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Replacing Radiator Hoses
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

Replacing Radiator Hoses

Jared Fenton

Time:

2 hours2 hrs

Tab:

$100

Talent:

***

Tools:

Pliers, large container for coolant, shop rags

Applicable Models:

Porsche 955 Cayenne S (2003-08)
Porsche 955 Cayenne Turbo (2003-08)

Parts Required:

New radiator hoses, coolant

Hot Tip:

Take your time and make sure the hoses are seated correctly.

Performance Gain:

Better cooling, no more leaks

Complementary Modification:

Replace air filters

Over time, radiator hoses can crack and develop weak spots due to both pressure and temperature. It is a good idea to periodically inspect both hoses for wear. A blown radiator hose can leave you stranded. Taking five minutes with a flashlight can save you hundreds in towing and repair costs.

I recommend inspecting your radiator hoses once a year. As they age, they have a tendency to get hard and brittle. When you gently squeeze a hose, it should be relatively soft and easy to indent with your hand. It shouldn't feel like it's brittle or crunching when you squeeze it. It should spring back to its original shape pretty quickly after being compressed. If it feels very hard, then it might be time to replace it. If there is a bulge in the hose, or any type of crack in the surface of the hose, then you should replace it as well. Also check for wetness or leaks around where the hoses create their connections: that is a sign that the hose should be replaced. Some hoses may be coated with some left-over cosmoline from the factory. This is a yellowish, semi-hard film that acts as a protectant. Don't' mistake this for bad radiator hoses.

Replacing the radiator hoses requires draining the coolant from the engine. Additionally, you will need to bleed the cooling system of all air prior to adding adding new coolant. See our article: Coolant Flush and Replacement for more information.

Removing the upper radiator hose requires removing the front ducting on both air filter housings (green arrow, left side is similar).
Figure 1

Removing the upper radiator hose requires removing the front ducting on both air filter housings (green arrow, left side is similar). Locate the two plastic bolts that hold the intake tube to the air filter housing (yellow arrows). Rotate the two plastic bolts until the tabs on the housing and also the bolts line up. Then pull the bolts up and out of the housing. At this point, disconnect the MAF sensor wiring (blue arrow) and remove the front duct from the throttle body. See our article on Throttle Body Cleaning for more information.

Shown here is a close-up of the tabs on both the plastic bolts (green arrow) and also the housing (yellow arrow).
Figure 2

Shown here is a close-up of the tabs on both the plastic bolts (green arrow) and also the housing (yellow arrow).

Both radiator hoses (green arrows) connect to the engine at the thermostat housing.
Figure 3

Both radiator hoses (green arrows) connect to the engine at the thermostat housing. In some cases, you can access the hose clamps with the throttle body and wiring in place. If not, you'll need to remove the throttle body. See our article on Throttle Body Cleaning for more information.

Once the air intake ducting is removed, you'll have access to the upper radiator hose (green arrow) as shown here.
Figure 4

Once the air intake ducting is removed, you'll have access to the upper radiator hose (green arrow) as shown here.

Use a pair of needle-nose pliers to pull the retaining clamp (green arrow) up.
Figure 5

Use a pair of needle-nose pliers to pull the retaining clamp (green arrow) up. This small piece of wire holds the radiator hose into the radiator neck. Once the clamp is moved, pull the hose out of the radiator. Be prepared for a small amount coolant to spill out. Before installing the new hose, press the clamp back down into the groove on the radiator neck. Make sure it is in place correctly, then press the end of the new hose into the radiator neck. You should feel a small click on both sides of the hose once installed correctly. Failure to install the hose correctly will result in a massive coolant leak when you start the engine as the pressure can blow the hose out of the radiator.

Now move to the engine side of the hose and compress the two ends of the hose clamp (green arrows) holding the upper hose to the thermostat housing.
Figure 6

Now move to the engine side of the hose and compress the two ends of the hose clamp (green arrows) holding the upper hose to the thermostat housing. Once the ends are compressed, pull the clamp back off the neck of the housing. Now carefully pull the hose off. Carefully pull the hose off. In some cases, you may need to "walk" the hose off the fitting using a small screwdriver. Take care not to damage the neck of the housing. You will also want to clean off any corrosion that may have built up on the neck.

Shown here is the lower radiator hose on the left side of the engine (green arrow).
Figure 7

Shown here is the lower radiator hose on the left side of the engine (green arrow). Follow the hose down to the connection on the bottom of the radiator.

Pull the wire retaining clamp (green arrow) up and pull the lower radiator hose out of the radiator neck.
Figure 8

Pull the wire retaining clamp (green arrow) up and pull the lower radiator hose out of the radiator neck.

Shown here is a view of the lower radiator connection as viewed from below.
Figure 9

Shown here is a view of the lower radiator connection as viewed from below. Note the end of the wire clamp (green arrow). This bend acts as a stop when you pull the wire up.

As before, move to the engine side of the hose and compress the two ends of the hose clamp (green arrows) holding the lower hose to the thermostat housing.
Figure 10

As before, move to the engine side of the hose and compress the two ends of the hose clamp (green arrows) holding the lower hose to the thermostat housing. Once the ends are compressed, pull the clamp back off the neck of the housing. Now carefully pull the hose off. Installation is the reverse of removal

Once the new hoses are installed, use a vacuum bleeder as shown here to evacuate the air from the system and also to fill it.
Figure 11

Once the new hoses are installed, use a vacuum bleeder as shown here to evacuate the air from the system and also to fill it. Whichever bleeder you use, follow the manufacturer's directions.

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Comments and Suggestions:
mike Comments: What are the manufacturer's directions to bleed the system using Airlift bleeder?
April 3, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Yes. Most manufacturers recommend them now. - Nick at Pelican Parts  

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