Parts Catalog Accessories Catalog Tech Info Tech Forums
 
  Search our site:    
View Recent Cars  |   Cart  | Project List | Order Status | Help    
 >  >
Porsche 911 Carrera Starter Replacement
 
Bookmark and Share

Pelican Technical Article:

Porsche 911 Carrera Starter Replacement

Time:

3 hours3 hrs

Tab:

$300

Talent:

*****

Tools:

Socket set with extensions, screwdrivers

Applicable Models:

 
Porsche 996 Carrera models (1999-05)
Porsche 996 Turbo, GT2, GT3 (2001-05)
Porsche 997 Carrera models (2005-08)
Porsche 997 Turbo, GT2, GT3 (2007-08)

Parts Required:

New starter

Hot Tip:

Use a combination of extensions and U-joints

Performance Gain:

Car starts right up every time

Complementary Modification:

Replace vacuum lines in engine bay

Starter motors fail over time: it's just a fact of life. It may be that a starter motor is working fine one day and then all of a sudden dies the next day. Or, sometimes the motor gets weaker and weaker and turns the car over slower and slower. This is a possible sign that you should replace your starter motor. However, before replacing your starter, check the condition of your battery and make sure your ground strap is properly installed (Pelican Technical Article: Porsche 911 Carrera Battery Replacement Trickle Charger Installation). Also check the clutch pedal switch (see Pelican Technical Article: Brake Clutch and Cruise Control Switch Replacement - Porsche 911 Carrera) and the proper operation of the electronic immobilizer system. Try a different ignition key: the key has a built in RFID chip that may have somehow become damaged. If possible, have the system checked using the Porsche factory scan tools (PST-2 or PIWIS).

Once you are certain that the starter is the problem, begin by first disconnecting the battery. You'll be working around the starter and there is always a 12V load going to the starter. If you accidentally touch it, you can injure yourself or cause a variety of problems with the car's electrical system. Be safe, take the extra time to disconnect it. Another good tip here is to get a bunch of Ziploc bags to hold all of the various nuts and bolts you will be removing from the engine. Open the engine lid and begin by removing the airbox. Loosen and remove the 13mm bolt at the very back of the airbox (996 only) and the hose clamp holding the boot to the throttle body. You'll also have to unplug the connector to the MAF by squeezing the connector. Now pull the boot off the throttle body and remove the airbox from the engine bay. If you have a 3.8L make sure you disconnect the wire for the resonance valve.

Now remove the throttle body. The throttle body is held in place on the intake plenum by four 10mm bolts and a 10mm nut attached to an eccentric bracket at the bottom. Remove all four bolts, taking care not to drop the bolts into the engine bay. You'll now need to disconnect either the throttle cable (on early cars) or the electrical connector for the throttle (on later cars). The throttle cable ferrule runs along a plastic cam on the side of the throttle body. If you manually open the throttle, the cable tension will go slack, allowing you to unhook the ferrule from the shoulder in the plastic cam. On cars with electronic throttle bodies, simply unhook the electrical connector.

On the early cars, rotate the throttle body over to access the hose connection on the backside. Use a pair of pliers to loosen and remove the hose clamp holding the hose onto the throttle body. Don't forget to pull the O-ring out of the intake plenum that seals the throttle body. Now set the throttle body aside in a safe place.

Once the throttle body is removed, you'll need to remove the front intake plenum. Begin by removing the air hose connection to the oil separator. Squeeze the black plastic connector to disconnect the hose from the plenum. Once free, set the hose connection aside. Now loosen the hose clamps securing the plenum to each manifold. A good idea here is to loosen the inner hose clamps first and then rotate the plenum to help break the seal that may have formed between the rubber, then tighten the inner and loosen the outer clamps and do the same to break the connection between the rubber seals and the intake manifolds. Sometimes they can stick together making removal a bit difficult and this will help free them up. As you will note there is not much room to work and anything that makes it easier will help. Slide the rubber seals onto the plenum and wiggle the plenum out.

