Boxster Parts Catalog Boxster Accessories Catalog Boxster Technical Articles Boxster Tech Forums
Get FREE Ground Shipping with the purchase of $179 in qualifying parts!
 
FEATURES
PORSCHE 911 TECH ARTICLES
> Valve Adjustment
> Shifting Improvements
> Jacking Up Your 911
> Fuel Filter & Accumulator Replacement
> Steering Bushing Replacement
> 911 Forum
PORSCHE BOXSTER TECH ARTICLES
> IMS Bearing Replacement
> Air / Oil Separator
> Coolant Flush
> Spark Plug and Coil Replacement
> Brake Pad Replacement
> Boxster Forum
PORSCHE 996 TECH ARTICLES
> Water Pump & Thermostat Replacement
> MAF Sensor Replacement
> Fuel Line Vent Valve
> Air Conditioning Maintenance
> Auto Transmission Fluid Replacement
> 996-997 Forum
CAYENNE TECH ARTICLES
> Blower Fan Replacement
> Fuel Pump & Filter Replacement
> Air Filter Replacement
> Hatch Shock Replacement
> Glove Box Catch Replacement
> Cayenne Forum
> View All Porsche Tech Articles
EXTRAS
> Classifieds
> Accessories
> Porsche Parts List
> Porsche Events
> Cars for Sale


Pelican Technical Article:

Porsche Boxster / 996 Engine Teardown & Disassembly
Page 11

Jump to Page:

Difficulty Level: 4
Difficulty scale: Adding air to your tires is level one
Rebuilding a Porsche Motor is level ten

  This article is one in a series that have been released in conjunction with Wayne's new book, 101 Performance Projects for Your Porsche Boxster.  The book contains 312 pages of full color projects detailing everything from performance mods to changing your brake pads.   With more than 950+ full-color glossy photos accompanying extensive step-by-step procedures, this book is required reading in any Boxster owner's collection. The book is currently available and in stock now. See The Official Book Website for more details. 
Figure
Figure 1
Here's a close-up of the small intermediate shaft end bearing.  The hex-stud sticking out of the shaft is what drives the oil pump.
Large Image | Extra-Large Image
Figure
Figure 2
Here's another shot of the aluminum "bearing" where the intermediate shaft rides in the oil pump housing.
Large Image | Extra-Large Image
Figure
Figure 3
Here's a photo of the crankshaft pulley seal.
Large Image | Extra-Large Image
Figure
Figure 4
The main chain rail is held on with a small circlip that needs to be removed.
Large Image | Extra-Large Image
Figure
Figure 5
Circlip removed - you can now pull the ramp off.
Large Image | Extra-Large Image
Figure
Figure 6
Remove the bolts that hold the oil baffle plate / separator to the crankshaft bearing housing.
Large Image | Extra-Large Image
Figure
Figure 7
Remove the bolts that hold the upper guide for the main chain.
Large Image | Extra-Large Image
Figure
Figure 8
Using four of those super-huge studs as "handles", insert them into the crankshaft bearing housing.
Large Image | Extra-Large Image
Figure
Figure 9
Whoops, don't forget this bolt on the opposite side.  It attaches the crankshaft bearing housing to the case half.
Large Image | Extra-Large Image
Figure
Figure 12
Here's something we almost missed - you cannot take the crankshaft bearing housing off without taking off the pulley.  The boss that is used for the Top Dead Center (TDC) tool gets caught on the outer rim. 
Large Image | Extra-Large Image
Figure
Figure 14
Lock the pulley into place using the TDC tool and then remove the large pulley nut. 
Large Image | Extra-Large Image
Figure
Figure 10
With a friend nearby, pry up on the crankshaft bearing housing, and it should lift off of the engine with the intermediate shaft closely in tow.
Large Image | Extra-Large Image
Figure
Figure 13
Whoops, this fell out the opposite end when we started to lift the whole assembly.
Large Image | Extra-Large Image
Figure
Figure 15
Lifting the whole assembly.  It's heavier than you would think it should be.
Large Image | Extra-Large Image
Figure
Figure 16
This is really a two-man job.  I would not try to lift this yourself.  The angle is all wrong.  This photo really reminds me of when Indy and Sallah are lifting the cover of the ark in "Raiders".
Large Image | Extra-Large Image
Figure
Figure 17
The main chain will hold the intermediate shaft in place - don't worry about it falling apart.
Large Image | Extra-Large Image
Figure
Figure 18
Set the assembly down on your workbench so that you can complete the disassembly.
Large Image | Extra-Large Image
Figure
Figure 19
This six-cylinder Porsche engine is now a four-cylinder.
Large Image | Extra-Large Image
Figure
Figure 20
Crankshaft pulley end and intermediate shaft.
Large Image | Extra-Large Image
Figure
Figure 21
Top view of the assembly.
Large Image | Extra-Large Image
Figure
Figure 22
Two of the remaining pistons.
Large Image | Extra-Large Image
Figure
Figure 23
Close-up shot of the piston rings.  The oil scrapper ring is very thin.
Large Image | Extra-Large Image
Figure
Figure 24
Here's the flywheel end and the intermediate shaft where the infamous intermediate shaft bearing is inserted.
Large Image | Extra-Large Image
Figure
Figure 25
Here's the camshaft solenoid advance mechanism.  Basically, as you actuate this solenoid, the two camshafts turn towards each other and the timing of the intake camshaft changes (the exhaust camshaft is attached to the chain that is driven by the intermediate shaft, so it's timing cannot change).
Large Image | Extra-Large Image
Figure
Figure 26
Ugly shot of the now four-cylinder motor.
Large Image | Extra-Large Image

Previous Page | Next Page

Jump to Page:

  Loading Customer Comments...

Got more questions?  Join us in our Boxster / Cayman Technical Forum Message Board, and ask a question to one of our many automotive experts.
QUICK LINKS
About Us
Careers
Pelican Parts, Inc.
1600 240th Street
Harbor City, CA 90710
Order Online or Call:
888-280-7799
CONNECT WITH US
NEWSLETTER
Sign Up for Pelican Pit Stop News & Special Offers