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Replacing Clutch Hydraulics on the Porsche 911 Carrera
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

Replacing Clutch Hydraulics on the Porsche 911 Carrera

Time:

2 hours2 hrs

Tab:

$150

Talent:

**

Tools:

Socket set

Applicable Models:

Porsche 996 Carrera models (1999-05)
Porsche 996 Turbo, GT2, GT3 (2001-05)
Porsche 997 Carrera models (2005-12)
Porsche 997 Turbo, GT2, GT3 (2007-13)

Parts Required:

Clutch slave cylinder

Hot Tip:

Replace when performing a clutch job

Performance Gain:

Reliable shifting and clutch operation

Complementary Modification:

Bleed brake system

PLEASE NOTE: This article is not applicable to Turbos. 

The Carreras have a hydraulic clutch engagement system, there are no cables involved with the actuation of the clutch. Although this actually creates a more reliable clutch system over time, there can be a failure or breakdown of the system if the slave or master cylinder get old and begin to leak or fail. A spongy feel to the clutch pedal, grinding of gears when shifting, long pedal travel, and hydraulic leaks under the car are all signs that one or more components of the system have failed. The first place I like to start is the clutch slave cylinder, as it is easy and inexpensive to replace.

Replacement of the slave cylinder is also pretty easy. Its location is easy to get to from underneath the car. Start by jacking up the car (Pelican Technical Article: Jacking Up Your Porsche 911 Carrera). The slave cylinder is located on the left side of the transmission, two bolts fasten it to the transmission. Begin by disconnecting the hydraulic line from the cylinder. Make sure you use a flare-nut wrench to remove the hose. These hydraulic fittings have a tendency to strip if you use a regular wrench. Also, inspect the clutch slave line -- you might want to replace it if it's bulging or shows signs of cracking in the rubber. Before you disconnect the line, make sure that you have a drip pan to catch the fluid that will leak out.

Now, remove the two bolts that hold the cylinder to the transmission. The slave cylinder should remove easily. Install the new one and reattach the clutch fluid line. Place a little bit of white lithium grease on the tip of the slave cylinder prior to installation.

Replacement of the clutch master cylinder is fairly straightforward. Begin by removing the plastic cover to the left of the battery in the front trunk. Using a turkey baster, remove enough brake fluid to lower the level in the reservoir below the fill hole for the clutch master cylinder. Then disconnect both the supply line and the slave cylinder line (see Figure 1). Next, from underneath the dash disconnect the master cylinder from the pedal and unbolt it from the car (Figure 2). Have a whole bunch of paper towels handy to wipe up any spilled brake fluid -- the stuff is very hazardous to your car's paint.

The system now needs to be bled. I like to use the Motive Products Power Bleeder (available from PelicanParts.com) for this task. For more information on using the Power Bleeder, see Project 48 on Bleeding Brakes. Fill up the fluid reservoir to the MAX level, and attach the power bleeder to the top of the master cylinder reservoir. Press in the clutch pedal. Pump up the pressure in the bleeder to about 22 psi. Move to underneath the car and attach your bleeder hose to the bleed nipple on the slave cylinder. Open the bleeder valve by turning it counterclockwise and let the system bleed out until no more bubbles appear.

When finished, remove the bleeder system, lower the car, and try the clutch again. The pedal should have a good feel to it, and the clutch should engage normally. If you are still having problems, you should try replacing your clutch master cylinder next.

In the front trunk, under the plastic cover you will find the clutch master cylinder.
Figure 1

In the front trunk, under the plastic cover you will find the clutch master cylinder. Empty the fluid reservoir below the clutch fill hole, and then disconnect both the filler hose (red arrow) and the hydraulic line that leads to the slave cylinder (pry out the locking clipâÂÂÂÂ"yellow arrow).

From underneath the dash, remove the clevis pin (yellow arrow) and circlip that attaches the clutch master cylinder to the clutch pedal.
Figure 2

From underneath the dash, remove the clevis pin (yellow arrow) and circlip that attaches the clutch master cylinder to the clutch pedal. Unbolt the two attachment bolts (green arrows) and slide the master cylinder out. The inset photo shows a brand new clutch master cylinder.

Shown here are the various components associated with the slave cylinder.
Figure 3

Shown here are the various components associated with the slave cylinder. The yellow arrow points to the slave cylinder and the green arrow is pointing to the bolts that attach the slave cylinder to the transmission. The blue arrow shows the slave cylinder hydraulic line.