Once the plenum is removed, you should be able to see the starter directly under the rear intake plenum. One of the electrical connections will have a rubber boot over it. Behind the boot is the 13mm nut that holds the 12v lead going from the battery to the starter. You'll need to remove this nut and pull the 12v line off. Now, before you touch this nut, double check that you have disconnected the battery. If you didn't, you'll probably get a huge shock the second you touch the nut with a wrench. Be safe, double check. Now remove the nut and also the 10mm nut directly to the right. This is the electrical connection that triggers the solenoid on the starter motor.

Once both electrical connections are removed, you'll need to remove the two 15mm bolts the hold the starter to the engine. Like with the electrical connections, you'll need to use a combination of extensions and u-joints to reach the bolts. The bolt on the right of the starter is pretty easily removed. However, the one on the left isn't even visible. This one will give you the most grief. You'll have to find just the right combination of u joints and extensions to get them off, just have patience and you should be ok.

Once the bolts are removed, carefully remove the starter from under the plenum and up and out of the engine bay.

Open the engine decklid and remove the airbox.
Figure 1

Open the engine decklid and remove the airbox. Begin by loosening the hose clamp holding the boot to the throttle body (green arrow), then squeeze the tabs on the MAF connector to release it (yellow arrow). Now open the two harness holder clips (purple arrows). Finally, unbolt the 13mm bolt (996 only) holding the airbox inside the engine compartment (red arrow) and carefully lift the airbox out of the car. If you have a 3.8L make sure you disconnect the wire for the resonance valve.

Remove the four 10mm bolts (green arrows) and also the 10mm nut (purple arrow) holding the throttle body to the engine.
Figure 2

Remove the four 10mm bolts (green arrows) and also the 10mm nut (purple arrow) holding the throttle body to the engine. At the same time, also remove the electrical connector going to the throttle position sensor (yellow arrow).

If you have an early car with a throttle cable, rotate the throttle back enough to relieve tension on the throttle cable and slip it out of the plastic cable cam as shown here.
Figure 3

If you have an early car with a throttle cable, rotate the throttle back enough to relieve tension on the throttle cable and slip it out of the plastic cable cam as shown here.

Also on the earlier cars you will need to rotate the throttle body over to access the hose connection on the backside.
Figure 4

Also on the earlier cars you will need to rotate the throttle body over to access the hose connection on the backside. Use a pair of pliers to loosen and remove the hose clamp holding the hose onto the throttle body. Don't forget to pull the O-ring out of the intake plenum that seals the throttle body to it.

Follow the hose connection coming off the throttle body back to the control solenoid and press the wire piece in to release the electrical connector.
Figure 5

Follow the hose connection coming off the throttle body back to the control solenoid and press the wire piece in to release the electrical connector. Now place the hose/solenoid assembly off to the side.

Once the throttle body is removed, you'll need to remove the first intake plenum.
Figure 6

Once the throttle body is removed, you'll need to remove the first intake plenum. Begin by removing the air hose connection to the oil separator. Squeeze the black plastic connector (purple arrow) to disconnect the hose from the plenum. Once free, set the hose connection aside. Now loosen the hose clamps securing the plenum to each manifold (green arrows). A good idea here is to loosen the inner hose clamps first and then rotate the plenum to help break the seal that may have formed between the rubber, then tighten the inner and loosen the outer clamps and do the same to break the connection between the rubber seals and the intake manifolds.

Once the hose clamps are loose, you should be able to push the intake plenum over to one side and pull it free of the manifold as shown here.
Figure 7

Once the hose clamps are loose, you should be able to push the intake plenum over to one side and pull it free of the manifold as shown here.

Shown here are the two electrical connections you'll need to remove from the starter.
Figure 8

Shown here are the two electrical connections you'll need to remove from the starter. The green arrow points to the main power connection coming directly from the battery of the car to the 13mm nut on the starter motor. The purple arrow points to the 10mm nut securing the electrical connection to the solenoid.

You'll need to use a combination of extensions and u-joints to remove the nuts holding the electrical connections to the starter as shown here.
Figure 9

You'll need to use a combination of extensions and u-joints to remove the nuts holding the electrical connections to the starter as shown here.

As with the electrical connections, you'll need to find the right combination of u-joints and extensions to reach the two 15mm bolts on either side of the starter motor (green arrows).
Figure 10

As with the electrical connections, you'll need to find the right combination of u-joints and extensions to reach the two 15mm bolts on either side of the starter motor (green arrows). In thisPicture you can see the right side bolt being removed.

