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Throttle Body Cleaning and Replacement
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

Throttle Body Cleaning and Replacement

Casey Gervig

Time:

1.5 hours

Tab:

$10 to $1,320

Talent:

**

Tools:

Small flat blade screwdriver, 10mm socket, 7mm deep socket, ratchet, spring band hose clamp pliers, or adjustable jaw pliers, 90-degree pick tool, lint free paper wipes, flashlight

Applicable Models:

Porsche 996 GT2 (2002-05)
Porsche 996 Turbo (2001-05)
Porsche 996 Turbo S (2005)

Parts Required:

Throttle body gasket, throttle body, Wurth multi-purpose solvent

Hot Tip:

Allow the DME to perform the throttle set-point adaptation after cleaning or replacing the throttle body.

Performance Gain:

Smoother transitions between on and off throttle

Complementary Modification:

Silicone boost hose upgrade

The throttle body is responsible for metering the amount of air that the engine takes in. The throttle body in your car is composed of a mechanical throttle valve, an electrical stepper motor and two potentiometers. It is a good idea to clean your throttle body at least every 30,000 miles or so. This article will also cover the replacement of the throttle body should yours require replacement due to electrical faults. I have seen a handful of dirty throttle bodies throw engine code P0102, or P0103, as well as PSM (Porsche Stability Management) faults for "Load Signal" due to gunky buildup on the throttle valve itself. This job requires you to remove the air filter housing. For instructions on how to do that please see our 996 Turbo article on Engine Air Filter Replacement.

Once the air filter is removed, remove the retaining clips for the two boost hoses (red arrows), which mount to the boost manifold (green arrow).
Figure 1

Once the air filter is removed, remove the retaining clips for the two boost hoses (red arrows), which mount to the boost manifold (green arrow). Then pull the two boost hoses out of the manifold, and let them hang below.

It's a good idea to cover any openings while you are working.
Figure 2

It's a good idea to cover any openings while you are working. Using spring band hose clamp pliers or adjustable jaw pliers move this hose clamp (green arrow) back off of the fat part of the hose (move to blue arrow). Make sure that the hose is not stuck on the boost manifold. This will need to be loose when you remove the boost manifold.

Next, use your small flat blade screwdriver to release the electrical connector on the boost pressure sensor.
Figure 3

Next, use your small flat blade screwdriver to release the electrical connector on the boost pressure sensor. Slide the screwdriver gently under the plastic retaining clip (green arrow). Lift it up, and push the connector back and out of the sensor. Then using adjustable jaw pliers or spring band hose clamp pliers move the hose clamp (red arrow) on the breather hose up to where the breather hose starts to bend. Then pull the breather hose off of the nipple on the boost manifold.

Using a 7mm deep socket on a 1/4-inch drive ratchet loosen the hose clamps (green arrow) that hold the rubber boot on the throttle body and boost manifold.
Figure 4

Using a 7mm deep socket on a 1/4-inch drive ratchet loosen the hose clamps (green arrow) that hold the rubber boot on the throttle body and boost manifold.   

There are three 10mm bolts (green arrows) holding the boost manifold in place.
Figure 5

There are three 10mm bolts (green arrows) holding the boost manifold in place. The one in the center of the "Y" is slightly longer than the other two. Remove these and the vacuum hose (red arrow) from the electronic vacuum valve. The end on the boost manifold usually has a hose clamp, so if you don't want to cut that off, slip the hose off of the electronic vacuum valve end (blue arrow). Pull the boost manifold toward the rear of the car and out of the engine compartment.

Disconnect the electrical connector from the throttle body by squeezing the tabs
Figure 6

Disconnect the electrical connector from the throttle body by squeezing the tabs on the top and bottom of the connector (green arrows), and pull it off of the throttle body

Remove the rubber boot (green arrow) from the throttle body.
Figure 7

Remove the rubber boot (green arrow) from the throttle body.

Remove the four 10mm bolts (green arrows) holding the throttle body to the intake plenum, and pull the throttle body out of the engine compartment.
Figure 8

Remove the four 10mm bolts (green arrows) holding the throttle body to the intake plenum, and pull the throttle body out of the engine compartment.

Using a pick tool or a screwdriver pull the old gasket out of the plenum.
Figure 9

Using a pick tool or a screwdriver pull the old gasket out of the plenum. Always replace the throttle body gasket if the throttle body is removed. Now if you're replacing the throttle body, installation is the reverse of removal. After replacing you'll need to perform the throttle set-point adaptation. Put the car back together. Then let the car sit with the key in the on position, and engine off for a minute or so. You will hear the throttle body make a click clack noise. Set-point adaptation is complete. The throttle body cleaning process is below.

This picture shows some of the grime, which we will be removing (green arrows).
Figure 10

This picture shows some of the grime, which we will be removing (green arrows). 

Using a lint free wipe like Kimwipes, or a paper coffee filter, spray a generous amount of Wurth Multi-Purpose Solvent (or similar) on the wipe and start wiping the grime out of the throttle body.
Figure 11

Using a lint free wipe like Kimwipes, or a paper coffee filter, spray a generous amount of Wurth Multi-Purpose Solvent (or similar) on the wipe and start wiping the grime out of the throttle body. Make sure to get all of the grime out, open the throttle valve (do this carefully and don't allow it to slam shut there are plastic gears inside which could be damaged) and remove all the little spots of sticky grime. I went through a few wipes. When they start to fall apart throw them away and start with a new one.

This picture shows a persistent grime spot (green arrow).
Figure 12

This picture shows a persistent grime spot (green arrow). Make sure to get ALL the grime out. Keep wiping. Never use anything abrasive (i.e. sandpaper or Scotch Brite pads) to clean the throttle body. More solvent and a fresh wipe will work. These little spots by where the throttle valve closes are critical. Installation is the reverse of removal. To perform the throttle set-point adaptation, put the car back together, and then let the car sit with the key in the on position, and engine off for a minute or so. You will hear the throttle body make a "click-clack" noise. The throttle set-point adaptation is complete.

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