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Front Shock and Spring Replacement
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

Front Shock and Spring Replacement

Time:

4 hours4 hrs

Tab:

$200 to $500

Talent:

***

Tools:

Spring compressor, floor jack, jack stands

Applicable Models:

R50 MINI Cooper Hatchback (2002-06)
R52 MINI Cooper Convertible (2005-08)
R52 MINI Cooper S Convertible (2005-08)
R53 MINI Cooper S Hatchback (2002-06)
R55 MINI Cooper Clubman Wagon (2008-14)
R55 MINI Cooper JCW Clubman Wagon (2009-14)
R55 MINI Cooper S Clubman Wagon (2008-14)
R56 MINI Cooper Hatchback (2007-13)
R56 MINI Cooper JCW Hatchback (2009-13)
R56 MINI Cooper S Hatchback (2007-13)
R57 MINI Cooper Convertible (2009-15)
R57 MINI Cooper JCW Convertible (2009-15)
R57 MINI Cooper S Convertible (2009-15)

Parts Required:

Front shocks, upgraded shock mounts

Hot Tip:

Purchase an electric or air impact wrench for this task

Performance Gain:

Smoother, crisper handling

Complementary Modification:

Install performance springs and lower your suspension
How to Maintain and Modify your new MINI

This article is one in a series that have been released in conjunction with Pelican Parts' new book, How to Maintain and Modify your new MINI The book contains 240 pages of full color projects detailing everything from performance mods to changing your brake pads. With more than 500+ full-color glossy photos accompanying extensive step-by-step procedures, this book is required reading in any MINI owner's collection. The book is due to be released in late 2015. See The Official Book Website for more details.

One of the most popular projects to perform is the replacement of the front and rear shocks on the MINI. I usually recommend that you replace both the front and the rear at the same time, as they take roughly similar abuse over their lifetime, and the fronts or rears are not likely to be more or less worn than the other ones. As a rule, the shocks should always be replaced in pairs (left and right together).

I recommend that you replace your shocks every 50,000 miles or so, or if they start to show signs of fading or wearing out. If you push down on a corner of the car, it should spring back with almost no oscillation up and down. If the car bounces up and down, then you probably need new shocks. Different driving patterns may also affect the life of shock absorbers. Cars that are raced or often driven on windy roads may need to have their shocks replaced more often than street cars. It is also important to remember if you install performance springs into your car that lower it from its stock level, you will need to have the car realigned. Changing the height of the suspension also changes the values of the suspension settings.

With the car elevated in the air and the wheels removed, start with one strut, and remove both the ABS sensor and brake line grommets from the bracket on the strut. They may be a little difficult to remove, so use a small screwdriver to carefully pry them out (See Figure 2).

Next, locate the ball joints on either end of the sway bar link (See Figure 3). Each end is a ball joint which allows the link to rotate as the strut and sway bar move. Remove the upper and lower connections of the sway bar link to the strut. You will need to counter-hold the ball joint with a hex driver while you loosen and remove the 16mm nut holding it in place. A set of GearWrenches makes this task much easier. For the lower connection, it may be easier to use a long hex key driver to clear the sway bar itself as there isn't a lot of clearance (See Figure 4 and Figure 5).

At this point, it's not a bad idea to place a floor jack underneath the control arm right behind the outer ball joint to support the weight of the whole assembly (See Figure 6). You will now need to remove the tie rod end from the wheel housing. Remove the 16mm nut holding the end to the housing (See Figure 7). You may need to counter-hold the whole strut assembly with your other hand to keep it from moving. It also helps to turn the steering wheel all the way to one side for more access.

Sometimes, tie rod ends can be a real pain to remove. If you can't get the end out by lightly tapping on it, use a tie rod end puller to push it out. It also helps to spray a bit of penetrating oil over the top of the tie rod end. As you tighten the tool, it pushes the tie rod end down and out of the housing (See Figure 8 and Figure 9). These pullers are also available through Pelican Parts.