To disconnect the fluid line, use a flare-nut wrench to disconnect the line shown by the yellow arrow.
Figure 4

To disconnect the fluid line, use a flare-nut wrench to disconnect the line shown by the yellow arrow. The green arrow points to the bleed nipple (with the rubber cover removed), which is required for bleeding air out of the clutch system. The lower inset photo shows bleeding the slave cylinder

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Comments and Suggestions:
ferdzz Comments: Back in March this year replaced the clutch master cylinder and also replaced the slave, but keep getting air in line see post March 6. Worked fine for a few months, but now the problem of air in the line is coming up again, with the same symptoms. Hard accel on freeway, go through 1-4 fine but 5-6 are hard to shift to. Then after freeway driving at high speed back to stop and go traffic. Clutch has air and difficult to go shift 1-6. No leaks that can be seen on floor and no decrease volume of DOT4.
May 23, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: if air is getting in, check the lines and connections for leaks or an area of intrusion. If sealed, you have a defective part. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
hansi Comments: have a 2004 996 turbo clutch pedal goes down very hard unless engine is running any idea what is causing it ?
April 6, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I apologize, read that as brake, not clutch.

This could be an issue with the pressure accumulator for the clutch.

Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can figure out what part or repair kit you need.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Blaze-n-James Comments: Just installed a Sacs Stage 1 clutch and a used gearbox with 44,000 miles on it in my 1999 996. Both the clutch and gearbox seem to work perfectly for one exception after about driving for 1000 miles or so I have experienced the point of engagement with regards to clutch pedal travelling towards the high end and have noticed that I have had to adjust my driving style so as to not burn out clutch! Just the other day while leaving a light and having to avoid a stalled car my clutch responded poorly and the pedal wouldn't fully return to it original position for a brief moment. I let it do its thing and stayed of it! It felt like a hydraulic system issue! Upon reached distination a few highway miles later could smell the clutch. Clutch seems fine for the exception of having to be much more prudent while deliberate in the way the clutch is being used? Any additional suggestions! RID€ON! blazenjamesproductions@gmail
March 10, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Usually hydraulic problems would cause a very low pedal, due to lack or flow or pressure. Sounds like you have a wear issue. Was the flywheel checked or replaced? - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Ferdzz Comments: I replaced the clutch slave cylinder a few months ago and everything was fine. Just last week my clutch started to have a very low friction point off the floor. I bled using Motive Power bleeder the system since then with lots of air in the line-bled out about 1 qt. of DOT4. Returned to service with good feel driving around town. but once I get on freeway, with hard accel. going through 1-6 gears, clutch starts to get low friction point again.
Bled system again, with even more DOT4 bleed out, yesterday, same problem.
Seems there is air getting into system, but from where???
March 6, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: The master cylinder or the line may be leaking. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Rodmunch Comments: Hi Nick , help please. Just fitted a new slave cylinder to 997 and went to bleed it and the clutch pedal is stuck to the floor and won't return ?
Any ideas please? Thank you
January 16, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Pull the pedal up by hand. Then pressure or gravity bleed the system first. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Ron Comments: Nick I tried both pivots , the old one and the new on . The new one was slightly longer. I used the new one and it seems it disengaged the clutch until I took the car off the jacks . After taken off the jacks it stopped disengaging . I tried bleeding the system but it made the pedal worse. Please help any suggestions appreciated thanks
January 13, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: You need the pivot of the same length.

Are you sure the hydraulic system is bled? - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Ron Comments: I bought a spec clutch. Kit and a ammsco lite wt fly wheel from pelican. After changing the ims bearing I installed the clutch . I changed the new clutch parts in a kit at pelicn also. I put it all together and the clutch will not disengage with the engine on . Ive taken the thing apart 3 times and still will not disengage when up on the jack stands but off the stands would not. I changed th slave valve and found the s haft was not in the lever. Still will not disengage .what am I doing wrong or did I buy the wrong clutch. Im thinking about changing th master cylinder . If this does not work I will put the oringinal clutch.
January 12, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Start by confirming the slave cylinder is being actuated by the master. It's possible there is an issue in the hydraulic system. The trouble is it is hard to see this due to the slave being concealed in the trans bell housing. Did you replace the clutch fork pivot? I believe there are two sizes, possible you have the wrong one. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Hurdigurdiman Comments: Your reply and solution is a pretty obvious one but mine does not unscrew. The top does unscrew in order to fill up the reservoir with fluid, but the net part, is fully attached to the reservoir. Appears to be part of the inner body. I will have another try and then let you know the outcomne. .
November 26, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: You will have to lever out / pull the screen up and out. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Hurdigurdiman Comments: How do you remove the net on top off the reservoir to get the turkey baster into it for lowering the fluid level?
November 21, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Unscrew the lid, then remove the filter / screen. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Randall Comments: So if I have a 996tt I do not need to purchase the gt2 conversion kit? I Just need need a new slave and master cylinder?
October 24, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I am not 100% sure of the part cross-over / application. Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can figure out what part or repair kit you need.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Brooks Comments: Does this apply for the 996 Turbo? I didnt see the accumulator in the pictures
November 20, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I would say not, the accumulator and slave are together, so it is much tighter working space and more to the slave. - Nick at Pelican Parts  

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