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Power Steering Hose Replacement
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

Power Steering Hose Replacement

Steve Vernon

Time:

2 hours2 hrs

Tab:

$30 to $400

Talent:

***

Tools:

Philips head screwdriver, 19mm, 17mm, 15mm wrench

Applicable Models:

Porsche 993 Carrera (1995-98)
Porsche 993 Carrera 4 (1995-98)
Porsche 993 Carrera 4S (1996-98)
Porsche 993 Carrera S (1998)
Porsche 993 Targa (1996-98)
Porsche 993 Turbo (1996-97)

Parts Required:

Hoses, fluid

Hot Tip:

Have the right tool for the hose clamps

Performance Gain:

Functioning power steering

Complementary Modification:

Replace the fluid reservoir

The power steering pump for the 993 is located on the front right side of the motor and driven off a belt from a pulley attached to the camshaft. There are three hoses that need to be inspected and replaced if any signs of bulging, dry rot, leaks or cracks appear. There is a rubber supply line out from the reservoir to the pump, then a high pressure line out to the rack and a return line from the front of the car back to the reservoir. The high pressure pump out line is the most prone to failure and should be inspected carefully.

You will need to add fluid and should consider replacing the reservoir as it contains the filter along with flushing and bleeding the system. Porsche changed the type of power steering fluid that they use in the system. Up until March of 1996 Porsche used Dexron II D ATF and for cars produced after March of 1996 Porsche switched to Pentosin (CHF 11S) fluid. These fluids can be mixed and you can add Pentosin to Dexron if you are topping up the system but both Porsche and Pelican recommend you flush, refill and bleed the system with Pentosin. Please see our article on flushing and bleeding your power steering system.

Power steering fluid is very messy and slippery so have a lot of rags around to help clean things up as you go and make sure to catch and dispose of fluid in accordance to the regulations in your region.

The power steering reservoir is located inside the engine compartment on the right side.
Figure 1

The power steering reservoir is located inside the engine compartment on the right side. To access the reservoir and lines you will need to remove the airbox (red arrow). Please see our articles on Varioram and non-Varioram airbox removal for further instructions.

With the airbox removed you can see the reservoir (red arrow) and get access to the supply and return lines.
Figure 2

With the airbox removed you can see the reservoir (red arrow) and get access to the supply and return lines.

There are three lines for the power steering system in the rear of the car; the hose supplying fluid from the reservoir to the pump (red arrow), the pressure out line from the pump to the rack (yellow arrow) and the return line to the reservoir (blue line).
Figure 3

There are three lines for the power steering system in the rear of the car; the hose supplying fluid from the reservoir to the pump (red arrow), the pressure out line from the pump to the rack (yellow arrow) and the return line to the reservoir (blue line).

Begin by sucking as much fluid as you can out from the system, you can use a turkey baster but the reservoir is a little under the rear quarter panel so a proper fluid extractor helps.
Figure 4

Begin by sucking as much fluid as you can out from the system, you can use a turkey baster but the reservoir is a little under the rear quarter panel so a proper fluid extractor helps.

With all the fluid you can get sucked out from the top removed place a few rags under the reservoir (yellow arrow); even though you have removed the fluid some will still be in the bottom of the reservoir and spill out.
Figure 5

With all the fluid you can get sucked out from the top removed place a few rags under the reservoir (yellow arrow); even though you have removed the fluid some will still be in the bottom of the reservoir and spill out. Depending on whether you have an original reservoir or who replaced the one in your vehicle in the past you can find all kinds of differing hose clamps. Use the correct tool for your clamps and remove the supply hose (red arrow) from the reservoir and pump to replace it.

The reservoir is held to the vehicle by a clamp that wraps around the mount on the inside (yellow arrow) of the rear quarter panel.
Figure 6

The reservoir is held to the vehicle by a clamp that wraps around the mount on the inside (yellow arrow) of the rear quarter panel. Depending on how easy it is for you to get at the return hose on the bottom of the reservoir you can either loosen the clamp or remove it as we did to remove the reservoir from the mount. Remove the clamp on the return line (red arrow).

The pressure out line from the pump is attached by a banjo fitting on the side, use 17mm wrench and disconnect the line (red arrow) and always install new crush washers when installing the new line.
Figure 7

The pressure out line from the pump is attached by a banjo fitting on the side, use 17mm wrench and disconnect the line (red arrow) and always install new crush washers when installing the new line. The line comes out from the pump and runs towards the rear of the vehicle until it turns right and wraps behind the oil filler neck and cap (yellow arrow).

The pressure line (blue arrow) along with the return line are held in place by a plastic bracket mounted inside the rear right of the engine compartment; use a 15mm wrench and remove the plastic bolt holding the bracket together (red arrow).
Figure 8

The pressure line (blue arrow) along with the return line are held in place by a plastic bracket mounted inside the rear right of the engine compartment; use a 15mm wrench and remove the plastic bolt holding the bracket together (red arrow).

Follow the lines towards the forward section on the right side of the engine compartment where you find another plastic holder; use a 15mm wrench and remove the bolt holding it in place (red arrow).
Figure 9

Follow the lines towards the forward section on the right side of the engine compartment where you find another plastic holder; use a 15mm wrench and remove the bolt holding it in place (red arrow). make sure you follow the line you are replacing as there are three lines here; The pressure line (yellow arrow) which needs a 19mm wrench to support the fitting and a 17mm wrench to loosen the line (yellow arrow). The return line will be a hose clamp (blue arrow). There is also a fuel line that runs to the filter make sure to leave this alone.

To bleed the system refill the reservoir and quickly turn the motor on and off; this will cause the level in the reservoir to drop rapidly so do not let the engine run long as this can introduce air into the system.
Figure 10

To bleed the system: Refill the reservoir and quickly turn the motor on and off; this will cause the level in the reservoir to drop rapidly so do not let the engine run long as this can introduce air into the system. If possible have a friend watch but do NOT let the reservoir run dry. Once you can start the engine and the level does not drop let the motor idle and turn the steering wheel quickly and at an even pace from lock to lock several times to bleed the air out of the system. Do not force the wheel when turning. Continue this procedure until the level remains constant and there are no more air bubbles in the system. The level is set with the fluid warm and the engine idling with the vehicle on level ground.

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