Parts Catalog Accessories Catalog Tech Info Tech Forums
 
  Search our site:    
View Recent Cars  |   Cart  | Project List | Order Status | Help    
 >  >
Intake Manifold Removal
 
Bookmark and Share

Pelican Technical Article:

Intake Manifold Removal

Steve Vernon

Time:

1 hour1 hr

Tab:

$100

Talent:

**

Tools:

T30, T40 Torx, 16mm (2) sockets or wrenches

Applicable Models:

Porsche 955 Cayenne GTS (2008-10)
Porsche 955 Cayenne S (2008-10)
Porsche 955 Cayenne Turbo (2008-10)
Porsche 955 Cayenne Turbo S (2009-10)
Porsche 970 Panamera 4S (2010-14)
Porsche 970 Panamera GTS (2013-14)
Porsche 970 Panamera S (2010-14)
Porsche 970 Panamera Turbo (2010-14)
Porsche 970 Panamera Turbo Executive (2014)
Porsche 970 Panamera Turbo S (2012-14)
Porsche 970 Panamera Turbo S Executive (2014)

Parts Required:

Gaskets

Hot Tip:

Work carefully on the plastic pieces

Performance Gain:

No vacuum leaks

Complementary Modification:

Oil and filter

The intake manifold on the Cayenne motor is a large plastic piece that contains the variable intake system. While the internals of the manifold are usually good for the life of the vehicle, there are a few problem the manifold can present. The first is vacuum leaks. If your manifold is leaking from the intake gaskets (please see our article on testing for vacuum leaks) then you will need to remove the manifold to replace the gaskets. There are eight separate gaskets. One for each intake runner so be sure to order the correct amount.

You also need to remove the intake manifold to perform all kinds of other jobs on the vehicle from injector replacement to installing a new starter motor. This article will show you how to remove the intake manifold to get at other components on the engine. Remember to always carefully check the condition of the intake manifold gaskets and replace them as needed.

You will need to remove the engine covers before you can remove the intake manifold, so please see our article on engine cover removal before starting this job.

When you remove the engine covers it will include removal of the AOS (air oil separator) hose (yellow arrow).
Figure 1

When you remove the engine covers it will include removal of the AOS (air oil separator) hose (yellow arrow). You are going to remove the intake manifold with the throttle body attached (red arrow).

First, remove the cross over hose (red arrow) from the two separators on top of each cylinder head (yellow arrows)
Figure 2

First, remove the cross over hose (red arrow) from the two separators on top of each cylinder head (yellow arrows)

If you are going to be working on your Cayenne, it is a very good idea to make your own homemade AOS hose clip separator.
Figure 3

If you are going to be working on your Cayenne, it is a very good idea to make your own homemade AOS hose clip separator. All of the AOS hoses on the Cayenne are the same size so this will work for all of them. Take a small but thick wire and bend it to the size of the inside opening of the hoses and file both points down so they will slip in easier (red arrows).

You can now safely slip your homemade tool between the plastic clip on the hoses and the housings and remove the hoses without worrying about breaking very expensive hoses.
Figure 4

You can now safely slip your homemade tool between the plastic clip on the hoses and the housings and remove the hoses without worrying about breaking very expensive hoses.

The tool (red arrow) makes removing the hoses safe and easy and should be kept handy in your toolbox.
Figure 5

The tool (red arrow) makes removing the hoses safe and easy and should be kept handy in your toolbox.

With the crossover hose off, inspect it.
Figure 6

With the crossover hose off, inspect it. If it looks like this (red arrow) or has any buildup of sludge you are going too long between oil changes.

There are two covers on each valve cover: one that is the AOS (red arrow) and one that protects the coils (yellow arrow).
Figure 7

There are two covers on each valve cover: one that is the AOS (red arrow) and one that protects the coils (yellow arrow). Both sides are removed in the same fashion with a few differences pointed out here. The right side cover has a torque strut (green arrow) mounted to it that makes access to the Torx screw under it difficult. If you do not have a short Torx driver you can remove the strut.

Use two 16mm sockets or wrenches and remove the two nuts and bolts mounted to the engine and the single bolt mounting it to the chassis (red arrows).
Figure 8

Use two 16mm sockets or wrenches and remove the two nuts and bolts mounted to the engine and the single bolt mounting it to the chassis (red arrows).

Remove the six T30 Torx bolts (red arrows) on each side and slip the right side AOS up and out.
Figure 9

Remove the six T30 Torx bolts (red arrows) on each side and slip the right side AOS up and out.

