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Pelican Technical Article:

Water Pump Replacement

Time:

7 hours7 hrs

Tab:

$200

Tools:

Set of Allen head sockets, wrenches, screwdrivers

Applicable Models:

Mercedes-Benz E320 (1996-97)

Parts Required:

Water pump, hoses

Hot Tip:

Take your time. This one is a bit daunting

Performance Gain:

Car will cool down again

Complementary Modification:

Change serpentine belt, radiator hoses.

When a water pump begins to fail, you'll notice that the car tends to overheat at low engine speed, such as sitting at a stoplight. When you accelerate, the engine temperature will drop. Now, this is not always indicative of a water pump, but a good starting point. You may also want to try squeezing the top radiator hose with the engine warmed up and running. You should feel pressure build up on the back of the hose and surge once it is released. If you feel no pressure, it's a fair bet that the water pump is failing. Sometimes, you can also see a slight drip coming from the water pump housing itself. These weep holes are cast into the pump housing and allow excess coolant to drain out if it has leaked past the various seals in the pump.

In this article, I'll go over the steps involved with changing out the water pump on the Mercedes Benz M104 engine. This job is a bit difficult, with many steps and a few things that are easy to overlook. I've tried to compile as much of it as I can here so that you won't be making any mistakes in the process.

Begin by removing the splash shield by first removing the four 8mm bolts along the front edge (green arrows).
Figure 1

Begin by removing the splash shield by first removing the four 8mm bolts along the front edge (green arrows).

Next remove the six 8mm bolts on the front of each wheel well (green arrows) NOTE: Passenger side wheel well shown here, the driver's side is similar.
Figure 2

Next remove the six 8mm bolts on the front of each wheel well (green arrows) NOTE: Passenger side wheel well shown here, the driver's side is similar. Once all the bolts are removed, carefully lower and remove the front splash shield.

Next locate the red drain plug on the front driver's side of the engine (green arrow).
Figure 3

Next locate the red drain plug on the front driver's side of the engine (green arrow). This is the drain plug for the radiator. Place a large drain pan of at least 5 gallons capacity underneath. It also helps to loosen and remove the cap on the coolant expansion tank.

Loosen and remove the radiator drain plug and allow all the coolant to drain from both the radiator and the engine.
Figure 4

Loosen and remove the radiator drain plug and allow all the coolant to drain from both the radiator and the engine. It may take a while before all the coolant has drained from the engine. Also remove the airbox from the left side of the engine bay.

Now crawl under the front of the car and locate the bottom hose connections on the right (passenger) side of the car.
Figure 5

Now crawl under the front of the car and locate the bottom hose connections on the right (passenger) side of the car. You'll see a metal hose connection and also a rubber hose. The rubber hose connects to the radiator from the coolant expansion tank (green arrow). The metal connection (purple arrow) is the connection going to the transmission fluid cooler built into the radiator. Use a 19mm wrench to loosen and remove this fitting. Keep in mind that you will have some transmission fluid drain out so use a drain pan underneath. Once removed, loosen the hose clamp holding the rubber hose to the flange on the radiator and remove the hose.

Now look towards the center of the radiator.
Figure 6

Now look towards the center of the radiator. You'll see the other connection for the transmission fluid cooler (green arrow). Like before, use a 19mm open end wrench to loosen and remove the fitting. You may also want to hold the other side of the fitting with another 19mm wrench to prevent any twisting of the line.

Now climb out from under the car and remove the two plastic pins holding the outer fan grille in place (green arrows).
Figure 7

Now climb out from under the car and remove the two plastic pins holding the outer fan grille in place (green arrows). Use a screwdriver to pry them up and out of the radiator support panel. Pull the plastic outer fan grille out and set it aside.

Now locate the five 10mm bolts holding the upper portion of the radiator support frame to the car (green arrows).
Figure 8

Now locate the five 10mm bolts holding the upper portion of the radiator support frame to the car (green arrows). Also pry out the two large spring clips holding the radiator frame to the support panel (purple arrows).

Lift the upper radiator support frame up and turn it over.
Figure 9

Lift the upper radiator support frame up and turn it over. On the inside, you'll see the two plastic clips that hold the hood release cable to the panel (green arrows). Pop the cable out and set the upper frame aside.

