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Mercedes Benz Head Gasket Replacement
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

Mercedes Benz Head Gasket Replacement

Steve Vernon

Time:

14 hours14 hrs

Tab:

$140

Talent:

*****

Tools:

Mercedes-Benz tool #103-0040, 12mm 12 point 1/2 inch drive, 140mm long, 12mm triple square cylinder head socket, Mercedes-Benz slide hammer (impact extractor), 12mm, 17mm Hex, all your other tools

Applicable Models:

Mercedes-Benz 190E (1987-93)
Mercedes-Benz 260E (1987-89)
Mercedes-Benz 300CE (1988-92)
Mercedes-Benz 300D (1987)
Mercedes-Benz 300E (1986-93)
Mercedes-Benz 300TD (1987)
Mercedes-Benz 300TE (1988-93)
Mercedes-Benz E300 (1995)

Parts Required:

New head gasket set and head bolts

Hot Tip:

Get a friend and a hoist to help you lift the head

Performance Gain:

Longer engine life

Complementary Modification:

Flush your cooling system and replace your radiator hoses

There are several signs that you are in need of a new head gasket. The most common among them is the mixing of your oil and coolant. If you have had a water pump or thermostat fail, and your car overheated, there is a very good chance you are going to be looking at performing this job, as the extreme temperatures associated with an over heated engine can damage both the head and its gasket.

Replacing your head gasket might be the biggest job you will attempt on your car short of rebuilding the entire engine. It is not a quick or easy job, but can be done by a DIY mechanic if you take your time, have the right tools and follow the instructions. This job can take a few days for a novice, so make sure you have the car in a secure and weather safe area before you start. You are going to be opening up the engine and may even be sending the head out for repairs, so you don't want to be working outside when it starts to rain.

I can not stress this enough: get a cheap digital camera and take lots of pictures before and during this job, document wire and vacuum routing plus anything you feel unsure of, this can only help when it comes time to put everything back together.

There are several steps that need to be preformed on other parts of the car before you begin removing the cylinder head. We have covered all of these in separate articles so I am not going to include them here, as this will be a long enough project as it is. Please refer to all the prep work articles contained here on Pelican Parts. Before you begin any of them, disconnect the battery.

First, safely raise and support your vehicle. Drain the cooling system. Remove the fan and drive belt.

There are three ways you can remove the head: with the exhaust and intake on, with the exhaust off and with both the exhaust and intake off the head. We are going to take the head off with the exhaust disconnected and leave the intake system on. Note: in case you don't read ahead, after removing the head this way, we recommend you remove it with the exhaust system attached. It makes the head much more balanced and easier to work with. The head and intake/exhaust system is extremely heavy and at a very difficult angle to remove from the car. I highly recommend using an engine hoist to remove it from the car, you run a serious risk of hurting yourself and the car by trying to lift the head from the engine without some form of mechanical lift.

You will need to remove the air filter housing. Begin by removing the cold air inlet that runs from between the radiator into the housing. It is plastic and just pulls off. There are three 10mm nuts holding the housing to the engine, two by the valve cover and one on the side by the ABS unit. Remove the two by the valve cover and loosen the one by the ABS unit. Using pliers or vise grips remove the vacuum hose from the valve cover to the air cleaner. The housing can now be lifted from the metering unit. It can be a snug fit so you may have to wiggle it to remove it.

Now you need to remove the plugs, wires, distributor cover and cap, and the valve cover. If you are going to be reusing your wires it is a good idea to number which wire goes to which plug. This will help when you are re-assembling the engine. Remove the coolant overflow hose that goes across the valve cover and the one that connects the water pump to the head, along with any vacuum lines that are in your way. Insert a screwdriver into the cable guide for the wires and remove it from the valve cover. Once the wires are numbered remove them from the spark plugs. Grab the wires by the boot (not the cable) twist slightly and pull. With the wires removed, move to the front of the engine and using an Allen key remove the three bolts holding the distributor cover on. Follow the center wire from the distributor to the coil and remove it. Make sure you do not forget to reinstall the cover on the coil when putting everything back together.

