Porsche Parts Catalog Porsche Accessories Catalog Porsche Technical Articles Porsche Tech Forums
 
  Search our site:    
View Recent Cars  |   Cart  | Project List | Order Status | Help    
 >  >
Spark Plug and Ignition Coil Replacement
 
Bookmark and Share

Pelican Technical Article:

Spark Plug and Ignition Coil Replacement

Casey Gervig

Time:

2 hours2 hrs

Tab:

$290 to $610

Talent:

**

Tools:

Pocket flat blade screwdriver, 13mm socket, universal adapter for socket, spark plug socket, ratchet, 6mm hex socket, extension, E10 female Torx socket

Applicable Models:

Porsche 996 GT2 (2002-05)
Porsche 996 Turbo (2001-05)
Porsche 996 Turbo S (2005)

Parts Required:

Spark plugs, ignition coils, bolts

Hot Tip:

Clean the spark plug area before removing the spark plugs

Performance Gain:

Efficient spark output

Complementary Modification:

PTP turbo blanket for 996TT

Spark plugs and coils are responsible for igniting the compressed air fuel mixture in the cylinders. On turbocharged engines spark plug demands are considerably higher than on non-turbo variants, which is why the 996 Turbo and GT2 should have their spark plugs replaced every 15,000-20,000 miles. Without the proper spark you could have a misfire, which will cause the check engine light to come on. While performing the spark plug replacement it's a good idea to inspect the ignition coils for cracks, and replace them if they have any cracks. I'd say 98% of the coils I have seen in my career have had cracks. It takes a fair bit of work to get in to replace the coils after the car is put back together so careful inspection of them, while in there, is important. It is necessary to remove the rear bumper, and intercooler consoles to perform this job. Please see our articles on: Rear Bumper Removal, and Intercooler Console Removal for instructions.

Remove the 13mm heat shield nuts (green arrows), which hold the heat shield to the frame rail.
Figure 1

Remove the 13mm heat shield nuts (green arrows), which hold the heat shield to the frame rail. On the passenger side of the car there is a ground strap (yellow arrow). While in here I usually like to clean the ground contact points and make sure it is nice and tight.

Now pull the heat shield off of the car.
Figure 2

Now pull the heat shield off of the car. It is usually a little tight. I recommend pulling it off of the studs (green arrows). Then tilt it upward (red arrow), and pull forward (yellow arrow) and away from the frame rail.

Remove the two 10mm bolts (green arrows) that hold the second heat shield on to the valve cover.
Figure 3

Remove the two 10mm bolts (green arrows) that hold the second heat shield on to the valve cover. Then slide this cover down and out of the way. You may not be able to remove that heat shield from the car, and this is fine. Just slide it down and out of your way. These heat shields have little wire holders on them for the oxygen sensor harness (yellow arrow) and on the driver side for the vacuum hose that controls the wastegate. Make sure these are in place and if not replace them. I believe they are available separately from the heat shield.

Slide the rubber dust boots up off of the electrical connector.
Figure 4

Slide the rubber dust boots up off of the electrical connector. Then release the electrical connector from the coil by pressing the release lever (yellow arrows) and pulling the connector out of the coil (green arrows). 

Remove the bolts for the coils (green arrows) using your 5mm hex socket.
Figure 5

Remove the bolts for the coils (green arrows) using your 5mm hex socket. Then pull the coils out of the cylinder head. Here you can also see the clip for the oxygen sensor (yellow arrow) and the positioning of the heat shield in its "out of the way" position. It is smart to replace the valve lift control bracket, and O-ring for the valve lift solenoid (red arrow). See our article on Valve Lift Solenoid Replacement for instructions.

Once the coils are removed check this area for cracks all the way around the body of the coil.
Figure 6

Once the coils are removed check this area for cracks all the way around the body of the coil. Here you can see a crack in one of the coils we removed from our project 996 Turbo S.

Put on your eye protection or face shield.
Figure 7

Put on your eye protection or face shield. Clean the area around the spark plugs with compressed air and brake spray before removing the spark plugs. Remove the spark plugs (green arrows) using your extension(s) and spark plug socket. Installation is the reverse of removal. I recommend when installing the new plugs, to put the new plug in the socket, and with your extension-attached spin the spark plug to the left until you feel the threads click. Then start to thread the plug in. This will help you to set the threads up more closely before beginning to tighten, and may prevent you from cross threading your spark plug threads.

Porsche has recently updated the coil design.
Figure 8

Porsche has recently updated the coil design. For the most part it is a direct replacement. You get longer bolts with the new coils because the shape of the new style body requires use of longer bolts. Here is a picture of the new style coil (green arrow) next to the old style coil (yellow arrow).

There was only one snag in our coil update.
Figure 9

There was only one snag in our coil update. Cylinder 4, the passenger side furthest toward the rear of the car, required a slight modification. The Torx head of the bolt rubbed on the heat shield when I bolted the heat shield back on. So I used a standard hex bolt (green arrow) that does not stick out as far as the Torx bolt. They are otherwise of the same length as the Torx bolt. With the added clearance of the bolt head and the installed spacer it did not rub. In this photo it shows two 6mm flat washers stacked (yellow arrow), but I later found a fat 6mm washer, which was the same size as the two stacked washers. Either way works. I used a little bit of grease to let the washers stick to the valve cover to aid in assembly.

Bookmark and Share

  Search our site:    

View Cart & CheckOut | Project List | Order Status |  Help    

 

[Home] [Customer Service] [Shopping Cart] [Project/Wish List]
  [Privacy Statement]  [Contact Us] [About Us] [Shipping] [Careers]

Copyright © Pelican Parts Inc. -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page

Page last updated: Mon 12/5/2016 03:06:33 AM