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Pelican Technical Article:

Starter Overhaul

Mike Holloway

Time:

1 hour1 hr

Tab:

$1 to $300

Talent:

**

Tools:

10mm open ended wrench, 10 mm socket wrench, flat face screwdriver, Phillips head screwdriver

Applicable Models:

Mercedes-Benz R107 (1972-89)

Parts Required:

Starter

Hot Tip:

Use a penetrating release spray

Performance Gain:

An engine that starts

Complementary Modification:

Replace wires

The starter is used to initiate the combustion cycle. Before the starter was invented, engines would need to be hand cranked in order to begin the combustion process. The starter employs a powerful electric motor and is only designed for short term bursts. The electrical components are designed only to operate for typically under 20 seconds. Extended use results in overheating. The owner's manual instructs the operator to pause for at least ten seconds after each ten or fifteen seconds of turning the key. Prolonged engagement of the starter motor will result in overheating and eventual failure. Replacing the starter has been considered a difficult task due to the location as well as not knowing which tools to use. Fortunately the article which instructs how to remove it makes the process manageable. Read the article on removing the starter before following the starter overhaul procedures below.

The starter is susceptible to failure due to the demand that is placed upon it. While it may be easy to replace the whole unit with a new or rebuilt one, it is possible to overhaul the existing one.

Using a 10mm open end wrench, remove the electrical lead bracket.
Figure 1

Using a 10mm open end wrench, remove the electrical lead bracket. This will also allow for access to the tie bolt.

Using a 10mm socket wrench, loosen and remove the tie bolts.
Figure 2

Using a 10mm socket wrench, loosen and remove the tie bolts.

Using a flat face screwdriver, loosen and remove the back cover exposing the lock washer.
Figure 3

Using a flat face screwdriver, loosen and remove the back cover exposing the lock washer.

Slip the lock washer and release the armature from the housing.
Figure 4

Slip the lock washer and release the armature from the housing.

Remove the end cover and examine the armature for signs of wear or corrosion.
Figure 5

Remove the end cover and examine the armature for signs of wear or corrosion.

With the end cover off, you can now examine the brushes for signs of corrosion or wear.
Figure 6

With the end cover off, you can now examine the brushes for signs of corrosion or wear. The brushes are actually small copper blocks. These can be replaced.

Using a 10mm socket wrench, loosen and remove the engagement lever pivot bolt.
Figure 7

Using a 10mm socket wrench, loosen and remove the engagement lever pivot bolt.

Remove the drive end cover and examine the gear and engagement lever for wear.
Figure 8

Remove the drive end cover and examine the gear and engagement lever for wear.

Using a flat head screwdriver, loosen and remove the screws holding the solenoid.
Figure 9

Using a flat head screwdriver, loosen and remove the screws holding the solenoid.

With the solenoid removed, unscrew the leads to the solenoid using a Phillips head screwdriver.
Figure 10

With the solenoid removed, unscrew the leads to the solenoid using a Phillips head screwdriver.

Using a 13mm wrench, loosen and remove the main current line for the solenoid.
Figure 11

Using a 13mm wrench, loosen and remove the main current line for the solenoid.

Open the end cap of the solenoid to examine the lead for corrosion.
Figure 12

Open the end cap of the solenoid to examine the lead for corrosion.

Disassemble the solenoid and examine the spring for corrosion.
Figure 13

Disassemble the solenoid and examine the spring for corrosion. All components should be free of corrosion. The brushes can be saved if there is only a mild show of corrosion. The thin layer of corrosion can be removed with a wire brush. Assembly is the reverse of disassembly.

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Page last updated: Fri 12/9/2016 02:25:35 AM