If you have not yet removed the vacuum hose from the valve cover, you need to do that now. There are eight 10mm bolts holding the valve cover on, remove these. The cover is now free of the head but may stick a little. Do NOT hit it with a hammer or try and force a screwdriver between the cover and head. You will only damage the cover or cause a leaky seal. Be patient and rock the cover loose with your hands.

There are three small Hex bolts holding the distributor cap on, remove these and then the four bolts that hold the distributor housing to the cylinder head. The drive belt tensioner is attached to the housing, remove the bolts from the bracket leaving it attached to the tensioner and move it to the side.

Remove the heater line that runs across the front of the engine to the water pump.

Before you loosen the chain tensioner you need to mark the chain and sprocket. I like to use White-Out. While the manual recommends you mark the chain and sprocket by the guide pin, I like to mark it in another area as well. You are not going to be handling it a lot, but it is best to have a back up mark.

The next step is to loosen and remove the tensioner, on our car we needed to move the smog pump out of the way first. There are four bolts that hold it to the engine. Remove three of them and loosen the forth, this will allow you to pivot the pump out of the way without disconnecting everything attached to it. With the pump out of the way, use your 12 point to unscrew the tensioner plug and seal. Be careful as the spring behind it is under tension. Once they are removed, use your 17mm Hex and unscrew the threaded ring inside the tensioner housing.

You can now push back on the rail guide to assist in slipping the tensioner from the housing. The tensioner MUST be disassembled before reinstalling. Use a small long socket to push the pressure pin along with its detent spring from the housing. It must be pressed out pointy-end first. Clean all the parts thoroughly. Make sure when you are reinstalling it that you follow the torque specs carefully, the inner ring and outer screw are torqued to different values.

With the chain loose you can now remove the three hex bolts holding the sprocket to the cam and remove the sprocket. When slipping the chain off the sprocket take extra care to make sure you do not let the chain fall down into the engine. I like to wrap the chain in a rag, gently hold it in the open jaws of my vice grips and then use the weigh of the vice grips to hold the chain off to one side of the engine or if space is tight slip a screwdriver through the chain and hang it that way. Use your Mercedes-Benz tool and pull the guide pin from the driver side chain rail.

Move to the exhaust manifold and remove the twelve studs holding the manifold to the head. It is best to remove the entire stud from the head and not just the nut from the stud. You can do this by double nutting the stud and then walking the stud out of the head as one piece. This will give you more room to work when pulling the head from the engine.

There is a small smog pipe connected to the head between the two exhaust manifolds. Make sure you use a hex and remove this or it will cause you problems when you actual go to remove the head. If you are removing the head this way make sure you remove the EGR tube from the manifold.

Detach the automatic transmission tube from the rear passenger side of the head (if you have an automatic transmission car).

Remove the bracket holding the dipstick from the head. This is located in between the first and second intake runner. With the bracket loose you can pull the dipstick and tube up and out of the car.

The order that you remove the wiring harness and vacuum lines is not that important, as long as you take lots of pictures and label everything so you can figure out where it all goes during installation. With the exception of the crank positing sensor and the vacuum line at the ignition control unit, all of the connections disconnect from the engine. The crank positioning sensor along with the vacuum line disconnect from their control units mounted on the driver side inside fender. These need to be disconnected as they run through the intake system and will allow the head to be removed with them attached. With all of the electrical and vacuum lines disconnected from the engine, remove the three bolts holding the wiring harness guide to the engine and lift it out of the way.

Open the gas cap to release the pressure and separate the gas lines from the engine. There will be a little spillage so be prepared. Use two wrenches when separating the lines. Use one to hold the line where it enters the body, and the other to loosen the incoming line.

Detach the two Bowden cables from the throttle linkage. Pop the end of the ball joint off the one cable connecting it to the linkage using a screwdriver, and then press the plastic guide together and through the bracket. On the other cable, press the guide out of the fulcrum seat and with draw the cable through the lever, then press the plastic clip together and pass it through the rear bracket.

