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Pelican Technical Article:

Replacing Rear Brake Lines

Mike Holloway

Time:

30 min

Tab:

$50 to $100

Talent:

**

Tools:

9mm, 14mm open end wrenches

Applicable Models:

Mercedes-Benz R107 (1972-89)

Parts Required:

Brake line, brake fluid

Hot Tip:

Rinse down wheels prior to work to reduce dust

Performance Gain:

A braking system that will stop your car

Complementary Modification:

Change brake pads

The brake lines convey the brake fluid to the brake pads allowing the car to slow down or stop. Over time the lines can crack and become brittle. If this occurs you will lose brake fluid and possibly the ability to stop your car. Changing brake lines will also require charging the system with new fluid. It is not advised to recycle the brake fluid. The brake lines for each wheel are located in the wheel wells.

To do this tech project you will need to safely jack up the rear of your M-B and remove the rear wheels. Consult the Pelican Parts tech article on safely jacking and supporting your M-B.

Before you do any work on your car it is important that you wear safety glasses, work gloves and dispose of all fluids in a safe manner. If you have to jack up your car, make sure to use jack stands and chock your wheels as well as applying the parking brake. Protect your eyes, hands and body from fluids, dust and debris while working on your vehicle. If you're working with the electrical system, disconnect the battery before beginning. Always catch fluids in appropriate containers and properly dispose of any fluid waste. Recycle parts, packaging and fluids when possible. Never work on your vehicle if you feel the task is beyond your ability. Always wear eye and hand protection.

It is easiest (and far less messy) if you remove the brake fluid.
Figure 1

It is easiest (and far less messy) if you remove the brake fluid. Using the Mityvac® or a hand held vacuum oil pump, remove as much of the brake fluid as possible from the brake fluid reservoir. Try not to spill any because it is corrosive as well as toxic to animals.

Attach the bleed screw adaptor to the suction hose of the Mityvac® oil vacuum pump.
Figure 2

Attach the bleed screw adaptor to the suction hose of the Mityvac® oil vacuum pump.

Remove the bleeder screw cap located on the brake caliper.
Figure 3

Remove the bleeder screw cap located on the brake caliper. Attach the bleed screw adaptor to the bleed screw. If you don't have a Mityvac® oil vacuum pump don't sweat it. You can still bleed the brakes. Instead of hooking up the Mityvac® to the bleeder screw, simply use a rubber tube found at the hardware store and make sure you allow the brake fluid that will be bled off to do so into the container. You shouldn't reuse the fluid but simply dispose of it according to local and federal regulations. Connect the bleed tube assembly to the Mityvac®.

Connect compressed air to the quick disconnect nipple to the swivel air inlet located near the handle.
Figure 4

Connect compressed air to the quick disconnect nipple to the swivel air inlet located near the handle. The system is now ready to use.

Using a 9mm open end line wrench, turn the bleed screw clockwise to open the flow of brake fluid.
Figure 5

Using a 9mm open end line wrench, turn the bleed screw clockwise to open the flow of brake fluid. Try not to spill any because it is corrosive as well as toxic to animals.

There is a lever on the handle which you press forward to activate the vacuum action.
Figure 6

There is a lever on the handle which you press forward to activate the vacuum action. Push forward to the 'ON' position. You should hear a sucking sound. If you don't check to see that you have your compressed air turned on. Bleed the brake line completely using the Mityvac®; first start by connecting the bleed screw adaptor on to the bleed tube assembly then loosen the screw using a 9mm open end wrench while having someone else pump the brakes. If you're using the Mityvac®, it should begin to fill with brake fluid. Empty all of the fluid from the lines. Repeat for all the wheels.

Using a 14mm open-end brake line wrench, loosen and dissemble the flexible brake line.
Figure 7

Using a 14mm open-end brake line wrench, loosen and dissemble the flexible brake line.

Using a 14mm open-end wrench, loosen and dissemble the brake line from the caliper.
Figure 8

Using a 14mm open-end wrench, loosen and dissemble the brake line from the caliper. After the line has been removed, install the new line to the caliper and then the hard line. Repeat the process for the other side. The system is now ready to be charged with new fluid. You should bleed air as fluid is being charged to the system. For more information on bleeding your brakes, read the Pelican Parts tech article on properly bleeding your brakes.

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Page last updated: Wed 12/7/2016 02:47:39 AM