You'll next need to allow the wheel housing to move downward. This allows it to slide off the strut assembly. BMW specifies that you should remove the outer ball joint from the control arm via the large nut in the center, however it much easier to simply remove the two 13mm bolts securing the ball joint to the wheel housing (See Figure 10 and Figure 11)

Once the control arm is free of the wheel housing, you'll want to push it down as far as it will go and place the floor jack directly under the wheel housing. Now, remove the 18mm bolt clamping the wheel housing over the strut itself (See Figure 12 and Figure 13). Once removed, you will need to pull the wheel housing down off the strut. This may take a bit of effort and it doesn't hurt to spray a little lubricant around the collar. A consistent back and forth motion should free it up enough to slide the wheel housing down and off. Be careful as the housing is heavy. You may want to slowly lower the floor jack down so that it clears the strut. Once removed from the strut, carefully rest the wheel housing on the floor jack, making sure it doesn't fall off.

The only thing now holding the strut assembly to the car are the three 13mm nuts at the top of the shock tower (See Figure 14). Have a helper hold the strut assembly while you remove the nuts. The strut can now be removed from the car. Don't forget to pry off the small black cap in the center of the strut mount (See Figure 15).

Now, place the strut in a vise or secure it some other way, install your spring compressors onto the spring and compress them. There are a few different types of spring compressors. Make sure that you follow the manufacturer's directions for installing them. Also, while compressing the spring, be sure that you wear safety goggles: these springs are under a lot of pressure, and it is possible that the spring compressor may slip off suddenly.

Place the two halves of the compressor on exactly opposite sides of the spring. I have found it very useful to use two ratcheting wrenches (I prefer the ones manufactured by GearWrench and available at PelicanParts.com) on each side of the compressor to assure that I achieve even and equal compression on both sides. Failure to maintain even compression when compressing the springs can make the compressor slip off (See Figure 16).

With the spring compression removed from the strut assembly, remove the top nut of the assembly. This of course, is easier said than done. If you have an impact wrench, then simply zap this nut off. (See Figure 17)The reassembly process requires an impact wrench, so if you don't have one, now is a great time to buy one. I recommend the electric ones: no air compressor is required (see Tools of the Trade in the front of this book). If you don't happen to have an impact wrench at this time, then you can remove the nut by latching onto the top of the shock rod in the wheel well with some carefully placed locking pliers, in-between the springs. This is not the best method for removal, and if that top nut is on really tight, then it may not be possible to remove it this way.

Once the nut is off, remove the strut mount, the spring retaining plate, the spring pads and the spring itself and set it aside with the spring compressors still installed if you intend to re-use it (See Figure 18).

Now, put the new strut in the vise, using a towel or rag to protect it and fit the plastic dust sleeve over the strut rod, making sure it seats all the way down (See Figure 19). The new strut should already have this fitted along with a new foam bump stop underneath.

At the bottom of the new strut, fit the rubber coil spring pad over the strut rod, and down to the bottom of the spring seat. Make sure that the pad fits into the step at the bottom correctly. This pad gives the spring a good firm seat when it is installed (See Figure 20).

If you are reusing your old springs, then simply place them back onto the top of the lower spring pad. If you are replacing your springs with new ones, then move the spring to your workbench and slowly release the spring compressor on your old springs. Compress the new spring in a similar manner and install the spring, making sure that the coil end fits into the step on the rubber pad (See Figure 21 and Figure 22).

Once the spring is in place, fit the upper spring pad to the top of the spring, making sure that the coil end fits into the step on the pad. Then install the upper spring retainer plate over the pad, again making sure that the step in the plate fits onto the spring pad (See Figure 23 and Figure 24).

Fit the two washers over the strut rod and down onto the retaining plate. The thicker washer goes on first, followed by the thinner washer (See Figure 25 and Figure 26). Then install the new strut mount over the strut rod. The new strut should come with a new self-locking nut to secure the mount. Thread this nut on to the top of the strut rod (See Figure 27 and Figure 28).

One thing I discovered while assembling the new strut assembly is that the coil spring has a tendency to rotate independently of the strut when you use an impact wrench to tighten the top nut. This results in the spring unseating itself from the rubber pads on each end. What I ended up doing was making sure that the strut rod had enough threads penetrating into the nut at the top, then lightly backed off the spring compressors. This secured the spring in place against the rubber pads enough to hold it in place while I used the impact wrench to fully tighten the nut on top.