Disconnect the heater hose where it exits the cylinder head at the back driver side of the engine. While there make sure you have disconnected the four pronged plug directly above it and the wiring harness mount to the number six intake runner.

There are two intake manifold supports that need to be detached from the engine block. You will need to approach these from under the car as they are impossible to get at from the top of the engine.

With everything disconnected, you are ready to remove the head. There are fourteen head bolts holding the head to the block. These must be removed and installed in a specific order (please see diagrams). Failure to follow the specific order can result in damage to the head or at the very least, a leaky engine. Also, the bolts are stretch bolts and deform when torqued. While you can measure the bolts, and if they are within spec, reuse them; I always use new head bolts since it's just cheap insurance.

I highly recommend you purchase a 140mm long 12mm triple square for the head bolts. The bolts sit down in the valve train and it is very difficult to seat a standard triple square and extension. You do not want to strip one of the bolts or you will be a world of trouble trying to get it out. Using your 140mm triple square and a long breaker bar, remove the head bolts according to the pattern supplied. The head sits on two locating dowels so once it is loose it will not slip off.

Attach a chain to the bracket mounted on the back of the head and secure it to a point on the front. I secured the chain on two points on the front then joined them to help with the balance. Attach the chain to a hoist and safely remove the head from the engine.

If you have had any damage to the head, you should send it out for cleaning and inspection. The head on our project car was not giving us any problems so I just cleaned it up and reinstalled it with a new gasket.

For reinstallation purposes, I removed the exhaust manifold and attached it and the EGR tube to the head while it was on the bench. This made the unit much more in balance when installing. I wanted to try removing and installing it different ways so I could recommend which I found easier and in hindsight, I would definitely pull the head with the exhaust manifold attached next time.

Meticulously clean the head and the mounting surface on the block. Run a tap down each bolt hole on the engine deck, then tape a large straw into the end of a Shop Vac to suck out any liquid and trash. This cleans the threads and prevents hydraulic pressure from breaking the block or giving false bolt torque when installing the cylinder head. Sit the new gasket over the locating dowel pins and reinstall everything. Make sure you follow the bolt pattern for installation and torque to the specs on your engine. Mercedes-Benz usually will give an initial torque spec and then following the tightening pattern ask you to tighten all the bolts an additional 90 degrees twice. Note: for best results wait fifteen minutes between 90 degree torques. Make sure you double check your torque settings before starting.

The only really difference in installation is the chain tensioner. With everything clean you will first install the chain tensioner housing into the bore and then screw in the threaded ring and torque to your engine's torque value. Next, insert the pressure pin with its detent spring into the assembled chain tensioner housing. Install the compression spring and screw plug and torque down. Don't forget to reinstall the rail guide pin.

Once everything is reconnected and buttoned up, it is a good idea to change the oil and add fresh coolant.

Begin by removing the cold air inlet that runs from between the radiator into the housing.
Figure 1

Begin by removing the cold air inlet that runs from between the radiator into the housing. It is plastic and just pulls off.

There are three 10mm nuts holding the housing to the engine, two by the valve cover (green arrows) and one on the side by the ABS unit (insert lower right, red arrow).
Figure 2

There are three 10mm nuts holding the housing to the engine, two by the valve cover (green arrows) and one on the side by the ABS unit (insert lower right, red arrow). Remove the two by the valve cover and loosen the one by the ABS unit. Using pliers or vise grips remove the vacuum hose from the valve cover to the air cleaner (yellow arrow). The housing can now be lifted from the metering unit. It can be a snug fit so you may have to wiggle it to remove it.

If you are going to be reusing your wires it is a good idea to number which wire goes to which plug.
Figure 3

If you are going to be reusing your wires it is a good idea to number which wire goes to which plug. This will help when you are re-assembling the engine. Remove the coolant overflow hose that goes across the valve cover (red arrow).

Insert a screwdriver into the cable guide for the wires and remove it from the cover.
Figure 4

Insert a screwdriver into the cable guide for the wires and remove it from the cover. Once the wires are numbered remove them from the spark plugs. Grab the wires by the boot (not the cable) twist slightly and pull.