Remove the two 10mm bolts holding the top of the fan assembly to the A/C condenser (green arrows).
Figure 10

Remove the two 10mm bolts holding the top of the fan assembly to the A/C condenser (green arrows).

Remove the 13mm bolt holding the horn to the bracket (green arrow) and un-plug the electrical connections.
Figure 11

Remove the 13mm bolt holding the horn to the bracket (green arrow) and un-plug the electrical connections.

Pry the plastic cover off the fan shroud at the upper right corner of the fan assembly.
Figure 13

Pry the plastic cover off the fan shroud at the upper right corner of the fan assembly. Underneath you will see both the service port for the air conditioning and the electrical connection for the fan motor (green arrow). Squeeze the connector to release it from the fan assembly. Now lift the whole fan assembly out of the front of the car.

Remove the two 10mm bolts holding the A/C condenser to the radiator (green arrows).
Figure 14

Remove the two 10mm bolts holding the A/C condenser to the radiator (green arrows). Also remove the two smaller metal clips that hold the top of the radiator fan shrouds to the radiator frame (purple arrows).

Now loosen and remove the hose clamp holding the upper radiator hose to the radiator at the top right (driver's side) of the radiator.
Figure 15

Now loosen and remove the hose clamp holding the upper radiator hose to the radiator at the top right (driver's side) of the radiator.

Remove the hose clamp holding the lower radiator hose to the engine on the drivers side (green arrow).
Figure 16

Remove the hose clamp holding the lower radiator hose to the engine on the drivers side (green arrow).

Now carefully remove the fan shroud from the inside of the radiator.
Figure 17

Now carefully remove the fan shroud from the inside of the radiator. Take your time as it is a bit tricky to get it up and over the fan blades. Once the fan shroud is removed, carefully lift the radiator up and out of the front of the car.

Now separate the black plastic frame from the A/C condenser.
Figure 18

Now separate the black plastic frame from the A/C condenser. You should be able to carefully lower the condenser out from under the car and off to one side. This makes the various components inside the engine bay much easier to access.

Remove the three 5mm Allen head screws holding the fan to the fan clutch assembly.
Figure 19

Remove the three 5mm Allen head screws holding the fan to the fan clutch assembly.

Remove the fan belt by placing a 15mm socket on the belt tensioner and turning it clockwise (green arrow).
Figure 20

Remove the fan belt by placing a 15mm socket on the belt tensioner and turning it clockwise (green arrow). This will slacken the belt and allow you to pull it off all the pulleys.

Now remove the pulley from the water pump.
Figure 21

Now remove the pulley from the water pump. Use a strap wrench as shown here to keep the pulley from turning as you remove the three 13mm bolts holding it in place.

Loosen and remove the two hose clamps holding the water hose going from the water pump to the engine block.
Figure 22

Loosen and remove the two hose clamps holding the water hose going from the water pump to the engine block. Then remove the hose.

Now remove the hose clamp holding the lower radiator hose to the water pump and remove the hose (green arrow).
Figure 23

Now remove the hose clamp holding the lower radiator hose to the water pump and remove the hose (green arrow). Next remove both the 10mm nut (red arrow) and the 5mm Allen head screw (purple arrow, screw obscured by coolant line) and pull the metal coolant line out of the water pump. You may find it difficult to remove the Allen head screw. Usually, the best idea is to have a set of Allen head sockets and also a long extension. If the bolt seems stuck in place, a handy trick is to center the driver in the bolt, then give the extension a good whack with a hammer. This can sometimes free the bolt up. The last thing you want to do here is strip out the inside of the bolt.

On the top of the old water pump, remove the smaller water hose going to the expansion tank (green arrow).
Figure 24

On the top of the old water pump, remove the smaller water hose going to the expansion tank (green arrow). Also remove the large radiator hose going to the top connection of the radiator (red arrow). Also remove the electrical connection going to the temperature sensor (purple arrow).

Use a deep 19mm socket to remove the temperature sensor from the water pump as shown here and set the sensor aside.
Figure 25

Use a deep 19mm socket to remove the temperature sensor from the water pump as shown here and set the sensor aside. We will be re-using it in the new water pump. Also remove the three 10mm bolts holding the thermostat cover to the water pump (green arrows). Pull the thermostat cover off and remove the thermostat from the water pump.

