Mercedes-Benz Parts Catalog Mercedes-Benz Accessories Catalog Mercedes-Benz Technical Articles Mercedes-Benz Tech Forums
 
Follow Pelican Parts on Facebook Follow Pelican Parts on Twitter Follow Pelican Parts on Instagram Follow Pelican Parts on YouTube Follow Pelican Parts on Pinterest Follow Pelican Parts on Tumblr
  Search our site:    
View Recent Cars  |   Cart  | Project List | Order Status | Help    
Bookmark and Share

Pelican Technical Article:

Replacing Rear Brake Calipers

Mike Holloway

Time:

30 minutes30 mins

Tab:

$50 to $250

Talent:

**

Tools:

14mm wrench, 10mm, 11mm, 15mm, and 19mm socket wrench, needle nose pliers, breaker bar, floor jack, jack stands, wheel chocks, safety glasses, lug wrench

Applicable Models:

Mercedes-Benz R107 (1972-89)

Parts Required:

Rear calipers

Hot Tip:

Wash the wheel down or vacuum to remove dust

Performance Gain:

Better stopping

Complementary Modification:

Change brake fluid

All models of the Mercedes-Benz 450SL from 1972 through 1989 use fixed calipers on the rear brakes. Some rear brake calipers are only installed on vehicles where the axle shaft is supported on grooved ball bearings. Calipers with a compensating feature may be installed on axles with grooved ball bearings or self-aligning bearings. After removing the caliper, spray an evaporative cleaner or at least water on the parts before disassembly. Asbestos, a known carcinogen, is often used in brake components. By hosing off the rear brake assembly before beginning this project, the job will be much easier and safer. You could also wear a mask or respirator when working on the rear brakes. Better safe than sorry.

The rear of the car should be jacked up and supported by jack stands and the wheels chocked. The wheel has to be removed. Please refer to our article on safely jacking and supporting your M-B 450SL for more information.

Brakes can produce dust, which may be harmful if inhaled. The common way that most people will remove dust is to use compressed air and blow the dust out of the component. I highly discourage that activity. Blowing out the dust only puts it in to the air and then into your lungs. It is strongly advised to vacuum up the dust with a shop vacuum or at the very least wetting down the brakes and rotor with water. This should minimize the dust.

Before you do any work on your car it is important that you wear safety glasses, work gloves and dispose of all fluids in a safe manner. If you have to jack up your car, make sure to use jack stands and chock your wheels as well as applying the parking brake. Protect your eyes, hands and body from fluids, dust and debris while working on your vehicle. If you're working with the electrical system, disconnect the battery before beginning. Always catch fluids in appropriate containers and properly dispose of any fluid waste. Recycle parts, packaging and fluids when possible. Never work on your vehicle if you feel the task is beyond your ability. Always wear eye and hand protection.

After the wheel has been removed, you can wet the brake down to wash away any dust.
Figure 1

After the wheel has been removed, you can wet the brake down to wash away any dust. After the wheel dries vacuum up the remaining dust. 

Changing the calipers provides an excellent opportunity to change the brake fluid.
Figure 2

Changing the calipers provides an excellent opportunity to change the brake fluid. In order to replace the fluid you must first drain the lines and the reservoir. Remove the bleeder screw cap located on the brake caliper.

The easiest way to bleed the brake line is to use the Mityvac®; first start by connecting the bleed screw adaptor on to the bleed tube assembly.
Figure 3

The easiest way to bleed the brake line is to use the Mityvac®; first start by connecting the bleed screw adaptor on to the bleed tube assembly. 

Connect the bleed tube assembly to the Mityvac®.
Figure 4

Connect the bleed tube assembly to the Mityvac®.

Connect compressed air to the quick disconnect nipple to the swivel air inlet located near the handle.
Figure 5

Connect compressed air to the quick disconnect nipple to the swivel air inlet located near the handle. The system is now ready to use.

Attach the bleed screw adaptor to the bleed screw.
Figure 6

Attach the bleed screw adaptor to the bleed screw.

Using a 9mm open end wrench, turn the bleed screw clockwise to open the flow of brake fluid.
Figure 7

Using a 9mm open end wrench, turn the bleed screw clockwise to open the flow of brake fluid.

There is a lever on the handle that you press forward to activate the vacuum action.
Figure 8

There is a lever on the handle that you press forward to activate the vacuum action. Push forward to the 'ON' position. You should hear a sucking sound. If you don't check to see that you have the compressed air turned on. 

The Mityvac® should begin to fill with brake fluid.
Figure 9

The Mityvac® should begin to fill with brake fluid. 

If the flow doesn't appear strong, you may want to open up the brake fluid reservoir cap to allow for greater flow.
Figure 10

If the flow doesn't appear strong, you may want to open up the brake fluid reservoir cap to allow for greater flow. You can also drain the majority of the fluid straight from the brake reservoir using the Mityvac® or a hand pump as pictured.    

Using a 10mm wrench, loosen and remove the brake sensor from the caliper.
Figure 11

Using a 10mm wrench, loosen and remove the brake sensor from the caliper.

Using a 15mm socket loosen but don't remove the four bolts joining both sides of the calipers.
Figure 12

Using a 15mm socket loosen but don't remove the four bolts joining both sides of the calipers.

With a pair of needle nose pliers, remove the locking eyes from the end of the retaining pins as shown.
Figure 13

With a pair of needle nose pliers, remove the locking eyes from the end of the retaining pins as shown.

Remove the second locking eye with needle nose pliers.
Figure 14

Remove the second locking eye with needle nose pliers. This will enable you to push the retaining pins out.

Use a 5/16-inch center punch and hammer to remove the retaining pin form the caliper.
Figure 15

Use a 5/16-inch center punch and hammer to remove the retaining pin form the caliper. There are two pins.

Be careful not to hit the pins too hard, as you may damage the calipers or rotor.
Figure 16

Be careful not to hit the pins too hard, as you may damage the calipers or rotor.

With the needle nose pliers, remove the brake pad retaining spring.
Figure 17

With the needle nose pliers, remove the brake pad retaining spring. 

Using a 15mm socket wrench loosen but don't remove the four bolts that hold the calipers together.
Figure 18

Using a 15mm socket wrench loosen but don't remove the four bolts that hold the calipers together.

Using needle nose pliers, pull the pad out.
Figure 19

Using needle nose pliers, pull the pad out.

Examine the brake pad for wear.
Figure 20

Examine the brake pad for wear.

Using a 15mm socket wrench, continue to dissemble the caliper from the wheel.
Figure 21

Using a 15mm socket wrench, continue to dissemble the caliper from the wheel.

The caliper is free from the wheel and can now be replaced with a new brake caliper.
Figure 22

The caliper is free from the wheel and can now be replaced with a new brake caliper. Installation is the reverse of removal.

Bookmark and Share

  Search our site:    

View Cart & CheckOut | Project List | Order Status |  Help    

 

[Home] [Customer Service] [Shopping Cart] [Project/Wish List]
  [Privacy Statement]  [Contact Us] [About Us] [Shipping] [Careers]

Copyright © Pelican Parts Inc. -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page

Page last updated: Mon 12/5/2016 02:45:36 AM