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Pelican Technical Article:

Porsche Boxster / 996 Engine Teardown & Disassembly
Page 13

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Difficulty Level: 4
Difficulty scale: Adding air to your tires is level one
Rebuilding a Porsche Motor is level ten

  This article is one in a series that have been released in conjunction with Wayne's new book, 101 Performance Projects for Your Porsche Boxster.  The book contains 312 pages of full color projects detailing everything from performance mods to changing your brake pads.   With more than 950+ full-color glossy photos accompanying extensive step-by-step procedures, this book is required reading in any Boxster owner's collection. The book is currently available and in stock now. See The Official Book Website for more details. 
Figure
Figure 1
All the bolts loosened.
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Figure 2
Tapping the crankshaft bearing housing.
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Figure 3
The bearing housing is beginning to separate.
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Figure 4
Separating the halves.
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Figure 5
Tapping on each half to separate it.
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Figure 6
Coming apart.
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Figure 7
Gently pry apart.
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Figure 8
Ooops, we just realized that the pistons need to come off of course since we are not disconnecting the rods at this point.  Release the circlips from the pistons and slide the piston pins out.
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Figure
Figure 9
Piston pin and circlip.  Wear eye protection when taking these out - they can easily fly across the room.
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Figure 10
It's also smart to mark the direction and number of each piston removed.
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Figure 11
Piston pin and piston removed.
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Figure 13
Mark each piston.
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Figure 14
Here's another close-up shot of that cooked bearing.  The main bearings look pretty bad and black too (top).  Normally, the bearings would not look this ugly on an engine coming apart.
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Figure 15
Removal of the last piston.
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Figure 16
Crankshaft bearing housing with pistons removed.
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Figure 17
Here's another shot of that cooked rod bearing.  Definitely caused by a lack of oil there.  Perhaps the previous owner forgot to check their oil level?
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Figure 18
Here's a photo of the crankshaft with the broken rod half still attached.
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Figure 19
Crankshaft, and the the crankshaft bearing housing halves.
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Figure 20
Close-up of the crankshaft.
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Figure 21
Close-up of the crankshaft.
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Figure
Figure 22
Where did that missing rod go?  Oh, here it is, in little chunks at the bottom of our oil drain pan.  We really had to hunt for it.
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Figure 23
These crankshaft bearings look okay but not great.
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Figure
Figure 24
Crankshaft with broken rod.
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Figure
Figure 25
Crankshaft bearings.
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Figure 26
Crankshaft bearings.
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Figure 27
Crankshaft bearings housing halves.
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Figure 28
Crankshaft with cooked bearing again.
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Figure 31
Here's a close-up of that spun rod bearing.
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Figure 32
Here's another close-up of that spun rod bearing.
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Figure
Figure 33
Crankshaft bearing housing halves.
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Figure 34
In this photo you can see the discoloration from the extreme heat.
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Figure 35
This photo shows the heat discoloration too.
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Figure 36
The opposite end of the crankshaft looks pretty good.
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Figure 37
These engines use a cracked rod design, where the rods are forged and machined, and then broken.  Then the bearings are installed and they are put back together again.  This cracked-rod design is cheaper to manufacture, and the rod bolts don't need to have integrated ""guide" pins as part of their design (like the rod bolts used on the older air-cooled engines).  Unless you use some type of oversized bearing, you cannot rebuilt or remachine these rods.
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Figure
Figure 38
Here's an edge view of the rod and it's rod end cap.  Because they are "broken" together, the two remain tightly joined when the rod bolts are torqued down.
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Figure 39
Here's a good shot of the rod, end cap, and one rod bolt.  Note that the rod bolt is a normal bolt with no shoulder, unlike the bolts from the earlier air-cooled engines.
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Well, there you have it.  I hope that you have enjoyed my photos of our Boxster / 996 M96 Engine Teardown.  For me it was a good learning experience, especially as everyone starts to learn about how to rebuild and improve these engines.  Parts for rebuilds are expensive right now, but as the cars get older, and more motors need rebuilding, then they will become less expensive.

 

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Comments and Suggestions:
Mandy Comments: This is a fantastic article. I'll be looking to buy this book soon. Great job Wayne!

Mandy 996 Carrera
October 2, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff:
Thanks for the feedback. Glad we could help. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
GLIDE Comments: Wayne,

Thank you for this writeup... it is very interesting. I am considering rebuilding a 3.4 from a 996... as it has been 3 years since this was written, has a rebuild guide been written?
May 6, 2012
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Sorry, no rebuild guide just yet. Maybe in the future! - Wayne at Pelican Parts  
Roger Comments: So after engine teardown and the damage known were there any usable major components remaning or is there a list of new components that were purchased? In addition what was the cost for getting this vehicle back on the road.
June 24, 2010
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: This particular engine was completely destroyed. We put a brand new 3.4 into the Boxster, see here: http://www.pelicanparts.com/techarticles/Boxster_Tech/11-ENGINE-911_Engine_Swap/11-ENGINE-911_Engine_Swap.htm - Wayne at Pelican Parts  
goldsc78258 Comments: Great help specially now that I'm getting ready to do a boxster s rebuild
April 22, 2009
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the feedback. Glad we could help.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
JINKATIN Comments: Wayne, It looks great, easy to follow directions, pictures help quite a bit, and this coming from someone who has never dropped an engine or let alone taken one apart. I hope this feedback helps.

Jinkatin
86 911 Carrera
April 15, 2009
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the feedback. Glad we could help.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
DRACO A5OG Comments: Oh my, this is much better with great detail and easy to understand steps.

Great Job Wayne!
April 14, 2009
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the feedback. Glad we could help.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 

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