Once tightened down fully, carefully remove the spring compressors. Re-fit the black plastic dust cap in the center of the strut mount. The strut is now ready to go back on the car (See Figure 29). Now, fit the new strut assembly up through the wheel arch. Keep in mind that the strut mount is indexed to fit into the arch in only one way. It's a good idea to have a helper thread the three 13mm nuts on at the top once you have the strut assembly in place (See Figure 30).

The new strut assembly will be suspended from the wheel arch and the wheel housing must be jacked up over the strut and secured in the collar (See Figure 31). shows the housing oriented in position to slide up over the new strut. On the back of the strut is a bracket that fits into the slot on the back of the wheel housing. put a little lubricant over the bottom of the strut and jack the wheel housing up and over the strut. This may take a little effort to get everything lined up correctly, but once it does, the housing should just slide up into place. There is a collar stop on the bottom of the new strut so it can only go so far up. The bracket on the rear of the new strut has a hole in it for the large 18mm bolt to slide through. Refit the 18mm pinch bolt and torque it to spec.

Now move the floor jack aside and rotate the control arm up to line the outer ball joint up with the hole in the wheel housing. rotate the ball joint so the holes for the bolts line up and use new 13mm self locking bolts to secure it. Refit the tie-rod end to the wheel housing and use a new self-locking nut to secure it. Torque the new nut to spec.

Reattach the sway bar link to both the sway bar and the new strut. If the sway bar link is worn, this is a good time to replace it with a new one. Make sure to use new locking nuts on each end. Press fit the grommets for both the brake line and the ABS sensor wire into the brackets on the new strut (See Figure 32).

On R55/R56/R57 cars, the upper shock mount also contains a pin that locates the mount inside the upper strut tower. This pin is used to mark the position of the mount inside the tower and to set the camber for the front strut (See Figure 34). It is important to note the position of the pin prior to removing it. This pin indicates the factory camber setting and the strut mount must be placed in the same position to retain the correct camber.

Shown here are set of Bilstein Sport struts.
Figure 1

Shown here are set of Bilstein Sport struts. These are the struts of choice for Pelican and we also use them in our personal cars. They are the perfect choice for a good compromise of spirited driving and ride quality.

Start by removing the grommets holding both the ABS sensor (yellow arrow) and the brake line (green arrow) from the strut.
Figure 2

Start by removing the grommets holding both the ABS sensor (yellow arrow) and the brake line (green arrow) from the strut. You can use a small screwdriver to carefully pry them out.

ThisPicture shows the sway bar link that connects the sway bar to the strut.
Figure 3

This picture shows the sway bar link that connects the sway bar to the strut. Each end (green arrows) is a ball joint which allows the link to rotate as the strut and sway bar move.

Remove the upper and lower connections of the sway bar link to the strut.
Figure 4

Remove the upper and lower connections of the sway bar link to the strut. You will need to counterhold the ball joint with a hex driver while you loosen and remove the 16mm nut holding it in place. A set of Gearwrenches as seen here makes this task much easier.

Shown here is the lower sway bar connection with the 16mm nut removed.
Figure 5

Shown here is the lower sway bar connection with the 16mm nut removed. A long hex key driver may be helpful to clear the sway bar while removing the nut.

It's a good idea to support the whole strut/wheel housing assembly while you are working on it.
Figure 6

It's a good idea to support the whole strut/wheel housing assembly while you are working on it. A good spot is right underneath the control arm behind the outer ball joint.

Remove the 16mm nut securing the tie rod end to the wheel housing.
Figure 7

Remove the 16mm nut securing the tie rod end to the wheel housing. You may need to counterhold the whole strut assembly with your other hand to keep it from moving. It also helps to turn the steering wheel all the way to one side for more access.

Sometimes, tie rod ends can be a real pain to remove.
Figure 8

Sometimes, tie rod ends can be a real pain to remove. If you can't get the end out by lightly tapping on it, use a tie rod end puller as shown here. It also helps to spray a bit of penetrating oil over the top of the tie rod end. As you tighten the tool, it pushes the tie rod end down and out of the housing.

Shown here is the tie rod end removed from the wheel housing.
Figure 9

Shown here is the tie rod end removed from the wheel housing. You may want to clean the mating surfaces if there is a buildup of corrosion.

