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Pelican Technical Article:

Oil Pump Replacement

Mike Holloway

Time:

8 hours8 hrs

Tab:

$250 to $1,000

Talent:

***

Tools:

10mm wrench, 10mm hex socket, 14mm Allen socket, 10 inch extension, universal swivel, floor jack, jack stands, wheel chocks, safety glasses, torque wrench

Applicable Models:

Mercedes-Benz R107 (1975-86)

Parts Required:

Oil pump Pelican Part #117-180-05-01-M604

Hot Tip:

Change oil, oil filter, and timing chain replacement.'Make sure you clean the Allen bolts very well prior to removal.

Performance Gain:

Longer life of your engine

Complementary Modification:

Change the oil and filter

Proper oil pressure is crucial to your engines life. Your oil is the lifeblood of the engine and must be maintained at proper temperatures and pressures for the engine to function properly and last. The most important component of your engine's oiling system is the oil pump. The pump is located on the front of the engine and is driven by a chain and sprocket driven from the front of the crankshaft. The lower part of the pump sits in the bottom of the oil pan and picks up the oil that has re-circulated down into the pan. While there is a screen on the oil pick up, debris and contaminants can get into the pump and destroy it over time.

Changing your oil pump is possible without having to remove the engine, but it will take time and it will not be easy. In fact, this project may be the most difficult you take on. You may think twice before engaging in this project but if you already have the belts off and the front cover off, then you are in a good position to take on this challenge. You will have to remove the oil pan but due to the position of the front end it won't be able to remove the pan.

You will want to drain your oil and change the oil filter. Please refer to the article referring to changing your oil and filter. You will also have to remove the front engine plate that covers the timing chain. In order to remove the cover plate, the belts will have to be removed. Please refer to the articles referring to belt removal. Begin by safely lifting and supporting the vehicle. See the article on safely lifting and supporting your car.

Before you do any work on your car it is important that you wear safety glasses and work gloves. If you have to jack up your car, make sure to use jack stands and chock your wheels as well as applying the parking brake. Protect your eyes, hands and body from fluids, dust and debris while working on your vehicle. Never work on your vehicle if you feel the task is beyond your ability. Always disconnect the battery before working on your car.

Using a 10mm socket, remove the bolts that hold the front cover plate to the engine.
Figure 1

Using a 10mm socket, remove the bolts that hold the front cover plate to the engine. You will have to remove the belts for easy access. 

Using a 6mm hex wrench, you will have to remove several bolts holding the front cover.
Figure 2

Using a 6mm hex wrench, you will have to remove several bolts holding the front cover. After the bolts are removed, the cover will be loose but not free because there are bolts on the oil pan holding it in place as well. These bolts will have to be removed.

Using a 10mm wrench, remove the bolts under the front cover that are attached to the oil pan.
Figure 3

Using a 10mm wrench, remove the bolts under the front cover that are attached to the oil pan.

The oil pan is held on with several 10mm bolts.
Figure 4

The oil pan is held on with several 10mm bolts. These bolts are going to be covered in grime. It is best to remove as much of this grime as possible. 

In a few instances, you will have to use a universal swivel on the socket to remove the bolts.
Figure 5

In a few instances, you will have to use a universal swivel on the socket to remove the bolts.

It is best if you drain the oil.
Figure 6

It is best if you drain the oil. The oil plug is a 14mm hex plug. 

Using a 14mm hex on a universal joint, loosen the drain plug making sure you have a proper waste receptacle to catch the waste oil.
Figure 7

Using a 14mm hex on a universal joint, loosen the drain plug making sure you have a proper waste receptacle to catch the waste oil. 

The oil pan is also held in place with several 6mm Allen bolts.
Figure 8

The oil pan is also held in place with several 6mm Allen bolts. These can be difficult to get to. There will be grime that has found its way into the recess. Make sure you clean these out very well. The Allen wrench has to be able to fit completely into the recess or you run the risk of striping the sides. If that happens there will be a much larger job to remove the bolt. 

On the back of the oil pan there will be a 10mm bolt just behind a plate.
Figure 9

On the back of the oil pan there will be a 10mm bolt just behind a plate. The plate is somewhat flexible. This bolt is not easy to find. If you remove all the bolts you can see and the pan is still holding on, this bolt is the first reason. Behind the plate are the other two reasons. Using a 10mm socket and an extension, remove the bolt.

Behind that bolt is another 10mm bolt that has to be removed.
Figure 10

Behind that bolt is another 10mm bolt that has to be removed.

Using a 10mm wrench, remove the bolt.
Figure 11

Using a 10mm wrench, remove the bolt.

Once the pan is loosened and the front cover is loose, the oil pump can be accessed.
Figure 12

Once the pan is loosened and the front cover is loose, the oil pump can be accessed. There are three 10mm bolts holding the pump in place. 

The front cover will be free and can be pulled off.
Figure 13

The front cover will be free and can be pulled off. Once this happens the pump can be lifted out of the oil pan. The oil pan will not be able to be removed without either taking off the front end or lifting out the engine but it will be able to drop low enough to allow the pump to be removed. 

There will be a screen and shroud in the oil pan from the pump.
Figure 14

There will be a screen and shroud in the oil pan from the pump.

I found this at the bottom of my pan.
Figure 15

I found this at the bottom of my pan. Looks like the cowl that held the screen in place broke. I am not sure how this happened but it's a good thing it was caught. The screen was free at the bottom of the pan not doing its job.

Replacing the oil pump is a very difficult job if you decide not to pull the engine or the front end. Of all the jobs to do on your car, this one is by far the most challenging. Installation is the reversal of removal. 


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Page last updated: Fri 12/9/2016 02:54:41 AM