Next remove the 10mm nut holding the electrical connector to the pump at the rear as shown here.
Figure 26

Next remove the 10mm nut holding the electrical connector to the pump at the rear as shown here.

Remove the two long 10mm nuts and bolts that hold the power steering fluid reservoir to the engine and set it aside as shown here.
Figure 27

Remove the two long 10mm nuts and bolts that hold the power steering fluid reservoir to the engine and set it aside as shown here. This will give you access to the two lower 6mm bolts holding the pump on (green arrow). Also, use a regular 6mm Allen wrench to remove the top bolt (purple arrow).

And now the toughest part of the job: removing the top inboard 6mm Allen head bolt that holds the water pump to the block.
Figure 28

And now the toughest part of the job: removing the top inboard 6mm Allen head bolt that holds the water pump to the block. Unfortunately this is one of those things that is nearly impossible to take a picture of. In this picture you can just see the bolt (green arrow). With the limited access you have to remove all of these bolts, it's very easy to strip out the inside of the bolt (our project car had a couple of the bolts already stripped out). If so inclined, you can replace the bolts with regular galvanized bolts.

And finally the pump is off.
Figure 29

And finally the pump is off. If you've made it this far, congratulations. At this point, you'll want to clean up any coolant that may have spilled onto the engine block and also clean the mating surface of the new pump to the block. This picture also shows the locations for the mounting bolts more clearly (green arrows).

The new water pump will come with three O-rings.
Figure 30

The new water pump will come with three O-rings. Fit the new O-ring to the back of the new water pump as shown here.

Now fit the new water pump to the engine as shown here using new fasteners.
Figure 31

Now fit the new water pump to the engine as shown here using new fasteners. On some water pumps, there is an extra threaded hole cast into the housing to run an additional sensor or fitting. In our case, you'll need to block off the additional hole with the supplied bolt and washer shown here (green arrow).

Cut the old O-ring off the metal coolant pipe and fit the new O-ring (supplied with the pump) over the flange.
Figure 32

Cut the old O-ring off the metal coolant pipe and fit the new O-ring (supplied with the pump) over the flange.

Fit the metal coolant pipe to the new water pump and tighten down the 10mm nut that holds it in place (green arrow).
Figure 33

Fit the metal coolant pipe to the new water pump and tighten down the 10mm nut that holds it in place (green arrow). Also tighten down the 5mm Allen head bolt that holds the pipe to the front of the engine timing case cover. Also re-attach the power steering pump and reservoir back on the mounting bracket.

Place the water pump pulley on the flange of the new water pump, secure it with a strap wrench and re-fit the three 13mm bolts holding it in place.
Figure 34

Place the water pump pulley on the flange of the new water pump, secure it with a strap wrench and re-fit the three 13mm bolts holding it in place. Tighten them down to around 18 ft/lbs. each

Fit the larger new O-ring over the lip of the thermostat and then place the thermostat in the housing as shown.
Figure 35

Fit the larger new O-ring over the lip of the thermostat and then place the thermostat in the housing as shown.

Fit the thermostat cover on the top of the water pump and re-install the three 10mm bolts (green arrows).
Figure 36

Fit the thermostat cover on the top of the water pump and re-install the three 10mm bolts (green arrows). Keep in mind that the rearmost bolt also holds the bracket for the electrical connection to the temperature sensor.

Thread the temperature sensor into the new water pump, tighten it down and re-connect the electrical connection (green arrow).
Figure 37

Thread the temperature sensor into the new water pump, tighten it down and re-connect the electrical connection (green arrow).

Install the water hose going from the water pump to the engine block (green arrow) as well as the smaller hose going to the coolant overflow tank (purple arrow).
Figure 38

Install the water hose going from the water pump to the engine block (green arrow) as well as the smaller hose going to the coolant overflow tank (purple arrow).

Install the lower radiator hose going from the bottom water pump fitting to the radiator (green arrow).
Figure 39

Install the lower radiator hose going from the bottom water pump fitting to the radiator (green arrow).

Install the upper radiator hose going from the top water pump fitting to the radiator (green arrow).
Figure 40

Install the upper radiator hose going from the top water pump fitting to the radiator (green arrow).