Remove the two 13mm bolts (green arrows) securing the outer ball joint to the bottom of the wheel housing.
Figure 10

Remove the two 13mm bolts (green arrows) securing the outer ball joint to the bottom of the wheel housing. This allows the wheel housing to move downward and slide off the strut assembly.

Carefully lower the floor jack, and pull the control arm downward.
Figure 11

Carefully lower the floor jack, and pull the control arm downward. This will pull the outer ball joint out of the wheel housing.

This large 18mm bolt (also called a pinch bolt) secures the strut assembly inside the wheel housing like a vise.
Figure 12

This large 18mm bolt (also called a pinch bolt) secures the strut assembly inside the wheel housing like a vise. place the floor jack under the wheel housing and remove the bolt. Be careful as there will be nothing securing the wheel housing to the strut once it is removed.

Shown here is the wheel housing sliding off the strut.
Figure 13

Shown here is the wheel housing sliding off the strut. It may take a bit of effort to loosen up the collar. Spray a little lubricant around the shock and rock it back and forth while it is sitting on the floor jack. Be careful as the housing is heavy.

With the wheel housing removed from the strut, the only thing securing the strut assembly to the car are three 13mm nuts on the top of the wheel arch (green arrows).
Figure 14

With the wheel housing removed from the strut, the only thing securing the strut assembly to the car are three 13mm nuts on the top of the wheel arch (green arrows). Have a helper hold the strut assembly and remove the nuts. You can now pull the strut assembly out of the car.

Don't forget to remove the protective dust cover off the top of the strut mount.
Figure 15

Don't forget to remove the protective dust cover off the top of the strut mount.

Secure the strut assembly in a vise or by other means and install your spring compressors over the coil spring.
Figure 16

Secure the strut assembly in a vise or by other means and install your spring compressors over the coil spring. You want to have them exactly opposite of each other to apply equal pressure to either side of the spring. This takes the load off the spring and allows you to remove the top nut.

Use an impact wrench to quickly zap the top nut off the assembly once the spring compressors are installed.
Figure 17

Use an impact wrench to quickly zap the top nut off the assembly once the spring compressors are installed. Shown here is an electric impact wrench. They are a good alternative to the traditional pneumatic ones.

Remove the upper strut mount, washers, bump stop and the compressed spring assembly from the strut and set it aside.
Figure 18

Remove the upper strut mount, washers, bump stop and the compressed spring assembly from the strut and set it aside.

Put the new strut in the vise, using a towel or rag to protect it and fit the plastic dust sleeve over the strut rod.
Figure 19

Put the new strut in the vise, using a towel or rag to protect it and fit the plastic dust sleeve over the strut rod.

Fit the rubber coil spring pad over the strut rod, and down to the bottom of the spring seat.
Figure 20

Fit the rubber coil spring pad over the strut rod, and down to the bottom of the spring seat. Make sure that the pad fits into the step at the bottom correctly. (green arrow)

Re-install the old spring or a new performance spring over the strut.
Figure 21

Re-install the old spring or a new performance spring over the strut. For sports struts, you will want to install performance springs such as Eibach or H&R. These will stiffen the suspension and lower the overall ride height of the car.

When installing the spring, make sure that its fits onto the rubber pad correctly.
Figure 22

When installing the spring, make sure that its fits onto the rubber pad correctly. The end of the spring fits into the pocket on the rubber spring pad (yellow arrow) and the spring pad fits into the step on the bottom of the spring seat. The whole assembly can easily rotate out of position so keep an eye on it.

23
Figure 23

Once the spring is in place, fit the upper spring pad to the top of the spring, making sure that the coil end fits into the step on the pad (green arrow)

Fit the upper spring retainer plate over the spring pad.
Figure 24

Fit the upper spring retainer plate over the spring pad. Make sure that the step in the plate fits over the

There are two washers that fit over the top spring retainer plate.
Figure 25

There are two washers that fit over the top spring retainer plate. First fit the thicker washer over the strut rod and the retainer plate. (green arrow)

26
Figure 26

Fit the thinner washer (yellow arrow) over the thicker washer (green arrow)

Next, fit the new strut mount over the strut rod and down onto the retainer plate.
Figure 27

Next, fit the new strut mount over the strut rod and down onto the retainer plate.

