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Turbocharged Engine Pressure Sensor Replacement
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

Turbocharged Engine Pressure Sensor Replacement

Nick Czerula

Time:

1 hour1 hr

Tab:

$200

Talent:

**

Tools:

8mm socket, T25 Torx

Applicable Models:

R56 MINI Cooper S Hatchback (2007-11)

Parts Required:

Intake pressure / temperature sensor, Manifold pressure sensor

Hot Tip:

Work with a cool engine. Clear engine fault codes when done

Performance Gain:

Car will run well

Complementary Modification:

Replace engine air filter, inspect intake air ducts for cracks

Starting with the 2007 R56 MINI Cooper S models, MINI introduced the turbocharged engine. This 1.6-liter 4-cylinder engine produces more power (an extra 40 hp) and torque (an extra 80 lb-ft) than the equivalent 1.6-liter normally aspirated engine. The key to the additional torque and power is the turbocharger closely mounted to the exhaust manifolds. As the exhaust is forced out of the cylinders, it powers a turbine that turns a compressor, essentially a high efficiency fan, blowing air forcibly into the intake system. The additional, denser, air increases combustion efficiency and power as needed. This is an efficient way to achieve higher power output from an engine without increasing engine displacement.

The DME controls turbocharger output or boost pressure with the wastegate. Feedback is delivered via the engine pressure sensors.

The intake manifold pressure sensor is located on the intake manifold. It measures the pressure in the intake manifold. The DME uses the signal from the intake manifold pressure sensor to calculate the mass of intake air. The pressure sensor also serves as a substitute variable for the engine load signal. This sensor is supplied 5 volts from the DME and signal voltage fluctuates depending on manifold pressure. Approximately 0.5 to 4.5 volts corresponds to a manifold pressure from 20 kPa (0.2 bar) to 250 kPa (2.5 bar).

The combined intake temperature and boost pressure sensor is located in the charge air duct downstream of the intercooler mounted before the throttle housing.

The boost sensor supplies the DME with information on the temperature and pressure of the charge air before the throttle housing. The ECM uses the signal from the intake manifold pressure sensor to adjust the position of the throttle valve and to control boost pressure. This boost sensor is supplied 5 volts from the DME. Signal voltage fluctuates depending on manifold pressure. Approximately 0.5 to 4.5 V corresponds to a boost pressure from 20 kPa (0.2 bar) to 250 kPa (2.5 bar).

The intake temperature sensor contains a temperature-dependent resistor that is mounted into the charge air duct and measures the temperature of the intake air. The resistor has a negative temperature coefficient (NTC). This means that the resistance decreases as temperature increases. The DME compares a stored MAP with sensor data to determine fuel delivery. The resistance changes dependent on temperature from 167 k Ohms to 150 Ohms, corresponding to a temperature from -40°C to 130°C.

A quick test of both the manifold and boost pressure sensors is to check the sensor reading with the key on engine off. Using a MINI scan tool, the reading should be about equal, as they are both reading ambient pressure. The intake temp sensor can be tested in a similar way using the coolant sensor as a comparison. With a cold engine, they should both read just about the same.

Keep in mind that when your car was serviced before, parts may have been replaced with different size fasteners used in the replacement. The sizes of the nuts and bolts we give may be different from what you have, so be prepared with different size sockets and wrenches.

Protect your eyes, hands and body from fluids, dust and debris while working on your vehicle. If you're working with the electrical system, disconnect the battery before beginning. Always catch fluids in appropriate containers and properly dispose of any fluid waste. Recycle parts, packaging and fluids when possible. Do not work on your vehicle if you feel the task is beyond your ability.

Vehicle models change and evolve, as they grow older, so the vehicle shown in our illustrations may vary slightly from yours. If something seems different, let us know and share your info to help other users. Do you have questions or want to add to the article? Leave a comment below. When leaving a comment, please leave your vehicle information.

Turn the engine OFF and remove the remote key from the ignition or the remote key slot.

