Nm (44 ft/lbs.).

You'll now need to get the end of the shock absorber (green arrow) up into the pocket on the wheel hub (yellow arrow).
Figure 30

You'll now need to get the end of the shock absorber (green arrow) up into the pocket on the wheel hub (yellow arrow). This may be difficult depending on the shock manufacturer. In some cases, you can simply pull the wheel hub down enough to line up the through bolt.

In some cases, you may find that disconnecting the upper control link (green arrow) and lower control link (yellow arrow) from the wheel hub helps to provide enough travel (See our article on replacing rear control arms for more information.
Figure 31

In some cases, you may find that disconnecting the upper control link (green arrow) and lower control link (yellow arrow) from the wheel hub helps to provide enough travel (See our article on replacing rear control arms for more information.).

One other method is to compress the end of the shock (green arrow) just enough with a block of wood and a floor jack.
Figure 32

One other method is to compress the end of the shock (green arrow) just enough with a block of wood and a floor jack. Carefully jack the end of the shock up enough to slide the bolt though (yellow arrow). Take care not to jack the car up off the jack stand when doing this. Once the bolt is through, torque the nut and bolt to 90Nm (67 ft/lbs.).

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Comments and Suggestions:
911nick Comments: This is a fantastic guide for replacing rear shocks. When will the front struts DIY be available?
June 8, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: We do not have a front shock how to on the books as of yet, I will see if we can shoot one soon! - Casey at Pelican Parts  

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