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Turbocharged Engine Charge Air Duct Replacing
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

Turbocharged Engine Charge Air Duct Replacing

Nick Czerula

Time:

3 hours3 hrs

Tab:

$200

Talent:

****

Tools:

Set of sockets, Flathead screwdriver, T20, Torx driver

Applicable Models:

R56 MINI Cooper S Hatchback (2007-11)

Parts Required:

Charge air ducts, charge air duct clamps, duct seals, O-rings

Hot Tip:

Work with a cool engine

Performance Gain:

Remedy fault codes and restore engine performance

Complementary Modification:

Replace air filter

Starting with the 2007 R56 MINI Cooper s models, MINI introduced the turbocharged engine. This 1.6-liter 4-cylinder engine produces more power (an extra 40 horsepower) and torque (an extra 80 lb.-ft.) than the equivalent 1.6-liter normally aspirated engine. The key to the additional torque and power is that the turbocharger is closely mounted to the exhaust manifolds. As the exhaust is forced out of the cylinders, it powers a turbine, which turns a compressor, essentially a high efficiency fan, blowing air forcibly into the intake system. The additional, denser air increases combustion efficiency and power as needed. This is an efficient way to achieve higher power output from an engine without increasing engine displacement.

However, compressing air also heats it. The turbocharged air (or charge air, for short) is therefore ducted to the front of the engine where it passes through an air-to-air heat exchanger (or intercooler) and then back up to the engine intake. The ducts used to port charge air have seals and flexible sections that fail over time. A faulty charge air duct can cause a number of problems, from a check engine light to a rough or surging idle. Before you condemn a specific charge air duct, be sure to inspect them all. They should be well-sealed and free from cracks or tears. Check the function of your crankcase breather valve. It is integrated into the valve cover. If a breather hose valve fails, the air leak can cause a rough idle or engine stalling.

Keep in mind that when your car was serviced before, parts may have been replaced with different size fasteners used in the replacement. The sizes of the nuts and bolts we give may be different from what you have, so be prepared with different size sockets and wrenches.

Protect your eyes, hands and body from fluids, dust and debris while working on your vehicle. If you're working with the electrical system, disconnect the battery before beginning. Always catch fluids in appropriate containers and properly dispose of any fluid waste. Recycle parts, packaging and fluids when possible. Do not work on your vehicle if you feel the task is beyond your ability.

Vehicle models change and evolve, as they grow older, so the vehicle shown in our illustrations may vary slightly from yours. If something seems different, let us know and share your info to help other users. Do you have questions or want to add to the article? Leave a comment below. When leaving a comment, please leave your vehicle information.

Place the radiator support into service mode. See our tech article on radiator support service mode. Remove or move the coolant reservoir aside. See our tech article on coolant reservoir replacing. Remove the engine-cooling fan. See our tech article on engine cooling fan replacing.

The charge air ducts are comprised of the intake air duct (red arrow) that runs to the turbocharger inlet (purple arrow), the left intake charge air duct (yellow arrow), and the right intake charge air duct (blue arrow) that runs from the outlet on the intercooler to the throttle housing (green arrow).
Figure 1

The charge air ducts are comprised of the intake air duct (red arrow) that runs to the turbocharger inlet (purple arrow), the left intake charge air duct (yellow arrow), and the right intake charge air duct (blue arrow) that runs from the outlet on the intercooler to the throttle housing (green arrow). To remove the charge air ducting that runs to and from the intercooler, place the radiator support into service mode. See our tech article on radiator support service mode.

Left charge air duct: Once in service mode, the left lower connection at the intercooler should be removed.
Figure 2

Left charge air duct: Once in service mode, the left lower connection at the intercooler should be removed. If you did not, loosen the hose clamp and pull the duct (green arrow) off the intercooler to remove it.

Left charge air duct: Working at the top of the engine, follow the duct (green arrow) down to the mount on the radiator shroud and remove the T20- Torx screw (red arrows).
Figure 3

Left charge air duct: Working at the top of the engine, follow the duct (green arrow) down to the mount on the radiator shroud and remove the T20- Torx screw (red arrows).

Left charge air duct: Loosen the hose clamp at the turbocharger outlet (red arrow).
Figure 4

Left charge air duct: Loosen the hose clamp at the turbocharger outlet (red arrow). Then pull the hose off the turbocharger.

Left charge air duct: Once detached from the turbo, lift the duct up to remove it (red arrow).
Figure 5

Left charge air duct: Once detached from the turbo, lift the duct up to remove it (red arrow).

Left charge air duct: With the duct removed, you can loosen the remaining clamps (red arrows) and separate and repair the baffle (green arrow) or hoses as needed.
Figure 6

Left charge air duct: With the duct removed, you can loosen the remaining clamps (red arrows) and separate and repair the baffle (green arrow) or hoses as needed.

Intake air duct: Working at the crankcase breather heating element, release the tab (red arrow) and disconnect the electrical connector.
Figure 7

Intake air duct: Working at the crankcase breather heating element, release the tab (red arrow) and disconnect the electrical connector.

Intake air duct: Then lift it up to detach the hose lock (red arrows) at the valve cover.
Figure 8

Intake air duct: Then lift it up to detach the hose lock (red arrows) at the valve cover.

Intake air duct: Remove the hose from the valve cover (red arrow).
Figure 9

Intake air duct: Remove the hose from the valve cover (red arrow).