Thread the new nut on the strut rod and use the impact wrench to zap it down all the way.
Figure 28

Thread the new nut on the strut rod and use the impact wrench to zap it down all the way. Make sure that you hold the spring in place as you tighten it. The rotation of the strut rod can cause the spring to pop out of the spring pads/plates. You may even want to make sure the nut threads on enough to stay in place and relieve some of the tension on the spring compressors to lock everything in place.

Shown here is the completed strut assembly with the spring compressors removed and ready to be installed in the car.
Figure 29

Shown here is the completed strut assembly with the spring compressors removed and ready to be installed in the car.

Next, fit the new strut assembly up through the wheel arch.
Figure 30

Next, fit the new strut assembly up through the wheel arch. Keep in mind that the strut mount is indexed to fit into the arch in only one way. It's a good idea to have a helper thread the three 13mm nuts on at the top once you have the strut assembly in place.

Shown here is the wheel housing oriented in position to slide up over the new strut.
Figure 31

Shown here is the wheel housing oriented in position to slide up over the new strut. On the back of the strut is a bracket that fits into the slot on the back of the wheel housing. put a little lubricant over the bottom of the strut and jack the wheel housing up and over the strut. This may take a little effort to get everything lined up correctly, but once it does, the housing should just slide up into place. Refit the 18mm pinch bolt and torque it to spec.

Press the grommets for both the brake line (green arrow) and the ABS sensor (yellow arrow) into the holders on the new strut.
Figure 32

Press the grommets for both the brake line (green arrow) and the ABS sensor (yellow arrow) into the holders on the new strut. Make sure that they can move freely and are not binding on any other connections.

ThisPicture shows the new strut and spring installed in the MINI.
Figure 33

This picture shows the new strut and spring installed in the MINI. It's a good idea to double check all connections prior to taking the car out for a spin. Keep in mind that it will take a bit of time for the new shocks to settle, so don't be surprised if the car sits a little bit higher than you expected at first.

ThisPicture shows the location of the camber pin (green arrow) on the upper front strut mount of the later R55/R56/R57 MINI Cooper and Cooper S.
Figure 34

This picture shows the location of the camber pin (green arrow) on the upper front strut mount of the later R55/R56/R57 MINI Cooper and Cooper S.

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Comments and Suggestions:
Giants9595 Comments: When torquing the nut back onto the strut is there a torque I should torque it to or just zap it on with an impact wrench until it bottoms out on the threads of the strut? Also what size is that nut?
November 9, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: It should be torqued. I don’t have that info.

I would grab a repair manual. It will have the procedure, special tools and torque specs.


Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
RUI Comments: 2002 Mini cooper-s hardtop:is possible all my suspension shocks went bad almost at same time?few days apart.I see you recommend Bilstein sports struts for this car but I see a lot of people are going for the Koni fad's...I'm looking for shocks that gives me a smooth ride and keep the car at the same heigh cause when I went from flatrun tires to regulars ones the car got a little higher.I'll thank you for your time and help.the car right now bumps a lot when I drive it.
May 19, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: It's possible if there was a large impact. More likely some were faulty and not noticed until the rest failed.

Bilstein in a good factory replacement option. They make factory models and work well. Give The Pelican Parts parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can figure out what part or repair kit you need.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
wishmygirlfriendboughtalexus Comments: Im doing everything as directed and i notice i don't have a figure 12 pinch bolt seems to have snapped when a previous owner was working on the vehicle. anyway only the head of the bolt is broken making the strut impossible to come out? any suggestions or tools to get the broken bolt out and remove strut? broken strut pinch bolt
February 4, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Drill it out and replace it. Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can figure out what part or repair kit you need.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
vlindell Comments: Just finished installing new struts on my 2009 base Mini. I took "Lazylogan's" advice and just had to remove the three instead of five connections described and everything went fine. It really helps to have a electric impact wrench. It came in real handy to remove the pinch bolt, the top nut off the assembly and I even used it on the spring compressor. Thanks so much Pelican for the great tech articles and pictures.
May 3, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the additional info and feedback. We appreciate it.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Seth Comments: Just replaced mine and just FYI, you really don't need to remove the tie rod ends. It's just an extra unnecessary step. I just lowered it down with a jack and gave it a shake and the shock popped on out.

