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Transmission Removal - Porsche 911 Carrera
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

Transmission Removal - Porsche 911 Carrera

Time:

8 hours8 hrs

Tab:

$0

Talent:

*****

Tools:

All of them,

Applicable Models:

Porsche 996 Carrera (1999-05)
Porsche 997 Carrera (2005-12)

Parts Required:

Transmission

Hot Tip:

Have a buddy help you when you're ready to drop the unit

Performance Gain:

Ability to access engine

Complementary Modification:

Clutch replacement, replace transmission mounts

Some jobs on the 996 require removal of the transmission, such as replacing the IMS bearing or the clutch. To the beginner, this may seem a bit daunting, but it really isn't that difficult. The key is to make sure you are well organized, have a good set of tools and set aside plenty of time to do the job.

The first step is to disconnect the negative lead from the battery. Please refer to our article on changing the battery for more info. You'll be working around electrical connections while you're under the car. It just makes sense to be safe and prevent any possible damage to both you and the car. Secondly, jack the car up and support all four corners on jackstands. You'll want to have the car as high up in the air as possible here to help with clearance. A quick note here on jack stands: it makes sense to invest in a good quality set. Here at Pelican, we use Esco jackstands. These are about the best you can get, with an individual 6000 pound capacity.

Now remove the rear tires, and crawl under the car. The first step is to remove the plastic underbody trays. These are held in place by three Phillips screws and a series of plastic 10mm nuts. Set the trays aside and locate the two 15mm bolts holding the aluminum crossmember piece between the suspension uprights. You might want to drain all the fluid from the transmission at this point. It isn't required that you drain the fluid to drop the transmission, although it is a good idea if the fluid has not been changed in a long time.

Now begin to remove the six 8mm hex bolts holding each CV joint to the transmission. You'll find that it's kind of difficult to access all of them. The best success comes from finding a spot under the car where you can reach the bolt, then lock the car in gear and put the e-brake on. Once the bolt is lose, put the car in neutral, release the e-brake and rotate the axle until you can reach the other bolts. Once all of the bolts have been removed, the CV joint should just pop off the side of the transmission. Set them off to the side and crawl over to the left (driver's) side of the car.

Just behind the bellhousing of the transmission, you'll find the slave cylinder for the clutch. This will need to be disconnected in order to remove the transmission. There are basically two ways to do it. You can either leave the slave cylinder bolted to the transmission and disconnect the hydraulic feed line, or you can unbolt the slave cylinder from the transmission and leave the hose connected. It's easier to unbolt the slave from the transmission. If you unbolt the slave, you won't have to bleed the circuit of air later on. Unfortunately, it's a bit difficult to access. There are two 13mm bolts that hold the cylinder on that isn't visible with the transmission in place. You'll find that the bolts are a bit easier to reach with a socket and 4" extension once the left CV axle has been disconnected. Once both bolts are removed, carefully pull the slave cylinder out of the mounting boss on the transmission and set it aside.

Move over to the right (passenger) side of the transmission and locate the two shift cables connected to the transmission. Both will need to be removed. The ends of the cables simply pop off the ball joints on the shift levers, you can use a large standard screwdriver to pop these off. You'll also see a metal clip holding each shift cable to its mounting bracket. Pry the clips off and slide the cables out of the brackets. At this point, also disconnect the electrical connection going to the reverse lamp switch right behind the cables.

Now you'll want to remove the bolts that hold the transmission. You won't have to worry about the transmission falling off the engine at this point because the input shaft of the transmission as well as the rear mount will hold it in place. This is probably the most difficult part of the job because of the odd angles you will have to contort yourself into to reach the bolts. All of the bolts are 16mm except for the lower two. On the right side of the engine, there is a 13mm nut and bolt. On the left side of the engine there is an odd triple square bolt at the bottom of the case. You'll need the correct tool to remove this bolt. Don't try to do it with an Allen wrench or a Torx. You'll just end up stripping out the inside of the bolt and making things even harder for yourself.

One of the tools you'll want to consider getting for this job is a transmission jack. These specialized, scissors-style jacks are invaluable for this type of work. You can usually find one for under $100 and most come with a cradle already formed to fit on the underside of most transmissions. They also usually come with a strap to prevent the tranny from falling off the jack. Place the jack directly under the transmission and jack it up until you just take up the weight of the transmission. At the same time, you'll want to support the rear of the engine with a floor jack. Like the transmission, just take up the weight of the engine.