Intake air duct: Working at the vacuum pump, press the brake booster line release tab (red arrow) and pull the vacuum line straight off the pump.
Figure 10

Intake air duct: Working at the vacuum pump, press the brake booster line release tab (red arrow) and pull the vacuum line straight off the pump.

Intake air duct: Loosen the intake air duct hose clamps (red arrows).
Figure 11

Intake air duct: Loosen the intake air duct hose clamps (red arrows).

Intake air duct: Remove the intake air duct from the turbocharger.
Figure 12

Intake air duct: Remove the intake air duct from the turbocharger. Then remove the intake air housing.

Right Charge air duct: Loosen the charge air duct hose clamp, and then remove the hose from the duct (red arrow).
Figure 13

Right Charge air duct: Loosen the charge air duct hose clamp, and then remove the hose from the duct (red arrow). This duct is usually already disconnected from placing the radiator support in service mode.

Right Charge air duct: Working at the right side duct, disconnect the electrical connector (red arrow), and then remove the 10mm fastener (green arrow).
Figure 14

Right Charge air duct: Working at the right side duct, disconnect the electrical connector (red arrow), and then remove the 10mm fastener (green arrow).

Right Charge air duct: Next, remove the right lower connection at the intercooler.
Figure 15

Right Charge air duct: Next, remove the right lower connection at the intercooler. Loosen the hose clamp and pull the duct (red arrow) off the intercooler to remove it.

Right Charge air duct: Working at the top of the engine, follow the duct (green arrow) down to the mount on the radiator shroud and remove the T20 Torx screw (red arrow).
Figure 16

Right Charge air duct: Working at the top of the engine, follow the duct (green arrow) down to the mount on the radiator shroud and remove the T20 Torx screw (red arrow). The yellow arrow points to the exhaust manifold for orientation.

Right charge air duct: Once detached from the turbo, lift the duct up to remove it (red arrow).
Figure 17

Right charge air duct: Once detached from the turbo, lift the duct up to remove it (red arrow).

Right charge air duct: With the duct removed, you can loosen the remaining clamp (red arrow) and separate and repair the duct or hose as needed.
Figure 18

Right charge air duct: With the duct removed, you can loosen the remaining clamp (red arrow) and separate and repair the duct or hose as needed.

Right charge air duct: One duct remains; it runs to the throttle housing.
Figure 19

Right charge air duct: One duct remains; it runs to the throttle housing. Start by detaching the breather hose at the valve cover. Squeeze the collar (red arrow) and pull it off.

Right charge air duct: Working at the right corner of the intake air housing, remove the T20 Torx fastener (red arrow).
Figure 20

Right charge air duct: Working at the right corner of the intake air housing, remove the T20 Torx fastener (red arrow).

Right charge air duct: Move to the left side of the radiator support and remove the fresh air duct (red arrow).
Figure 21

Right charge air duct: Move to the left side of the radiator support and remove the fresh air duct (red arrow). It should be detached from the radiator support already. Unclip it from the intake air housing and remove it.

Right charge air duct: Move to the left side of the intake air housing and unclip the vacuum line (red arrow).
Figure 22

Right charge air duct: Move to the left side of the intake air housing and unclip the vacuum line (red arrow). Then lift the intake air housing up and remove it from the engine.

Right charge air duct: Working at the mass airflow sensor, disconnect the electrical connector (red arrow).
Figure 23

Right charge air duct: Working at the mass airflow sensor, disconnect the electrical connector (red arrow).

Right charge air duct: Lift the intake air housing up, pulling it out of the rubber mounting grommets.
Figure 24

Right charge air duct: Lift the intake air housing up, pulling it out of the rubber mounting grommets. Remove it from the engine.

Right charge air duct: Working at the center of the intake manifold near the firewall, remove the T20 Torx screw (red arrow).
Figure 25

Right charge air duct: Working at the center of the intake manifold near the firewall, remove the T20 Torx screw (red arrow).

Right charge air duct: Working at the center of the firewall, detach the duct from the lower cowl (red arrow).
Figure 26

Right charge air duct: Working at the center of the firewall, detach the duct from the lower cowl (red arrow).

Right charge air duct: Working at the right side duct, loosen the hose clamp (red arrow).
Figure 27

Right charge air duct: Working at the right side duct, loosen the hose clamp (red arrow). Then pull the small hose off the duct.

Right charge air duct: Remove the duct and vent (red arrow) from the engine.
Figure 28

Right charge air duct: Remove the duct and vent (red arrow) from the engine. Repair it as needed.

Right charge air duct: If needed, you can separate the right upper duct from the duct that runs to the throttle housing.
Figure 29

Right charge air duct: If needed, you can separate the right upper duct from the duct that runs to the throttle housing. I usually leave them together. To separate them, lever out the retaining clip (red arrow) to the stop. Then pull the ducts apart.

Right charge air duct: Working at the throttle housing, loosen the hose clamp (red arrows).
Figure 30

Right charge air duct: Working at the throttle housing, loosen the hose clamp (red arrows).

Right charge air duct: Pull the duct off the throttle housing and remove it.
Figure 31

Right charge air duct: Pull the duct off the throttle housing and remove it. Be careful and don't lever on the throttle housing. R56 models have moved to plastic throttle housings. Any excessive pressure in the wrong spot can break them. Separate and repair the duct as needed. Reverse these steps to reinstall the ducts. Be sure that all hoses and clamps are in good condition before running your engine.



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