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Crankshaft Positioning Sensor Replacement
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

Crankshaft Positioning Sensor Replacement

Tom Morr

Time:

1 hour1 hr

Tab:

$30

Talent:

*

Tools:

E8 reverse Torx, socket and extensions

Applicable Models:

Mercedes-Benz R170 (1998-04)

Parts Required:

New CPS

Hot Tip:

Remove the sensor with the wiring attached

Performance Gain:

Smoother running car

Complementary Modification:

Replace Camshaft positioning sensor

Your fuel injection computer (DME) may output a code that indicates a faulty camshaft position sensor (CPS). This important sensor tells the car's computer where the flywheel is located in relation to the combustion cycle. The DME takes the signals from both the cam position sensor and crankshaft position sensor, and calculates when to fire the fuel injectors and spark plugs. If the crankshaft position sensor is not operating properly, your car will run very erratically or perhaps not at all.

Replacement of the crankshaft sensor is not as easy as the camshaft sensor, but can be done easily in under an hour. The crankshaft sensor is located on the left side of the engine at the rear, on the bell housing.

Working from the left side of the car, locate the crankshaft sensor. You may have to move a few of the hoses and vacuum lines to get your hands in there but you do not need to disconnect anything.

It is a good idea to remove the sensor with the wiring harness attached. The clips on the harness get brittle with age and heat and you do not want to break the clip off, also, if you drop the sensor it makes it a lot easier to find.

Use an E8 reverse Torx socket and a long extension. There is very little room to turn a socket down where the sensor is located and a long extension really makes the job easier.

Remove the single E8 bolt. Wiggle the sensor out of its socket.

Lift the sensor out and carefully squeeze in the top of the retaining clip and separate the sensor from harness.

Installation is the reverse of removal

Working from the left side of the car, locate the crankshaft sensor.
Figure 1

Working from the left side of the car, locate the crankshaft sensor. You may have to move a few of the hoses and vacuum lines to get your hands in there but you do not need to disconnect anything.

It is a good idea to remove the sensor with the wiring harness attached.
Figure 2

It is a good idea to remove the sensor with the wiring harness attached. The clips on the harness get brittle with age and heat and you do not want to break the clip off, also, if you drop the sensor it makes it a lot easier to find. Use an E8 reverse Torx socket (yellow arrow) and a long extension (red arrow). There is very little room to turn a socket down where the sensor is located and a long extension really makes the job easier.

Remove the single E8 bolt.
Figure 3

Remove the single E8 bolt. Wiggle the sensor out of its socket. Lift the sensor out and carefully squeeze in the top of the retaining clip (red arrow) and separate the sensor from harness.

Figure 4

Even thought the sensor has failed you may not be able to see anything wrong with it

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Comments and Suggestions:
Frustrated Comments: Wiggle it loose seems comical to me. Mine feels like it's been super glued in. I can't move it at all. I've PB Blasted. I've nearly destroyed the thing prying on it. I'm not sure what to do.
May 29, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: They do get stuck. You may have to destroy the sensor, removing it in pieces. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Romeo Comments: My 99 slk230 its only cranking but not fireing up do u guys thinking it could. Be tha sensor. .plz help
April 16, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I can't help without knowing what is missing from the system when you are trying to start it. When your engine doesn’t start you’ll want to check the basics. Check spark, fuel injector pulse and fuel pressure, volume, quality and engine compression. Are there any fault codes? Once you figure out what is missing, it will be easier to diagnose.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
jim Comments: Looking for a crankshaft MB SLK 230- R170. If you could help I would appreciate it very much
December 1, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I’m not the best with part numbers.

Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can figure out what part or repair kit you need.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Half Dead Comments: you dudes r the greatest help since vicegrips were invented!!!!! I 've saved over $1,900.00 in labor prices alone on my wifes sauerkraut mobile ....we bought it new in 2000 and only hsve 63000 miles on her I glad we hooked up with sum real pros now as I have changed many components at an astronomical price ....I was about to shitcan her when I found you guys youse guys are better than a hooker in a troop carrier Thanx....Darrell Taylor
July 18, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the feedback. Glad we could help.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 

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