Using an Allen key remove the three bolts holding the distributor cover on (yellow arrow).
Figure 5

Using an Allen key remove the three bolts holding the distributor cover on (yellow arrow). Follow the center wire from the distributor to the coil and remove it. Make sure you do not forget to reinstall the cover on the coil when putting everything back together.

Remove the vacuum hose from the valve cover and the eight 10mm bolts holding the valve cover on.
Figure 6

Remove the vacuum hose from the valve cover and the eight 10mm bolts holding the valve cover on. The cover is now free of the head but may stick a little. Do NOT hit it with a hammer or try and force a screwdriver between the cover and head. You will only damage the cover or cause a leaky seal. Be patient and rock the cover loose with your hands.

Remove the three small Hex bolts holding the distributor cap on (red arrows), and then the four bolts that hold the distributor housing to the cylinder head (green arrows).
Figure 7

Remove the three small Hex bolts holding the distributor cap on (red arrows), and then the four bolts that hold the distributor housing to the cylinder head (green arrows). The drive belt tensioner is attached to the housing, remove the bolts from the bracket leaving it attached to the tensioner and move it to the side (yellow arrow).

Remove the heater line that runs across the front of the engine to the water pump (yellow arrows).
Figure 8

Remove the heater line that runs across the front of the engine to the water pump (yellow arrows). If you have not already done so loosen the hose that connects the head to the water pump (red arrows).

To get access to the chain tensioner (yellow arrow) you will need to move the smog pump out of the way.
Figure 9

To get access to the chain tensioner (yellow arrow) you will need to move the smog pump out of the way. Remove three of the four bolts holding the pump on and loosen the forth (green arrow), this will allow you to rotate the pump far enough out of the way without having to remove everything attached to the pump.

Using a 12mm Hex remove the tensioner plug and seal (careful as they are under tension from a spring).
Figure 10

Using a 12mm Hex remove the tensioner plug and seal (careful as they are under tension from a spring).

Next use a 17 mm Torx and unscrew the threaded ring inside the housing (yellow arrow).
Figure 11

Next use a 17 mm Torx and unscrew the threaded ring inside the housing (yellow arrow). With the ring gone you can remove the tensioner. The tensioner MUST be disassembled before reinstalling. Use a long small socket to push the pressure pin along with its detent spring from the housing. It must be pressed out pointy end first. Clean all the parts thoroughly. Make sure when you are reinstalling it that you follow the torque specs carefully, the inner ring and outer screw are torqued to different values.

Mark the cam chain sprocket in several places, I like to use White Out (yellow arrows).
Figure 12

Mark the cam chain sprocket in several places, I like to use White Out (yellow arrows). Using your Mercedes-Benz extractor, slide out the guide rail guide pin (green arrow). Remove the three Torx bolts holding the cam sprocket on and remove, making sure not to drop the chain into the engine.

If you are going to be removing the head without the exhaust manifold attached you will want to remove the studs from the head to give you more room to work.
Figure 13

If you are going to be removing the head without the exhaust manifold attached you will want to remove the studs from the head to give you more room to work. You can do this by double nutting them and then backing them out (red arrow). Don't forget to disconnect the EGR tube attached to the manifold

Whether you remove the head with or without the exhaust make sure to remove this emission tube from between the two exhaust manifolds.
Figure 14

Whether you remove the head with or without the exhaust make sure to remove this emission tube from between the two exhaust manifolds.

Undo the bolt for the automatic transmission tube from the back of the head.
Figure 15

Undo the bolt for the automatic transmission tube from the back of the head.

Remove the dip stick and tube by removing the mounting bracket between the first and second intake runner.
Figure 16

Remove the dip stick and tube by removing the mounting bracket between the first and second intake runner.

You will need to remove all the vacuum lines and electrical connections on the intake system and head.
Figure 17

You will need to remove all the vacuum lines and electrical connections on the intake system and head. Take lots of pictures and notes so you will know where everything goes when you are putting it all back together. Now remove the three 10mm nuts holding the wiring harness on (yellow arrows) and set the harness aside by the brake booster.