Also if you don't have a socket wrench with the through socket type, a 17mm wrench fits over a flat area around half way down the bolt for the sway bar links which allows you to easily loosen and tighten the bolt.
April 23, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the additional info and feedback. We appreciate it.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Kenny Comments: What's the name for the bolt in figure 12. Am trying replacing minds as it needs replacing. I've try typing in pinch bolt on pelican.com but that one bolt doesn't come up.
December 11, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Strut mount bolt, pinch bolt as you suspected. Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can help you find the right part.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Alex Comments: I'm having issues removing the bolt that holds the strut mount in. Not even my impact wrench seems to work. Any suggestions?
August 23, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Is the strut shaft spinning? If so and you are replacing the strut, counter-hold it with a pair of vise grips. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
B Comments: Awesome article, made the removal and installation a breeze. Getting the nut off the top of the shock was tricky and though I didn't use them, I would definitely recommend having open ended socket and wrench. Thank you for the articles!!!
August 9, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the additional info and feedback. We appreciate it.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
lazylogan Comments: Great walkthrough, but I gotta say, though, that the only 5 connections I found necessary to remove to get each strut out was the 18mm pinch bolt securing the strut to the knuckle, the sway bar link on the actual strut, and the three nuts securing the mount to the tower. I installed FSDs this way and experienced zero problems and much less work. By the way the vehicle now feels like a whole new car. It practically glides over bumps now.
April 26, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the additional info and feedback. We appreciate it.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Fische Comments: Awesome directions. Thank You!
February 26, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the feedback. Glad we could help.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Rangee Comments: Don't you need to realign the front suspension after replacing the front shocks?
February 4, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Yes, I would suggest doing so. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
jay Comments: Can I replace my pre 3/2002 front and rear struts with post 3/2002 struts? If so what parts need up graded?
October 19, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I'm not sure what the difference is between them, must be a very minor change. Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can help you assemble the right parts kit.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Kevenmac Comments: Can you please clarify something for me? The instructions seem to say that you do not need a spring compressor if you are using your old springs? That whole spring assembly just drops onto the new strut? Is that correct? Thanks!
October 5, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: You will need a spring compressor, otherwise personal injury could occur. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
BigErn Comments: Today 9-1 just did my 4 struts replacement.
Excellent instructions. The front struts are tricky to get in but a little bit of grease helped it make it better.
When I compressed the springs, I did not compressed them too much. Just enough to release the pressure on the strut and when disassembled the struts I did it on a workbench in a same order I took them apart. This way I had no left over parts.
September 1, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the feedback. Glad we could help. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Emmy Comments: I have heard that an allen key and a spark plug socket can be used to remove the strut nut. Is there a reason you prefer to use an impact wrench? Is this not more jarring to the strut assembly?
August 29, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Personally I like to use a a socket Allen combination I have made for the task. However, many mechanics I know prefer to use an impact, mainly for speed. The imapct will put less force on the strut that the car will, it is fine. As long as you don't tighten it with the impact and torque it when reassembling. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Emmy Comments: The materials required says "upgraded rear shock mounts". Is this an error? Is this not supposed to be for the front struts and not the rear?
August 20, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I think you are correct. Thanks for catching that. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
JAB Comments: Great walk-through. The pictures are great. From looking elsewhere online it seems like many Mini's including mine have strut pinch bolts that are rusted in-place. Many people snap off the heads when they try to remove this bolt. If this happens, my guidance would be to just bite the bullet and drill it out all the way to the threads and install a new nut and bolt that goes through the whole pinch section to hold the strut to the knuckle. This is how the newer Mini's are designed anyway. Don't waste your time trying to save the bolt/threads. Trust me it's not worth it.
August 13, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the additional Info. We appreciate it. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Kingblackfoot Comments: I forgot use thinner washer ,is a big issue?
June 15, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I would suggest installing the thinner washer. It is an important piece of the puzzle. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
KingBlackFOot Comments: I don't have any spec. for torque. Could you tell me how many feet/pound for some key nuts?
June 8, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I would grab a repair manual. It will list the torques and each step of the procedure. Give our parts specialists a call: 1-888-280-7799 They will help you find what you need. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
awkmanthewise Comments: You guys are great! Thanks for the assist I definitely needed it.
May 21, 2012
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: No sweat, if you like the articles you see here, be sure to tell all your friends with MINIs! - Wayne at Pelican Parts  

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