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Pelican Technical Article:

Changing Automatic Transmission Fluid

Mike Holloway

Tools:

20mm socket, 22mm socket, Phillips head screwdriver, Pump action oil can Pelican Part # ATF-1004-5-MB-M1220, Transmission Filter Kit with Seal Pelican Part # 109-270-02-98-MBZ, floor jack, jack stands, wheel chocks, safety glasses, torque wrench

Applicable Models:

Mercedes-Benz R107 (1972-89)

Parts Required:

5 quarts of Dexron II ATF, Pelican Part #001-989-21-03-10-M853

Hot Tip:

Don't remove the banjo fitting completely until pan is empty

Performance Gain:

Extended transmission life, smoother shifting

Complementary Modification:

Replace the kick down solenoid switch

The fluid in your automatic transmission is one of the most highly engineered fluids ever developed. Not only is it designed to protect against wear and heat, it also has to be balanced according to a specific frictional requirement in order to allow the automatic clutch to be able to work and not be too slippery yet still allow metal surfaces to slide with minimal restriction. The ATF has to do several things such as transfer power in the torque converter, provide hydraulic pressure to operate the clutches and shift gears, lubricate bearings, gears and bushings, cool the transmission, and provide the right friction profile for proper operation of the plate, band and torque convertor clutches. It truly is a very balanced fluid for a very sophisticated component: the automatic transmission. The automatic transmission is very sensitive with many small parts that can be easily compromised. If the fluid is kept clean, the life of your transmission will be extended dramatically. Unfortunately, the fluid can become compromised. A simple solution to extending the life of your transmission is to make sure the oil is clean and contaminate free. The automatic transmission fluid should be changed at least every 30,000 miles.

Before you do any work on your car it is important that you wear safety glasses and work gloves. If you have to jack up your car, make sure to use jack stands and chock your wheels as well as applying the parking brake. Protect your eyes, hands and body from fluids, dust and debris while working on your vehicle. Never work on your vehicle if you feel the task is beyond your ability. Always disconnect the battery before working on your car.

The automatic transmission does not have a drain plug like the engine.
Figure 1

The automatic transmission does not have a drain plug like the engine. You must remove a bolt connecting the dipstick tube fitting also known as the filler pipe banjo fitting and the bolts that secure the shallow pan that covers the bottom of the transmission.

Locate the converter drain plug by manually turning the engine over.
Figure 2

Locate the converter drain plug by manually turning the engine over. You can do this by turning the engine with a 22mm socket on the nut that holds the vibration dampener. Make sure you turn the engine in the running direction. The plug is usually a 5mm hex socket head screw, so you will need a metric hex driver to remove it. It is easier if you have someone help by turning the crank slowly until you can spot the drain on the torque convertor.

Make sure you place a used oil receptacle to catch the used oil.
Figure 3

Make sure you place a used oil receptacle to catch the used oil. Using a 20mm Socket, loosen but do not remove the banjo fitting. Allow the fluid to pour out.

 4; Using a 5mm Allen wrench, loosen the drain plug for the torque convertor.
Figure 4

4; Using a 5mm Allen wrench, loosen the drain plug for the torque convertor. There is approximately three quarts of oil within the torque convertor.

After all the fluid has left the drain pan, remove the banjo fitting screw from the transmission.
Figure 5

After all the fluid has left the drain pan, remove the banjo fitting screw from the transmission.

Using a 10mm socket, loosen the four bolts and drop one corner of the pan to drop down first so the fluid will run out in a small stream.
Figure 6

Using a 10mm socket, loosen the four bolts and drop one corner of the pan to drop down first so the fluid will run out in a small stream.

Carefully dump out the rest of the fluid by lowering one of the corners to allow for fluid to pour into the waste oil receptacle.
Figure 7

Carefully dump out the rest of the fluid by lowering one of the corners to allow for fluid to pour into the waste oil receptacle.

After the fluid stops pouring, remove the bolts.
Figure 8

After the fluid stops pouring, remove the bolts. This will free the pan.

Take some time and look closely at the oil pan.
Figure 9

Take some time and look closely at the oil pan. You may see clutch material or contaminates. Notice here that there seems to be some contaminants present.

It is always a good idea to replace the gasket.
Figure 10

It is always a good idea to replace the gasket.

Using a Phillips head screwdriver, remove the screws that are holding the ATF filter.
Figure 11

Using a Phillips head screwdriver, remove the screws that are holding the ATF filter. Be careful not to let the screws drop into the waste oil receptacle. 

There is a metal sleeve that can easily drop into where you have your waste oil.
Figure 12

There is a metal sleeve that can easily drop into where you have your waste oil. I used a couple rare earth magnets on a screwdriver to fish it out. 

Once the two screws have been removed, the filter can be replaced.
Figure 13

Once the two screws have been removed, the filter can be replaced.
Assembly is the reversal of removal. 

In order to add fluid, you will have to remove the dipstick level indicator.
Figure 14

In order to add fluid, you will have to remove the dipstick level indicator.

An easy way to put fluid back into your transmission is by using a pump action oil can.
Figure 15

An easy way to put fluid back into your transmission is by using a pump action oil can. The pump fluid filler is used to fill transmissions, differentials and transfer cases for Mercedes Benz vehicles with a 722.9 automatic transmission, using a 12 X 1.5 mm adapter. The hand pump dispenses efficiently.

The dipstick tube is a great place (and only place) to add ATF.
Figure 16

The dipstick tube is a great place (and only place) to add ATF. Add four quarts of new transmission fluid in order to get the fluid into the torque converter and cooler. Turn the engine on and allow it to run after the oil has been warmed up. After several minutes, add about 2 quarts. Keep in mind that it will take more fluid than mentioned in the owner's manual to fill it since you drained the torque converter and the cooler.


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Page last updated: Fri 12/2/2016 02:53:52 AM