Open the gas cap to relieve some pressure and separate the fuel lines (red arrow, one fuel line shown).
Figure 18

Open the gas cap to relieve some pressure and separate the fuel lines (red arrow, one fuel line shown). Make sure you use two wrenches when removing the lines, one to support one fitting and the other to remove the other fitting. Also separate the vacuum line from the intake manifold to the brake booster (yellow arrow).

The red arrows show the second fuel line that must be separated.
Figure 19

The red arrows show the second fuel line that must be separated. Detach the two Bowden cables from the throttle linkage. Pop the end of the ball joint off the one cable connecting it to the linkage using a screwdriver (yellow arrow), and then press the plastic guide together and through the bracket (blue arrow). On the other cable, press the guide out of the fulcrum seat and pass the cable through the lever, then press the plastic clip together and pass it through the rear bracket (green arrows).

Remove the heater hose from the rear of the head.
Figure 20

Remove the heater hose from the rear of the head.

There are two brackets supporting the intake manifold to the engine block.
Figure 21

There are two brackets supporting the intake manifold to the engine block. They need to be removed from below.

22
Figure 22

This illustration shows the removal order of the hear studs

Using your 140mm long 12mm twelve point and a long breaker bar, remove the head studs in the proper order.
Figure 23

Using your 140mm long 12mm twelve point and a long breaker bar, remove the head studs in the proper order.

Attach your chain to the bracket on the rear driver's side of the head and the front of the head.
Figure 24

Attach your chain to the bracket on the rear driver's side of the head and the front of the head. Carefully lift the head from the engine. In this picture you can see we removed the head without the exhaust manifold but installed it with the manifold attached.

It is always a good idea to send your head out to have it cleaned and tested.
Figure 25

It is always a good idea to send your head out to have it cleaned and tested.

Remove the remains of the old gasket, inspect the piston crowns and the cylinder walls and carefully clean the mating surface.
Figure 26

Remove the remains of the old gasket, inspect the piston crowns and the cylinder walls and carefully clean the mating surface. Run a tap down each bolt hole on the engine deck, then tape a large straw into the end of a Shop Vac to suck out any liquid and trash. This cleans the threads and prevents hydraulic pressure from breaking the block or giving false bolt torque when installing the cylinder head. There was nothing wrong with our car when I pulled the head so I did not need to rotate the engine while working on it. If you need to rotate the engine while working on it just remember you will need to set the crank and the valve train at TDC for reinstallation. Your witness marks will be useless once you move the crank!

After carefully cleaning the head, installing a new EGR tube, new exhaust gaskets and torquing the exhaust manifold on, the head is ready for installation.
Figure 27

After carefully cleaning the head, installing a new EGR tube, new exhaust gaskets and torquing the exhaust manifold on, the head is ready for installation.

Place your new gasket on and carefully lower the head onto the block.
Figure 28

Place your new gasket on and carefully lower the head onto the block. There are two locating dowels on the block to help you seat the head.

This illustration shows the order of installation and torque for the head studs.
Figure 29

This illustration shows the order of installation and torque for the head studs.

Follow the torque instructions from Mercedes-Benz.
Figure 30

Follow the torque instructions from Mercedes-Benz.

If you have not moved the cam or the crank you should be able to reinstall the cam sprocket and everything should line right up.
Figure 31

If you have not moved the cam or the crank you should be able to reinstall the cam sprocket and everything should line right up. If you have sent the head out for work, moved the cam or the crank while working on the engine things will not line up and your witness marks will be useless. You will need to set both the crank and cam at TDC for installation. If you did not move anything and everything lines up correctly, it is a good idea once the chain tensioner is re installed and everything is torqued to rotate the engine from the crank to Top Dead Center and check that everything lines up with the witness marks just to be safe.

This image shows the reinstallation of the guide pin.
Figure 32

This image shows the reinstallation of the guide pin.