At the front (towards the front of the car) of the transmission, there are two brackets that make up the mounting system. Both of them overlap right at the rubber transmission mount and are held together with two long 16mm nuts and bolts. The brackets themselves are held to the car with 16mm nuts. Now, before you remove anything MAKE SURE the transmission jack is securely holding the weight of the tranny. Once you are sure that the transmission is secure, remove the two 16mm nuts and bolts on the rubber centered mount, then remove all the 16mm nuts. Now remove the lower mount bracket and begin to lower the transmission jack. As the transmission lowers, you'll be able to remove the upper piece.

Once you remove the upper piece of the transmission mount, you'll want to jack the transmission back up level with the engine. Now you'll have to separate the transmission from the engine. Typically, you should be able to just pull back on the transmission which will then slowly begin to come off the input shaft of the engine, revealing the clutch. Take your time, and make sure that the transmission isn't hanging up on the input shaft. The key here is to keep the planes of both the engine and transmission level. Once the input shaft slides out of the clutch, you'll be able to lower the transmission down and out from under the car.

It's a good idea to firmly support the engine at this point. You'll have a bit of wiggle room to work with the jackstands to get the engine secured. Don't rely on a floor jack to hold the engine for extended periods of time. ALWAYS use jack stands. At this point, you'll be able to access the clutch, the IMS bearing and real main seal (once the flywheel is removed). You can replace the rear transmission mount if needed.

Re-installing the transmission is essentially the reverse of removal, although there are a couple of little tricks you need to know to make it a bit easier. The most difficult part of re-installing is getting the input shaft to slide into the clutch disc. What you want to do is to first LIGHTLY grease the splines of the input shaft. This will help the splines slide into the clutch disc. Don't overdo it here. You don't want to get any grease on the clutch lining. As the clutch spins, the grease can get thrown out onto the lining, which can cause the clutch to slip.

You'll want to line the transmission up to the engine as close as possible, making sure that all of the mounting holes are in the same plane. Also, it helps to rotate the engine's crankshaft slightly, to allow the input shaft splines to mate up with the clutch disc. It's likely going to take some time to get the angles just right enough to where you can get a couple of bolts through the mounting holes for both the engine and transmission. Eventually, you'll get it just right and the transmission will just slide right on.

Shown here is the 996 transmission removed from the car.
Figure 1

Shown here is the 996 transmission removed from the car. Some jobs on the 996 require the transmission to be removed, such as a bad IMS bearing or bad clutch. In any case, removing the tranny isn't that difficult. In this article, we will go over all the steps involved.

Begin the engine drop by removing the two Phillips head screws and 10mm plastic nuts that hold the plastic undertray in place underneath the front of the transmission.
Figure 2

Begin the engine drop by removing the two Phillips head screws and 10mm plastic nuts that hold the plastic undertray in place underneath the front of the transmission.

Remove the two 15mm bolts (green arrow) holding the aluminum crossmember piece between the suspension uprights and remove the crossmember.
Figure 3

Remove the two 15mm bolts (green arrow) holding the aluminum crossmember piece between the suspension uprights and remove the crossmember.

Remove each of the six 8mm hex bolts holding each CV joint to the transmission.
Figure 4

Remove each of the six 8mm hex bolts holding each CV joint to the transmission. Make sure that the tool is firmly seated inside the bolt, or you risk stripping out the inside.

Shown here are the two 13mm bolts (green arrows) that hold the clutch slave cylinder to the transmission.
Figure 5

Shown here are the two 13mm bolts (green arrows) that hold the clutch slave cylinder to the transmission. This view shows the whole assembly with the transmission removed from the car. When installed, you really won't be able to see the bolts. You'll have to feel around for them using a 13mm socket and extension.

Remove the ball ends of the shift cables from the transmission by popping them off with a large screwdriver (green arrows).
Figure 6

Remove the ball ends of the shift cables from the transmission by popping them off with a large screwdriver (green arrows). Then remove the shift cable retaining clips by prying them off (purple arrows). Note that on our car, one of the clips was missing and someone had used a zip tie to hold the cable in the retainer bracket.

Remove the electrical connection going to the reverse light switch on the transmission towards the front of the car (green arrow).
Figure 7

Remove the electrical connection going to the reverse light switch on the transmission towards the front of the car (green arrow).

You'll now want to remove all of the bolts that hold the transmission to the engine.
Figure 8

You'll now want to remove all of the bolts that hold the transmission to the engine. All of these bolts are 16mm except for the bottom two. The one on the left (driver's) side is a 13mm thru bolt with a 13mm nut.

