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Modifying Your Wheelwell Liners - Porsche 911 Carrera & Boxster
 

Pelican Technical Article:

Modifying Your Wheelwell Liners - Porsche 911 Carrera & Boxster

Time:

8 hrs

Tab:

$0

Talent:

***

Tools:

10mm and 13mm Sockets and Socket Wrench, Phillips Screwdriver, Flathead Screwdriver, T-25 Torx Driver, Pliers or a Crowbar, Dremel, File, 2 ZipTies.

Applicable Models:

Porsche 996 Carrera models (1999-05)
Porsche 996 Turbo, GT2, GT3 (2001-05)

Hot Tip:

Wear goggles, remove both front tires, use jack stands.

Performance Gain:

Improved brake cooling.

Complementary Modification:

Service the front brakes, radiators or radiator fans.

The 2005 and later (997) use a newer style wheelwell liner that reduces lift and drag while diverting more air to the brake cooling system. While these new liners can not be installed in a 1998-2005 (996) Carrera it is a fun and easy mod to do on your earlier car. You can convert your front wheelwell liners to use the air that passes through the radiators to cool your front brakes, like the design on the 997 Carrera. The newer liners allow the air used to cool the radiators into the wheelwell and assist in cooling the brakes. It also has the added bonus of reducing drag and lift. So, if you're handy with a Dremel (and if you're not, now would be a good time to practice), you can easily create your own set of 997 brake ducts following this guide.

Start off by jacking up the car and removing both front wheels. Next, remove your front bumper and both front wheelwell liners (see Pelican Technical Article: Front Bumper Wheel Liner Replacement on the Porsche 911 Carrera). Now, remove the front radiator air ducts, which are held in place by five T-25 Torx screws (green arrows in picture 1). Remove the ambient temperature sensor on the passenger side air duct by simply pushing it out with a flathead screwdriver (see inset of picture 1).

Next, using a zip tie, tie the upper end of each radiator to the plastic bracket above it as a way to hold the radiator while removing the rear metal frame. Once the ties are in place, remove the two side clamps of each radiator by lifting the metal tab with a flathead screwdriver and pushing it out.

Now, remove the metal bracket holding the radiator to the chassis by removing the T-25 Torx screw behind the plastic radiator fan duct, the 13mm nut on the side and the two 13mm bolts underneath. Also, unclip the two blue clamps attached to each radiator bracket with a flathead screwdriver and the air sensor located on the inside corner of the metal radiator bracket. Once all has been completed, remove both the metal bracket and radiator fan duct for modification (see picture 3).

On a flat surface, take your metal brackets and align it with the plastic fan ducts to give you an idea of where to make your cut. I found it useful to utilize the existing Torx screws for more accurate markings. Now take a permanent marker and draw vertical lines and a lower horizontal base on the fan duct to represent the brake cooling slits in the 997 fender liner (see inset photo of picture 4). Next, using a Dremel (wear safety goggles), carefully cutout the highlighted areas. You can also use a file to clean up the edges.

Next, take your fender liner and similarly, draw vertical lines and highlight a lower horizontal base. Again, I found it useful to align the metal bracket, fan duct and fender lining for more accurate markings. Once that's done, take your Dremel and carefully make your cuts.

Clean up the edges and don't worry if your cuts are too large, too small, awkward-looking, etc. since it will not be easily visible to the naked eye and will only help cool those brake rotors. Enjoy!

Remove the five T-25 Torx screws (green arrows) and push the ambient temperature sensor through the opening to remove each air duct.
Figure 1

Remove the five T-25 Torx screws (green arrows) and push the ambient temperature sensor through the opening to remove each air duct.

Tie the upper end of each radiator to the plastic bracket above it as a way to hold the radiator while removing the rear metal frame.
Figure 2

Tie the upper end of each radiator to the plastic bracket above it as a way to hold the radiator while removing the rear metal frame. Once the ties are in place, remove the two side clamps of each radiator by lifting the metal tab with a flathead screwdriver and pushing it out (inset photo).

Now, remove the metal bracket holding the radiator to the chassis by removing the T-25 Torx screw behind the plastic radiator fan duct (green arrow), the 13mm nut on the side (yellow arrow) and the two 13mm bolts underneath (inset photo).
Figure 3

Now, remove the metal bracket holding the radiator to the chassis by removing the T-25 Torx screw behind the plastic radiator fan duct (green arrow), the 13mm nut on the side (yellow arrow) and the two 13mm bolts underneath (inset photo). Also, unclip the two blue clamps attached to each radiator bracket with a flathead screwdriver (one visibly shown - blue arrow) and the air sensor located on the inside corner of the metal radiator bracket (red arrow).

Align the bracket and fan duct to make your cut.
Figure 4

Align the bracket and fan duct to make your cut. With a marker, draw vertical lines and a lower horizontal base on the fan duct to represent the brake cooling slits in the 997 fender liner. Use a Dremel (wear safety goggles) to carefully cutout the highlighted areas and then file the edges down for a cleaner look. The top two inserts on the left show the modifying of the inner wheelwell liner and the bottom shows the newer style liner from the 997.

Next, take your fender liner and similarly, draw vertical lines and highlight a lower horizontal base.
Figure 5

Next, take your fender liner and similarly, draw vertical lines and highlight a lower horizontal base. Again, I found it useful to align the metal bracket, fan duct and fender lining for more accurate markings. Once that's done, take your Dremel and carefully make your cut.

Figure 6

Enjoy your new 996 brake cooling ducts!

Comments and Suggestions:
Juha K. Comments: There is an article which covers the 996-997 cooling channel development by a Porsche Engineer Thomas Wolf in the Bernoulli Aerodynamics International magazine/journal, volume 1, issue 004, pages 44-57. iSSN 1751-2670. Racecar Graphic Ltd.

Based on that article I would say this is not a bed mod.
June 7, 2017
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the additional info and feedback. We appreciate it.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
RS10 Comments: Very interesting modification. The article states that this "reduces lift and drag". Can I ask what is the basis for this conclusion? I have no information to the contrary. But on the other hand, there's an ongoing discussion of this at rennlist, and thus far the most authoritative source for this conclusion in your article. So I figure that if anyone has futher info to back this up, it's probably you.
Thanks!
January 1, 2017
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: The basis of the conclusion is the air flow change as well as increase of air flow. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
DWS964 Comments: With this modification, does the large opening on the bottom remain open, or do you close it off so that all air from the radiator exit via the new openings?
April 18, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I believe it stays open. - Nick at Pelican Parts  

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Page last updated: Wed 12/13/2017 02:34:03 AM