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Replacing Rear Sway Bar Bushings
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

Replacing Rear Sway Bar Bushings

Steve Vernon

Time:

2 hours2 hrs

Tab:

$5 to $15

Talent:

**

Tools:

E10, E14 Torx, 16mm socket

Applicable Models:

Mercedes-Benz W203 (2001-07)

Parts Required:

New stabilizer or sway bar bushings

Hot Tip:

Clean and paint the bar

Performance Gain:

Better handling

Complementary Modification:

Install performance struts and springs

If you are starting to hear a knocking sound from the rear of the car when you go around a corner there is a good chance your sway or stabilizer bar bushings are starting to go bad. These bushing get a lot of wear and tear and they do wear out. You should check your rear sway bar every 30,000 miles. If you are going to be replacing the bushings it is a good idea to completely drop the bar and clean and paint it while you are performing the work. If you want a little sportier handling performance from your Mercedes you may want to consider upgrading your stock bars to a thicker or sportier bar and bushing combination.

You will need to jack up the car and remove the rear wheels to perform this job, please see our article on safely jacking up and supporting your Mercedes.

The rear sway bar mounts are located in front of the rear axel on each side of the car. While you can get access to them without dropping the under body trays it does make the job a little easier if you lower that rear of the trays to give you more room to work. Please see our article on removing your under body trays.

Begin by remove the nut attaching the sway bar to the drop link. You will need to hold the E14 reverse Torx on the link while you use a 16mm socket and remove the nut.

Next use an E10 reverse Torx and remove the two long bolts holding the bushing and bar to the mount.

With everything removed on both sides of the car you can remove the bar. Inspect the bar for damage. This is also a good time to re-spray the bar to give it further protection from the elements. Make sure to clean the bushing mount well before reinstalling the old or new bushing. Dirt between the bushing and mount can cause a heck of a squeaking.

Installation is the reverse of removal

From under the car you can see the sway bar (red arrows), its mount and bushing (green arrow) along with where it mounts to the drop link (yellow arrow).
Figure 1

From under the car you can see the sway bar (red arrows), its mount and bushing (green arrow) along with where it mounts to the drop link (yellow arrow).

Begin by remove the nut attaching the sway bar to the drop link.
Figure 2

Begin by remove the nut attaching the sway bar to the drop link. You will need to hold the E14 reverse Torx (yellow arrow) on the link while you use a 16mm socket (red arrow) and remove the nut.

Next use an E10 reverse Torx and remove the two long bolts (red arrows) holding the bushing and bar to the mount.
Figure 3

Next use an E10 reverse Torx and remove the two long bolts (red arrows) holding the bushing and bar to the mount.

With everything removed on both sides of the car; the drop link (yellow arrows) and the mount (red arrows) you can remove the bar.
Figure 4

With everything removed on both sides of the car; the drop link (yellow arrows) and the mount (red arrows) you can remove the bar. Inspect the bar for damage. This is also a good time to re-spray the bar to give it further protection from the elements. Make sure to clean the bushing mount well before reinstalling the old or new bushing (green arrow). Dirt between the bushing and mount can cause a heck of a squeaking.

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Comments and Suggestions:
chrss Comments: I was checking this problem out the other day and found that with my hand, I could move the drop link connected to the sway bar, while the car was jacked. Is this normal? I've been hearing that clunking sound and think this might be the problem. Also, do you recommend replacing that rubber bushing as well?
June 8, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: It should be tight on most models. Give The Pelican Parts parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can figure out what part or repair kit you need.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
fixalone Comments: 2007 c280 4matic how to replace rear coil spring and should I replace both springs and shocks?
June 6, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Yes, replace the set.

We don't currently have that tech article. If we get a chance to perform the procedure, we will be sure to document it.

I would grab a repair manual. It will have the procedure, special tools and torque specs.

Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
fixalone Comments: how to replace rear coil springs. should I replace both springs and shocks?
June 6, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: We don't currently have that tech article. If we get a chance to perform the procedure, we will be sure to document it.

I would grab a repair manual. It will have the procedure, special tools and torque specs.

Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
mercedesgirl Comments: I have not had my Mercedes 09 for a year and I am already having to get things fixed is this even possible?
I just got my left rear sway bar replaced less than a month ago. I started hearing a noise again. Can it be that the right side now needs to be replaced too? Would they have not noticed that the other side needed to be replaced and not say anything? I'm thinking they did a temporary fix to get me out the shop and come back again..
Any advice or suggestions? I am considering taking it back and just have someone else in the shop look at it or just got to another Merecedes shop.
April 14, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: a 2009 is not new, so parts can and will be worn. I would suggest a second opinion if you don't trust the diagnosis. - Nick at Pelican Parts  

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Page last updated: Fri 12/9/2016 02:28:43 AM