On the right (passenger) side of the transmission is a female 10mm tri-square bolt.
Figure 9

On the right (passenger) side of the transmission is a female 10mm tri-square bolt. Don't try to remove this bolt without the proper tool. You'll just end up stripping out the inside and giving yourself even more headaches.

10: With the engine and transmission firmly supported, remove the four 16mm nuts that hold the front part of the transmission mounting bracket to the chassis (green arrows).
Figure 10

10: With the engine and transmission firmly supported, remove the four 16mm nuts that hold the front part of the transmission mounting bracket to the chassis (green arrows). Also remove the 16mm thru bolts and nuts that hold the bracket to the transmission mount (purple arrows). Remove the lower mounting bracket. Also remove the two 16mm nuts holding the upper mounting bracket to the chassis (yellow arrows).

Now remove the two 16mm nuts holding the upper mounting bracket to the chassis (green arrows).
Figure 11

Now remove the two 16mm nuts holding the upper mounting bracket to the chassis (green arrows). Once the transmission has been lowered, you will be able to slide the upper mounting plate over the transmission.

This photo shows the bottom of the transmission as we are pulling it away from the engine.
Figure 12

This photo shows the bottom of the transmission as we are pulling it away from the engine. The engine weight is supported by a jack stand. As you pull away the transmission from the engine, you will see a small gap begin to appear (green arrow). This indicates that you are proceeding correctly, and the transmission is beginning to come out.

Although you can do it yourself, I recommend having a transmission-drop buddy around to help you.
Figure 13

Although you can do it yourself, I recommend having a transmission-drop buddy around to help you. Using your jack, carefully line up the bottom of the jack with the bottom of the transmission as shown. If you position it just right, you will be able to balance the transmission perfectly on the jack. Don't put your arms, legs, or face underneath the transmission as you are pulling it out: once the input shaft slides out from the center of the clutch it will become really wobbly on your jack. Lower it to the floor carefully and pull it out from under the car.

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Comments and Suggestions:
Tcody Comments: I have a question I have a 2003 Porsche 911 carrera, it wwill let me drive it in auto, reverse, and neutral works fine as well does park but it seems like it's not shifting and it won't let me manually shift, at 40mph the engine is hitting 4k help what do I need to do to fix it?
November 2, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Could be an issue with the valve body or a solenoid. First check the transmission fluid level to be sure it is correct. Then check the transmission ECM for fault codes. If the system is not working properly, a fault code will be set. This will be your best bet when diagnosing.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
tdo Comments: Help!! I've got everything off in order to drop the transmission except for bolt #1 at the top of the transmission to engine. I can fit a 3/8's drive with 16mm socket but not enough torque to break. Any tricks for getting #1 bolt out? thanks
May 29, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Try a 1/2 to 3/8 reducer, and use a 1/2 breaker bar. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
diy guy Comments: Hi, I am following this after installing pelican super clutch kit, I have all screws back in trying to mate the transmission case to the engine, and at 1/2" gap without it "easily" going in. There is recommendation near the end of the article "it helps to rotate the engine's crankshaft slightly", how exactly does one rotate the crankshaft ?
March 7, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Place a socket on the crankshaft pulley center bolt and rotate the engine using s ratchet. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Vince Comments: Good info. Can you briefly outline the tiptronic transmission removal? Before I start this job, I'd like to understand all of the steps and I'm assuming they're somewhat different from the detailed instructions you provided on the manual.
February 11, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: The main difference would be removed the starter and accessing the torque converter bolts through the opening. Also the cooler lines and fastener locations. I would grab a repair manual. It will have the procedure, special tools and torque specs.

Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Zumo Comments: I guess the new question will be if the whole engine has to come out in order to remove the clutch. This is a 2008 gt2 turbo rear wheel drive. I found it very difficult to find the right info on this one.
December 14, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I would remove it as a unit. It makes life a lot easier. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
zumo Comments: I'm replacing a clutch on a 08 GT2. been trough this instructions on how to remove the transmission but this are for a 911 Carrera, very similar but with few differences. I have everything pretty much loose, after removing the two bolts from slave cylinder I can feel the fork moving but when attempting to pry out the tranny, it only moves out about half inch and the gets stuck and the play on the fork is gone. obviously is getting stuck with the fork but why? am I missing something?
December 7, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Will the slave come out of the trans? - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Blaze-n-James Comments: Removed 996 awd tranny to find that the Bell housing severely cracked in two places from top to bottom. In addition noticed that whom ever reppaced tranny before I bought it had welded the Bell housing prior to install. This mind you as 64000 miles...Now at 112,000 not to mention a tab from the engine block busted off as well... WTF does one do to fix this mess?
November 20, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Replace the housing or trans. Not much else you can do. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Rodmunch Comments: Just to,say thank you for your really helpful instructions and photos on all sorts of porsche related matters . Please keep up the great work .
October 31, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the feedback. Glad we could help.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Ron Comments: Where can I get the tool to remove these tri square bolts? I think there are other tri square bolts on the door but a differt size .
September 6, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: We have them. Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can help you find the right socket. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Adam Comments: So I've done all my work and I'm trying to reinstall the trans. New clutch, new flywheel, new ims, etc. I cannot get the input shaft all the way into the motor. I have about half an inch between the bell housing and the block. We are not able to spin the output disks of the trans at all, this tells me that the splines should already have grabbed on. It seems like the tip of the input shaft will not go into the flywheel. But my clutch alignment tool fits perfectly. What am I missing?
August 6, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: A few things. Did you replace the pilot bearing? Did you check if the clutch disc fit over the trans splines before installing it? - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Sherif Comments: I have a carrera 996.1 3.4 L engine i hade a transmission complete failure I bought a second hand transmission when I first start it the cooler of the new transmission was damaged so water entered the transmission oil cycle and oil went into the water cooling cycle of the engine I changed the cooler and the gear box oil as well but I still have traces of water in the gear box which is affecting the color of the oil and true in from transparent to white
The transmission if performing well but the indicator on the dashboard is flickering between D and 4 the automatic tiptronic transmission is. Zf 5hp19 HL I live in Egypt and the porsche dealer here is very weak so please help me in what to do
Is there any commen way to remove the water completely from the transmission cycle
And how to remove thw transmission oil from the engine cooling water
January 13, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: You can try removing the cooler lines, then pumping fluid in one line while allowing it to exit the other. Do this until the stream is pure ATF. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
mike Comments: 2004 996tt replacing clutch stage 2 bought from u.
my slave cylinder looks a bit bigger than ur pic and has a big black accumulator which make it has to get to one bolt.
Can I remove it and then replace it without having to bleed clutch system ?
December 6, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: You can unbolt them and move them up, do not open a line. If you do, you will have to bleed it. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
topcoat1 Comments: Im confused on why the engine needs to be supported? doesnt it have its own mounts? this isn't the same as a bug?
November 16, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: It share the rear mounting with the trans. With the trans removed, the engine will hang, flywheel side down. It needs support. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
pieter1 Comments: Well the trany is out yes its possible to pull the tiptronic without removing the engine. All I can say is take your time, have patiens. And yes cuss at all those German Porsche engineers that tried to fit 30 pounds of crap in a 5 pound bag. So much easier to work on a Boxster.
July 7, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the input on this one. We appreciate the help.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Pieter1 Comments: Hi Anything special I need to know on how to remove a tiptronic trans. Does it have bolts on the flex plate that secures the Torque converter. I am new to Porsche and bought a 2001 996 with bad IMS.
June 19, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Yes, the bolts for the flex=plate have to be removed. The tip is a bit harder as there is less room. You will have to access the bolts through the starter hole in the transmission. There are six 6mm Allen bolts in pairs of two.


I would grab a repair manual. It will have the procedure, special tools and torque specs.

Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799 - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
craigT Comments: how high does the car need to be jacked up to have enough clearance to get the tranny out?
June 17, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I would say 24 inches or so. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Alex Comments: I have a 2000 year Carrera - 4. Your photos/instructions are very good, are there any specific points I need to know for the Carrera - 4?
June 4, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: You will have to remove the all-wheel drive components as well. I would grab a repair manual. It will have the procedure, special tools and torque specs.

Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
1-ev.com Comments: the red jack on figs 11 & 13.
August 10, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: These are typical scissor type jacks that are available commercially - Kerry at Pelican Parts  
1-ev.com Comments: Will this jack hold Engine and Tranny together?
http://www.pelicanparts.com/techarticles/Porsche-996-997-Carrera/37-TRANS-Transmission_Removal/images_thumbs/pic11.jpg
August 8, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: The thumbnail you shared is too smal for me to make out the detail of the jack.

I use a hydraulic motorcycle / ATV jack to lower engine and transmissions together. Works great and has a nice flat long top sections to balance the engine on. I also strap the engine to jack when doing this to help prevent it from falling off. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 

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