With everything clean you will first install the chain tensioner housing into the bore and then screw in the threaded ring and torque to your engines torque value.
Figure 33

With everything clean you will first install the chain tensioner housing into the bore and then screw in the threaded ring and torque to your engines torque value. Next insert the pressure pin with its detent spring into the assembled chain tensioner housing. Install the compression spring and screw plug and torque down.

Reinstall everything in reverse order.
Figure 34

Reinstall everything in reverse order. It is a good idea to check all of the items on your engine that regularly wear out: plugs, wires, cap, hoses, clamps, etc and replace them as needed while you are rebuilding the engine. It is also a good idea to change your oil as the engine has been open and coolant or fuel may have got into the engine.

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Comments and Suggestions:
Joey Comments: Where can I get a guide pin extractor and do I need an engine hoist to this DIY?
September 18, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Give The Pelican Parts parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can get you thew tool. If you don't have a hoist it will be hard to lift it out of the engine bAY.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
R Comments: Where can I find these 17 mm 12 point bits. You do not sell them on your website
April 10, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: They can be ordered. Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can figure out what part or repair kit you need.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Dick Comments: Please give me the locations for the three head screw
lengths I can't find them. I wonder why someone hasn't included this information I trust you all have had this
question before hope you respond this question relates to W123 617 300TD estate wagon
December 31, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: There is a parts link to the side of the article.

I found this for the model in article: Cylinder Head Bolt (12 X 100 mm 12 Point XZN) - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
bruce Comments: chain tensioner access screw is not torx but 12 point
October 31, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the additional info. We appreciate it. I will have the article updated.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
quesnoy Comments: In figure 27 it mentions changing the EGR tube. My EGR tube is clogged and needs to be changed. I was able to order a new EGR tube, but have discovered that it does not come with the fittings at each end. On top of that, it appears that there are what's called "cutting ring glands" at each end of the tube that hold on the fittings. Neither the fittings nor the cutting ring glands are available any more. Now, it appears that the cutting ring glands are shrink fit over the tube at each end, but I'm not sure. I guess I will have to find a machine shop experienced in shrink fitting. Hopefully they will be able to heat up the cutting ring glands so that I can remove and refit them onto the new tube. Can you please let me know if this is what you guys did when you changed over your EGR tube? If it isn't, please let me know what you guys did. Thanks. *I've attached a picture for your reference.*
August 29, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: That should come out. It is likely seized from age. I'm sure we can get new ones.
Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can figure out what part or repair kit you need.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
john Comments: What is torque value for timing chain tensioner 17 mm threaded ring that holds pin assemble in place. Also tensioner and pin move freely and cleaned .What is reason this must be disassembled before reinstall
May 24, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: The parts need to be reinstalled clean, hat is why you disassemble and clean them.

I don't have the torque specs handy.
I would grab a repair manual. It will have the procedure, special tools and torque specs.

Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799.- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
190elover Comments: One of the exhaust gaskets had slipped and was only on one stud. Fixed it and it's better than ever. An exhaust leak is LOUD. Here's that pic of the mystery gasket and several rings we don't know what to do with...
April 7, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the follow up. We appreciate it.


Gasket doesn't look familiar to m e. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
190elover Comments: Okay, completed the head gasket rebuild. Now it's knocking when I try to start it. It starts fine, but knocks as it runs. I was scared so I turned it off, only ran it about 30 seconds twice, I'm paranoid about breaking lifters and whatnot. I failed to coat everything with oil before I put the valve cover back on - could that be it? Did I damage it running it for just a minute?

Also - I got the Victor Reinz head gasket kit, and I don't know what some of the leftovers are - in particular there is a gasket, round with 4 bolt holes, and several little washer and rubber rings and stuff all in a baggie together. What is that? Why does nobody including the manufacturer list the contents of the kit so you know what it all is?
April 5, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Not all gaskets are used for each vehicle, the kits can contain extra parts. Do you have the part number of the extra gasket?

