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Pelican Technical Article:

Vacuum Pump Replacement

Nick Czerula

Time:

2 hours2 hrs

Tab:

$500

Talent:

****

Tools:

8mm, 10mm sockets, flathead screwdriver

Applicable Models:

R56 MINI Cooper S Hatchback (2007-11)

Parts Required:

Vacuum pump

Hot Tip:

Work with a cool engine

Performance Gain:

Restored engine vacuum and brake performance

Complementary Modification:

Replace engine oil

The turbocharged engines used in MINI R56 vehicles are equipped with a vacuum pump to assist in creating engine vacuum for the engine accessories and brake booster. The vacuum pump is mounted to the left side of the cylinder head and is camshaft driven. The vacuum pump delivers a consistent 25" hg to the brake booster and accessory solenoids.

During operation the vacuum pump will make a knocking or tapping sound; this is normal. When the new engines equipped with vacuum pumps were introduced, the noise emitted was thought to be a problem pump. This however is not the case. Signs of a faulty pump are: low brake booster vacuum, hard brake pedal, and brake fade during application when stopped. The brake booster hose nipple on the pump can also show signs of a problem. Look for melted or overheated plastic.

In this article, I'll go over the steps involved with replacing the vacuum pump on turbocharged MINI R56 engines. Be sure to work with a cool engine.

Keep in mind that when your car was serviced before, parts may have been replaced with different size fasteners used in the replacement. The sizes of the nuts and bolts we give may be different from what you have, so be prepared with different size sockets and wrenches.

Protect your eyes, hands and body from fluids, dust and debris while working on your vehicle. If you're working with the electrical system, disconnect the battery before beginning. Always catch fluids in appropriate containers and properly dispose of any fluid waste. Recycle parts, packaging and fluids when possible. Do not work on your vehicle if you feel the task is beyond your ability.

Vehicle models change and evolve, as they grow older, so the vehicle shown in our illustrations may vary slightly from yours. If something seems different, let us know and share your info to help other users. Do you have questions or want to add to the article? Leave a comment below. When leaving a comment, please leave your vehicle information.

The vacuum pump is mounted to the left side of the cylinder head and is camshaft driven (red arrow).
Figure 1

The vacuum pump is mounted to the left side of the cylinder head and is camshaft driven (red arrow).

My vehicle has an oil catch can, so removing the intake duct may vary slightly on your vehicle.
Figure 2

My vehicle has an oil catch can, so removing the intake duct may vary slightly on your vehicle. Start by squeezing the release collar on the breather hose at the valve cover (yellow arrow) and pull the hose straight off. Then loosen both duct (green arrow) hose clamps (red arrows).

Detach and remove the intake duct (red arrow) from the intake air housing and turbocharger.
Figure 3

Detach and remove the intake duct (red arrow) from the intake air housing and turbocharger. Remove it from the engine.

Working at the vacuum pump, press the brake booster line release tab (red arrow) and pull the vacuum line straight off the pump (inset).
Figure 4

Working at the vacuum pump, press the brake booster line release tab (red arrow) and pull the vacuum line straight off the pump (inset).

Next, working at the front side of the vacuum pump, remove the vacuum hose (red arrow) by pulling it straight off.
Figure 5

Next, working at the front side of the vacuum pump, remove the vacuum hose (red arrow) by pulling it straight off.

Next, remove the vacuum pump fasteners.
Figure 6

Next, remove the vacuum pump fasteners. The rear one is a snap (red arrow). Use a 10mm socket and remove it. The lower one is a bit trickier (green arrow).

This photo shows the front fastener (green arrow).
Figure 7

This photo shows the front fastener (green arrow). The red arrow is pointing to the front vacuum nipple for orientation. Start by removing the line bracket fastener (yellow arrow). Then remove the vacuum pump fastener (green arrow). I use a 4.25-inch extension with a 10mm universal socket.

Pull the coil wiring harness (red arrow) up and place it behind the vacuum nipple (yellow arrow).
Figure 8

Pull the coil wiring harness (red arrow) up and place it behind the vacuum nipple (yellow arrow).

Then slide the vacuum pump straight out of the cylinder head to remove it.
Figure 9

Then slide the vacuum pump straight out of the cylinder head to remove it.

When installing, be sure to align the camshaft slot (red arrow) with the vacuum pump drive key (yellow arrow).
Figure 10

When installing, be sure to align the camshaft slot (red arrow) with the vacuum pump drive key (yellow arrow). Once aligned, insert the pump into the cylinder head and install the fasteners. Reassemble the engine, top up the engine oil and check the vacuum pump operation.


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Comments and Suggestions:
Legolover1076 Comments: The lower bolt in figure 6 is EXTREMELY annoying to take off. It's pretty much necessary to have a swivel socket to get it off.
April 17, 2017
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the additional info and feedback. We appreciate it.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
deano Comments: can you buy the connection for the push on pipe fitted with a torque screw ?
May 15, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Not that I am aware of. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Biochem Comments: Hi,
Would you happen to know what are the torque values for the two bolts that hold the vacuum pump to engine block on an R56 Cooper S?
Also, is it necessary to use a sealant like RTV on the mating surfaces?
February 23, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Don't use RTV unless called for, most gaskets do not require it.

I don’t have the torque info.

I would grab a repair manual. It will have the procedure, special tools and torque specs.

Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
sonic Comments: I bought a Pierburg vacuum pump. Compared it side-by-side with the original part, which the only difference is the the brass nipple of the vacuum hose Fig. 5 is not on the Pierburg. Looks almost identical, but is the Pierburg one i bought for a different Mini Cooper S model year?
October 4, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: S-models similar to the article should have the nipple. Best bet, check if there is a vacuum hose at the front lower corner of pump. - Nick at Pelican Parts  

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Page last updated: Tue 4/25/2017 02:52:27 AM