In this tech article I will show you how to replace the intake manifold and boost pressure / temp sensor on a N14 MINI engine.

Start by detaching the breather hose at the valve cover.
Figure 1

Start by detaching the breather hose at the valve cover. Squeeze the collar (red arrow) and pull it off.

Working at the right corner of the intake air housing, remove the T20 Torx fastener (red arrow).
Figure 2

Working at the right corner of the intake air housing, remove the T20 Torx fastener (red arrow).

Move to the left side of the radiator support and remove the fresh air duct (red arrow).
Figure 3

Move to the left side of the radiator support and remove the fresh air duct (red arrow). It should be detached from the radiator support already. Unclip it from the intake air housing and remove it.

Move to the left side of the intake air housing and unclip the vacuum line (red arrow).
Figure 4

Move to the left side of the intake air housing and unclip the vacuum line (red arrow). Then lift the intake air housing up and remove it from the engine.

Working at the mass airflow sensor, disconnect the electrical connector (red arrow).
Figure 5

Working at the mass airflow sensor, disconnect the electrical connector (red arrow).

Lift the intake air housing up, pulling it out of the rubber mounting grommets, and remove it from the engine.
Figure 6

Lift the intake air housing up, pulling it out of the rubber mounting grommets, and remove it from the engine.

Manifold sensor: Disconnect the manifold sensor electrical connector by pulling the connector straight out of the sensor (red arrow).
Figure 7

Manifold sensor: Disconnect the manifold sensor electrical connector by pulling the connector straight out of the sensor (red arrow). Pull the tab up if needed to release the connector.

Manifold sensor: Using a 8mm socket, remove the sensor fastener (red arrows).
Figure 8

Manifold sensor: Using a 8mm socket, remove the sensor fastener (red arrows).

Manifold sensor: Remove the sensor from the manifold (red arrow).
Figure 9

Manifold sensor: Remove the sensor from the manifold (red arrow). If stuck, use a small flathead screwdriver to gently lever it out of the manifold. Most times it will pull out easily. Install a new sensor into the manifold and tighten the fastener. If the O-ring gives you a hard time going in, apply a small amount of dish soap to the O-ring. It will slide right in. The soap will not damage the O-ring. Check the vehicle for fault codes. See our tech article on reading and clearing fault codes. Then test drive the vehicle and confirm that the engine runs well. Note the oil residue on the sensor diaphragm (green arrow); this is as common as carbon on the valves. When dealing with carbon issues, it is a good idea to inspect the sensor to prevent future fault codes.

Boost sensor: Disconnect the boost sensor electrical connector by pulling the connector straight out of the sensor (red arrow).
Figure 10

Boost sensor: Disconnect the boost sensor electrical connector by pulling the connector straight out of the sensor (red arrow). Pull the tab up if needed to release the connector.

Boost sensor: Using a 8mm socket, remove the sensor fastener (red arrow).
Figure 11

Boost sensor: Using a 8mm socket, remove the sensor fastener (red arrow).

Boost sensor: Remove the sensor from the duct (red arrow).
Figure 12

Boost sensor: Remove the sensor from the duct (red arrow). If stuck, use a small flathead screwdriver to gently lever it out of the manifold. Most times it will pull out easily. Install a new sensor into the duct and tighten the fastener. If the O-ring gives you a hard time going in, apply a small amount of dish soap to the O-ring. It will slide right in. The soap will not damage the O-ring. Check the vehicle for fault codes. See our tech article on reading and clearing fault codes. Then test drive the vehicle and confirm that the engine runs well. The green arrow points to the temperature sensor portion of the sensor. If you are reinstalling an old sensor, be sure it is not damaged.

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Comments and Suggestions:
Salah Comments: Hi, I got P0108 code for the MAP sensor. I replaced the sensor and cleared the code. When I start the car, turn off, and restart, the code comes back again. any ideas? thank you
December 24, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Check the wiring for the sensor to the DME. Also be sure you replaced the right sensor. - Nick at Pelican Parts  

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