The Torx bolts on the AOS will stay with the piece; you do not need to unscrew them completely out just enough so they are clear of the valve cover below.
Figure 10

The Torx bolts on the AOS will stay with the piece; you do not need to unscrew them completely out just enough so they are clear of the valve cover below.

Always plug the openings into the valve cover right away (red arrows); if you drop something in there you are going to have a really big job getting it out.
Figure 11

Always plug the openings into the valve cover right away (red arrows); if you drop something in there you are going to have a really big job getting it out.

On the left bank AOS there is a small E10 bolt holding a bracket line on at the rear of the coil cover that you will need to remove as well as a line connected under the cover.
Figure 12

On the left bank AOS there is a small E10 bolt holding a bracket line on at the rear of the coil cover that you will need to remove as well as a line connected under the cover. Lift up the cover and separate the line (red arrow) by squeezing in the plastic clip and wiggling it off.

Just set the line out of the way (red arrow).
Figure 13

Just set the line out of the way (red arrow). Do not forget to plug the holes on the left bank as well (yellow arrows).

There is an EVAP line that runs along the right side of the manifold that you will want to move out of the way to get access to the mounting bolts.
Figure 14

There is an EVAP line that runs along the right side of the manifold that you will want to move out of the way to get access to the mounting bolts. Disconnect the EVAP line behind the manifold on the firewall (red arrow). Squeeze the connector in and pull it off. Sometimes you have to push it a little further on first then squeeze and pull.

Lift the solenoid for the EVAP line beside the throttle body up and off its mount (red arrow), and disconnect the electrical connection (yellow arrow).
Figure 15

Lift the solenoid for the EVAP line beside the throttle body up and off its mount (red arrow), and disconnect the electrical connection (yellow arrow).

Disconnect the harness from the throttle body (red arrow).
Figure 16

Disconnect the harness from the throttle body (red arrow).

Disconnect the EVAP line from the front of the manifold just to the left and below the throttle body (red arrow).
Figure 17

Disconnect the EVAP line from the front of the manifold just to the left and below the throttle body (red arrow).

Disconnect the connection for the PCV heater (red arrow).
Figure 18

Disconnect the connection for the PCV heater (red arrow).

Move the EVAP line (red arrow) out of the way so you can easily get access to the manifold mounting bolts (yellow arrow).
Figure 19

Move the EVAP line (red arrow) out of the way so you can easily get access to the manifold mounting bolts (yellow arrow). Make sure to place this line back before reinstalling and tightening the manifold when reinstalling it.

Use a T40 Torx and loosen the ten intake mounting bolts (red arrows).
Figure 20

Use a T40 Torx and loosen the ten intake mounting bolts (red arrows). The bolts will stay in the mounting holes in the manifold once they are loose from the engine.

Lift the manifold up and slide it forward enough to get access to the rear.
Figure 21

Lift the manifold up and slide it forward enough to get access to the rear.

There is a small vacuum line (yellow arrow) and wiring connection (red arrow) that you need to disconnect from the rear of the manifold.
Figure 22

There is a small vacuum line (yellow arrow) and wiring connection (red arrow) that you need to disconnect from the rear of the manifold.

Do not forget to reinstall this vacuum line (red arrow) when reinstalling the manifold.
Figure 23

Do not forget to reinstall this vacuum line (red arrow) when reinstalling the manifold.

There are eight individual gaskets, one for each intake runner on the manifold.
Figure 24

There are eight individual gaskets, one for each intake runner on the manifold.

Inspect the gaskets and replace as necessary (red arrow).
Figure 25

Inspect the gaskets and replace as necessary (red arrow). The gaskets should still have their ridges and be firm and pliable. If you are fixing a vacuum leak I would recommend replacing all of the gaskets. If one has gone bad the rest are not far behind failing as well. Installation is the reverse of removal.




Bookmark and Share
Comments and Suggestions:
Roach Comments: hi, what are the torque specs for reattaching the intake manifold ?
October 28, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I don’t have that info.

I would grab a repair manual. It will have the procedure, special tools and torque specs.


Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 

  Search our site:    

View Cart & CheckOut | Project List | Order Status |  Help    

 

[Home] [Customer Service] [Shopping Cart] [Project/Wish List]
  [Privacy Statement]  [Contact Us] [About Us] [Shipping] [Careers]

Copyright © Pelican Parts Inc. -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page

Page last updated: Mon 12/5/2016 02:52:37 AM