Check oil level and pressure to start. It is not uncommon for a faulty head gasket to do damage to the oil pump or bearings. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
190elover Comments: I did remove all the fastners in picture 7. It must be removed or the top cover for the timing chain cannot be removed. I spoke to several people on other benz forums that had run into this many times, some of them even had to drill it out in pieces and get a replacement. I just got mine out! I used some wd40 and then inserted a 10mm socket attached to a ratchet, and gently rocked it up, down, left and right and it finally came free and slid out - hooray! Now to make the timing marks...
March 31, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: OK GREAT! Sounds like it was just seized up. Thanks for the follow up. We appreciate it.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
190elover Comments: Okay - see no pic there either - the question is how do I remove the camshaft rotor adaptor. It's been unscrewed, everything is off, it just doesn't budge, not sure how to get it out.
March 30, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: It comes off together, with the distributor. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
190elover Comments: Not sure if my pic got attached to my post...
March 30, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: It did. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
190elover Comments: I got this far and can find no info anywhere on how to remove the upper timing chain cover, see photo. How do I get this off? Also, the metal heater line that runs in front doesn't want to disconnect on the right side - is there some trick to this? Thanks a bunch!
March 29, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: See figure 7, did you remove all of the fasteners noted? - Nick at Pelican Parts  
geo Comments: Hello I have a problem with my 190e 2.6 head gasket I order Lile three different ones but none fitted to small I masure the old gaske and is reading 7 inches around the piston could it be that engine got changed
January 15, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Check the engine for an engine code. Then, Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799 and they can help figure out which part or repair kit you need.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Don J Comments: I am planning to replace the head gasket on my W-104 95 engine due to a coolant leak at the rear passenger side. No other indications of a problem, but MB identified it during the last safety inspection. I've read your articles and they are very through, but wanted to ask several questions:
1. I want to clean pressure wash engine before I start project. Any thoughts about how; what to NOT do?
2. What substance do you recommend to "thoroughly" clean oil/debris from parts?
3. Do you use gasket sealer Locklite 5970 on any gaskets other than the timing chain gasket end points?
4. Any concerns attaching the hoist to the cam bearing bolts? I can not find the adapter that allows the hoist to attach like MB recommends. Do you know of a P/N and source for this part?
5. When timing the intake cam - can you clarify this regarding "while looking from front of engine, turn cam clockwise until the valves are level"?
Thanks for your input!
April 19, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I would not pressure was an engine.
Seafoam is a nice cleaner.
Do not add sealant to gaskets unless the repair manual calls for it.
I would not lift from the bearing threads.
I don't see anywhere in the article that mentions level valves.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
T Comments: Sorry for not getting back to you.
Your previous question was resolved once I installed a new "IGNITION COIL".
I can now start the vehicle with no problem. It will idle in neutral for a very long time, with a bit of random timed misfiring. This made me very happy
When it is in "Drive" i can travel at low speeds without it misfiring.
i was driving around a building -29 Celsius
I tried give it more gas so that i could power slide around the corners of the building and it worked. i tried to go around a second time and upon giving it more gas the car STALLED, i restarted it and drove it slowly back to a parking spot.
I also changed a leaking EHA VALVE{part of fuel system}did not change anything I could notice. No faults found. Thanks again for your help.
Not/couldn't Checked yet: fuel injector pulse and fuel pressure.
There is a small leak on a fuel line though. 4/101=no leak and 10=open water faucet
March 2, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the follow up. We appreciate it.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
T Comments: It will restart immediately after stalling the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd time, but after that it does not start so I wait about 30 seconds before trying again. I changed the battery just for good measure and reconnected a vacuum line from the air filter canister to the fuel regulator that was not connected for over 4000km of driving:.

It ran fairly good after that but then continued to stall after that.NEW http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ssWR327aX0s
February 8, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I can't help without knowing what is missing from the system when you are trying to start it. When your engine doesn’t start you’ll want to check the basics. Check spark, fuel injector pulse and pressure fuel, volume and quality. Are there any fault codes? Once you figure out what is missing, it will be easier to diagnose.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
T Comments: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ySRPfYWcgEw
This is my 190e problem can you help?
February 3, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Does it restart immediately after stalling? Or does it become a no start situation? - Nick at Pelican Parts  

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