Once both bolts are removed, carefully remove the starter from under the intake plenum and out from the engine.
Figure 11

Once both bolts are removed, carefully remove the starter from under the intake plenum and out from the engine.

Shown here is a shot of the engine with the starter removed.
Figure 12

Shown here is a shot of the engine with the starter removed. At this point, installation is the opposite of removal.

Bookmark and Share
Comments and Suggestions:
Jim Comments: I have 1999 996 C2 Cab. Symptom was a slow turnover when starting. Bought Re-manufactured Bosch Starter which looked very well done when I got it. This job is a bit fiddly and skinned knuckles are likely but very doable in an afternoon. The guide above was really help full but here are another couple of comments. On the bottom of each of the two rubber connectors between the front plenum and manifolds Figure 6 there are very thin tubes that should be pulled out before starting to move things around otherwise it looks like they might break. The next tip is that the left hand bolt on the starter can be reached quite easily with a selection of straight extensions. I used a 12 and two 3 inch. You can't use one big one as it is tight to get in. the trick is to put in in the space under and to the right of the alternator pulley and reach right back to the starter bolt. Its a straight shot. Good luck
September 24, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for sharing your installation process and experience. These type of comments add so much to the Pelican tech community.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Cigarman Comments: 99 Carrera. While removing the intake plenum during starter repair I discovered two small tubes which were inserted into and behind the rubber connectors and since I wasn't expecting them they pulled away from whatever they were connected to when I tugged the plenum out. I need to know what they reconnect to or are they even needed.
September 15, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: One should run toa vacuum line at the center of the engine, the other to the under the intake plenum near the a/c compressor. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Mike Comments: You say that both of the knock sensors are relatively difficult to get too. Could you write and photograph the procedure to replacing these knock sensors on a 1999 C2 996. Thanks in advance. I bought a #2 knock sensor from Pelican Parts along with $400 worth of other materials and need to replace same but have no way of knowing how to achieve this work.
September 8, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: We don't currently have that tech article. If we get a chance to perform the procedure, we will be sure to document it.

I would grab a Bentley repair manual in the meantime. It will have the procedure, special tools and torque specs.

Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
996 Comments: hi, i have a 996 2001 with a crack in the engine lining is there anyway of fixing this without a rebuild?
January 31, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Not that I know of. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
mhariush Comments: I tried to change my starter today, but when I tried to loosen the 13mm nut on the solenoid for the power, the stud itself came loose! The stud is now turning freely along with the nut... And it's not coming out.
October 14, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: You'll need to break the stud out of the starter. Then remove the stud and nut using vise grips once the starter is removed. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Craig Comments: I replaced my starter, 2004 996, and now the car has a lugging idle. There was only one vacuum line and I did get it back. Could this be from disconnecting the battery? My thought is that the ECU is learning. Doesn't make sense but not sure what else it could be.
September 25, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: No learning needed. the vehicle has a memory. I would check for fault codes, also check for any items you may have left detached. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
DK570 Comments: Any tips to get the starter out? I removed the two bolts, and undid the electrical connections, but I cant get the starter out. I can't even get it to budge. I've tried tapping it with a rod & mallet, and tried spinning the engine a bit.
July 17, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Make sure your starter does not have any other brackets attached to it. I seem to remember on some of the cars that there was a supplemental bracket attached to the end of the starter motor. Once you have made sure the starter is free try to wiggle it up and down, left and right and that usually does the trick. - Casey at Pelican Parts  
frank Comments: everything went perfect until i moved the little water pipe to get more movement on the airhose oil separatar and it snapped bet its dealer only oh well off to porsche.frankie 996
April 27, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799 and they can help figure out which part or repair kit you need.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 

  Search our site:    

View Cart & CheckOut | Project List | Order Status |  Help    

 

[Home] [Customer Service] [Shopping Cart] [Project/Wish List]
  [Privacy Statement]  [Contact Us] [About Us] [Shipping] [Careers]

Copyright © Pelican Parts Inc. -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page

Page last updated: Fri 12/2/2016 02:31:50 AM