Reinstall either the old or use a new serpentine belt.
Figure 41

Reinstall either the old or use a new serpentine belt. Rotate the 15mm bolt on the belt tensioner (green arrow) clockwise to allow enough room to slip the belt over all the pullies in the orientation shown here.

Now place the plastic fan over the fan clutch and re-install the three 5mm screws that hold it in place (green arrows).
Figure 42

Now place the plastic fan over the fan clutch and re-install the three 5mm screws that hold it in place (green arrows).

You're now ready to reinstall the A/C condenser back into the engine compartment.
Figure 43

You're now ready to reinstall the A/C condenser back into the engine compartment. Carefully lift the condenser into place in front of the motor. Fit the plastic air duct over the front of the condenser. Once in position, place the radiator back into the engine bay. Here's where it gets a little tricky. At the bottom of the condenser, radiator and air duct are two plastic pins that fit into slots molded into the rubber mounts that sit on the radiator frame. This picture shows the bottom of the mounts with the radiator, condenser and duct installed. The pins for the radiator fit into the slots of the feet illustrated by the green arrow. The pins for the condenser fit into the slot illustrated by the purple arrow, while the duct pins fit into the slot illustrated by the yellow arrow. It's a bit confusing and takes some time to get everything lined up.

Now reconnect the 19mm fitting going to the transmission fluid cooler in the radiator on the left side (purple arrow) and also the hose going to the coolant expansion tank (green arrow).
Figure 44

Now reconnect the 19mm fitting going to the transmission fluid cooler in the radiator on the left side (purple arrow) and also the hose going to the coolant expansion tank (green arrow).

Also reconnect the other transmission cooler fitting in the center of the radiator (green arrow).
Figure 45

Also reconnect the other transmission cooler fitting in the center of the radiator (green arrow).

Reconnect the upper radiator hose.
Figure 46

Reconnect the upper radiator hose.

Reconnect the lower radiator hose (green arrow).
Figure 47

Reconnect the lower radiator hose (green arrow).

Slide the fan shroud back into place, taking the time to make sure that all the guide pins are in place.
Figure 48

Slide the fan shroud back into place, taking the time to make sure that all the guide pins are in place.

Reconnect the two 10mm bolts holding the A/C condenser to the radiator (green arrows) along with the two small spring clips that hold the fan shroud to the radiator (purple arrows).
Figure 49

Reconnect the two 10mm bolts holding the A/C condenser to the radiator (green arrows) along with the two small spring clips that hold the fan shroud to the radiator (purple arrows).

Place the auxiliary cooling fan assembly back in front of the radiator and reconnect the connection for the fans (green arrow).
Figure 50

Place the auxiliary cooling fan assembly back in front of the radiator and reconnect the connection for the fans (green arrow).

Re-install the horn bracket and secure the 10mm nut holding it in place (green arrow, nut is under steering fluid lines).
Figure 51

Re-install the horn bracket and secure the 10mm nut holding it in place (green arrow, nut is under steering fluid lines). Also reinstall the 13mm bolt holding the horn to the bracket (purple arrow) and the two clamps holding the power steering fluid lines to the body (yellow arrow, one clamp shown).

Refit the airbox assembly and also the two 10mm bolts holding the auxiliary cooling fan assembly to the A/C condenser (green arrows).
Figure 52

Refit the airbox assembly and also the two 10mm bolts holding the auxiliary cooling fan assembly to the A/C condenser (green arrows).

Reinstall the hood release cable into the clips on the underside of the upper radiator support panel (green arrows).
Figure 53

Reinstall the hood release cable into the clips on the underside of the upper radiator support panel (green arrows).

Now install the upper radiator support panel and install the five 10mm bolts holding it in place (green arrows) as well as the two large spring clips holding the radiator to the panel (purple arrows).
Figure 54

Now install the upper radiator support panel and install the five 10mm bolts holding it in place (green arrows) as well as the two large spring clips holding the radiator to the panel (purple arrows). Remember to refill coolant and bleed cooling system.

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Comments and Suggestions:
paige320 Comments: Will these instructions work for a water pump replacement on a '98 W210 e320?
November 29, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Applicable Models:

Mercedes-Benz E320 (1996-97) - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Richard T Comments: I assume this is the same for my E320 1998 Wagon radiator removal. Just stop at that point and replace.

