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Alternator Inspection and Component Replacement
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

Alternator Inspection and Component Replacement

Mike Holloway

Time:

1 hour1 hr

Tab:

$1 to $300

Talent:

**

Tools:

22mm socket wrench with breaker bar, flat face screwdriver, Philips head screwdriver

Applicable Models:

Mercedes-Benz R107 (1972-89)

Parts Required:

Alternator

Hot Tip:

Penetrating release spray

Performance Gain:

Increased battery life, fewer electrical issues

Complementary Modification:

Rebuild wires

Alternators are used to charge the battery as well as power the electrical devices while the car is running. It does so by developing current in the copper windings. The rotor within the alternator carries the field. The brushes which are also made of copper carry a small current and are susceptible to corrosion. Once corrosion occurs there is a reduction in electrical conductivity resulting in reduced current supplying the battery and other electrical components. If your battery is experiencing a shortened life it may be an indication that the alternator needs to be rebuilt or replaced.

Rebuilding the alternator requires disassembly after removal. If you decide to rebuild the alternator, the parts most frequently replaced are the brushes and bearings. Check for availability prior to disassembly.

After the alternator has been removed (see Alternator Replacement for removal instructions), remove the ignition suppression component from the rear of the alternator.
Figure 1

After the alternator has been removed (see Alternator Replacement for removal instructions), remove the ignition suppression component from the rear of the alternator.

With a Phillips head screwdriver, loosen the screws on the back of the alternator which hold the brushes in place.
Figure 2

With a Phillips head screwdriver, loosen the screws on the back of the alternator which hold the brushes in place. The brushes are actually solid copper leads and are susceptible to corrosion.

remove the brushes and inspect for corrosion.
Figure 3

Remove the brushes and inspect for corrosion. If you notice corrosion, it can be removed with a wire brush or if the brushes appear to have lost significant mass they can be replaced.

Using a 22mm socket and a breaker bar, remove the pulley retaining ring nut.
Figure 4

Using a 22mm socket and a breaker bar, remove the pulley retaining ring nut. The nut will be tight, as it is held in place with a lock washer, so the use of a breaker bar on the socket may be required.

Using a flat face screwdriver, remove the 4 screws that hold the drive end cover.
Figure 5

Using a flat face screwdriver, remove the 4 screws that hold the drive end cover.

Using a flat face screwdriver, remove the 4 screws that hold the bearing retainer.
Figure 6

Using a flat face screwdriver, remove the 4 screws that hold the bearing retainer.

Remove the drive end cover.
Figure 7

Remove the drive end cover.

Inspect the rotor for corrosion which will lead to reduced current discharge.
Figure 8

Inspect the rotor for corrosion which will lead to reduced current discharge. Spin the bearing and listen and feel for signs of grinding. The bearing can fail if debris becomes lodged between the rolling elements and the outer or inner race.

Inspect the Stator for signs of corrosion which will lead to reduced current discharge.
Figure 9

Inspect the Stator for signs of corrosion which will lead to reduced current discharge.

With a Philips head screwdriver, unscrew the diode carrier.
Figure 10

With a Philips head screwdriver, unscrew the diode carrier.

Lift off the back and inspect the leads and bearing for corrosion or debris.
Figure 11

Lift off the back and inspect the leads and bearing for corrosion or debris.

Inspect the back rotor bearing and listen and feel for signs of grinding.
Figure 12

Inspect the back rotor bearing and listen and feel for signs of grinding. The bearing can fail if debris becomes lodged between the rolling elements and the outer or inner race. Any one of these components can contribute to failure. Assembly is the reverse steps of disassembly.

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Page last updated: Mon 12/5/2016 02:24:53 AM