September 14, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Yes, exactly. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
hussain Comments: what is the attachment to the underside of intake manifold in e320 96 or 97 model of mercedes m104 engines. this attachment is connected to throttle body boot. what is its function.
September 10, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Can you share a photo? Possible you are referring to the variable intake control. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
hussain Comments: could u route the water pump inlet hose, that is coming from middle of the radiator I feel like with arrangement we are only using half of the radiator cooling capacity and instead connect it to the bottom out let of radiator. I am staying in Arabian gulf and the temperature is very hot so the engine always feel very very hot.
August 8, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I don't believe so. The system was designed to run the way it is. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Doug Comments: OMG I hve removed my WP three times in course of head gasket repair and never removed half these components..the radiator and so on is all not needed..Makes it easier perhaps..but the bolts are all four 5mm allen head that go into the engine block and are reached from very close to the water pump..You could pull the single engine cooling fan if needed, serpentine belt, of course..but why take all this apart?? Just pull off the wires and remove the thermostat for reuse..the temp sensors and take out the four allen bolts..And hose the coolant off the floor when it comes out! There is ONE '0' ring seal..I ordered one from Pelican and they cant seem to provide the correct size..Had to cut two and cement them in place to improvise a seal at the block mating surface..all others are hose clamp attachments..Except the thermostat and its seal..
June 29, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: That is the way the author does the repair. Thanks for the additional info and feedback. We appreciate it.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Jan Comments: There is no Gasket, between water pump and engine, or water pump and thermostat? With these 3 O-rings is enough?
March 22, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: it is sealed by the O-rings. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Jaalmodo Comments: Hi. Great article. I plan on replacing radiator on my 1999s320 with 175k miles. Do you recommend replacing water pump. It's original. No leaks or overheating problems now. Just leaking radiator.
March 18, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Original, yes. It is about at the age of failing. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
MBFan Comments: Thank you for this detailed job aid. My question is after you replace the water pump, what are the remaining steps - adding coolant, where to add coolant etc.
January 22, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Follow assembly steps, or reverse removal steps. FIll and bleed cooling system. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Icarus Comments: Do you have the process for the V8?
October 12, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I don’t have that info.

I would grab a repair manual. It will have the procedure, special tools and torque specs.

Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
bs Comments: Gentlemen,
Whew! This is one of the clearest and most comprehensive pieces I have come across since I re-did the hubs on my deuce [using directions on Steel Soldiers]. Nicely done!

I found you guys while trying to get useful photos of my '95 C280 W202 M104 inline 6. Overheating issues are not solved by thermostat change; guessing fan clutch; hoping it's not the water pump. If it's the pump, are these instructions sufficiently close to enable me to use 'em, or need I seek elsewhere.

Seems to me that If I replace the pump, it's make a great deal of sense to replace the belt and perhaps tensioner at the same time, no?

Best,
bs
May 24, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I agree, while in there replace the belt and tensioner. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
sil Comments: Hi Nick, I noticed the coolant being removed is ORANGE in color. Is this the MB required color or is it the Greenish type? Thanks in advance.
April 22, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: What vehicle? Most MB coolant is blue (could be seen as greenish). - Nick at Pelican Parts  
bunny Comments: For my 96 SL320: From your "Mechanical cooling fan removal for SL320" use steps 1,2,4,5,6,7. Then from this procedure use steps 3,4,15,16,19-23,25-42, 46-48. Re-fill coolant.
April 4, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the additional info and feedback. We appreciate it.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
MB BOB Comments: Is the 1999 E300, T/D, Water pump replacement procedure close enough to this one or do you have any special tips?? I have ordered the parts from you. The W/P housing failed, how could this happen?? Thanks
January 6, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: The housing can fail if the impeller makes contact due to a bad bearing. I don't think this article will help, as it is a gas engine.
We don't currently have that tech article. If we get a chance to perform the procedure, we will be sure to document it.

I would grab a repair manual. It will have the procedure, special tools and torque specs.

Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799.- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Bru Comments: Would this procedure be the same for a 93 300e?
November 25, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: This tech article applies to:
W210 E320 (1996-97) - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Peter Comments: I there a tutorial for removing a water pump in a 1992 300 sl I need help and step by step instructions would be helpful Thanks
June 19, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I don't think we currently have a tech article for your vehicle. Out W129 articles are located here: http://www.pelicanparts.com/techarticles/MBZ_Tech_Index-W129-R129.htm - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Shipking46 Comments: Thank you for your help.......I completely put the entire front end back together and then started the car. Belt, pulleys, new water pump....all good BUT bad leak on the backside of the radiator at the top......steel line, like a brake line with a hole through the bolt, I took it back apart and tightened it back up and still leaking bad. I think I am missing either a washer or another fitting on the radiator back side. I did have one copper washer but I may have dropped something when I first took it apart.
June 9, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I would replace the washer you mentioned. Also double check there aren't any other missing seals. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Shipking46 Comments: Nick, thank you for replying back. Changing the seals, evacuating the system and vacuuming it free of moisture. Is this something I can do or not and do you have any idea how much something like this would cost for the 97 c280? Thanks. Steve....
May 29, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: You will need an A/C service machine. A repair shop with an A/C machine can do it. I a not sure of cost, you'll have to call around. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Shipking46 Comments: I have a 1997 C280......I have been using these steps and have had no problems thus far back to the old water pump, however I did accidently disconnect the AC lines and all the refrigerant came out. I know I will have to recharge the system but what else will need to be done. Thanks.
May 27, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I would replace the seals on the lines and evacuate it and pull the system into a vacuum to remove any moisture. Then recharge. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
beachboy Comments: Hi Guys,
Does this apply to my december 1994 sl320 straight six
reg; g5 osl ? just checking
May 8, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: No, only applies to:
W210 E320 (1996-97) - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Chuck Comments: Hi thank you for all info .But what happen to me is after I put the new pump in.And after I done everything and put antifreeze in .I still had a leak.i am not even start the engine yet.I do not know that I need to put any thing with the o ring or not?Do I need to torque them or not?I had redo it three times already I still had a leak.Would you please help me find the problem of these .thank you very much.
January 27, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: The O-ring should be installed lightly lubricated with clean engine coolant. I would suggest evenly torquing the bolts. If there is a leak, I would pinpoint it to be sure it is from your work and not a separate problem. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
ULYSSES Comments: HEY GUYS LIKE I SAID WITH YOU THE JOB IS NOW DONE. GLAD YOU ARE HERE AND WILL BE LOOKING FORWARD TO ANOTHER PROJECT WITH YOU. TOOK ONLY HOURS TO PUT IT BACK AFTER INSTALLLING THE PARTS. WITH YOUR INFO IT WAS A BREEZE, THANKS GUYS, LOVE YA!
December 13, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the feedback. Glad we could help.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
ULYSSES Comments: THANKS. THIS WAS THE ONLY WATER PUMP REMOVAL INFO FOR 1996 S320 WITH RELIABLE INFO. I LOOKED AND LOOKED AND FINALLY FOUND YOU. NOW I CAN CHANGE MY LEAKING WATER PUMP. U R THE BEST.
December 3, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the feedback. Glad we could help. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Adrian Comments: Great article! I wouldn't attempt the project without it.
Some important observations:
Nearly a quart of ATF drained from the oil cooler and piping before my son noticed the drip. I temporarily plugged the pipe. Remember to have some replacement ATF handy should you encounter this issue.
My replacement pump not from Pelican was missing two 14mm plugs even though I provided my VIN. Spent a whole day looking and found only so so temp solution. Had I known they were missing, I would put the replacements on with the pump off the vehicle. Bottom line you have all the plugs, covers and orings before starting the project or at least before putting the pump on.
Thankfully I didn't have any issues with the 4 bolts holding the pump, but I can confirm Figure 23, those were the toughest allen screws for me to remove. both of mine were allen, one of them stripped. Tough access. I got better leverage with a number 30 star bit socket.
November 22, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the feedback. We are constantly adding and improving our technical content. - Kerry at Pelican Parts  
Bigruu Comments: Great article and guide for water pump replacement. The detail and photos shown are extremely important, even for a good mechanic. Kudos to you guys, really appreciate the effort.
April 16, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thank you for the kind words.
Glad it helped you.
whunter@pelicanparts.com
 

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