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Pelican Technical Article:

Porsche Boxster / 996 Engine Teardown & Disassembly
Page 10

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Difficulty Level: 4
Difficulty scale: Adding air to your tires is level one
Rebuilding a Porsche Motor is level ten

  This article is one in a series that have been released in conjunction with Wayne's new book, 101 Performance Projects for Your Porsche Boxster.  The book contains 312 pages of full color projects detailing everything from performance mods to changing your brake pads.   With more than 950+ full-color glossy photos accompanying extensive step-by-step procedures, this book is required reading in any Boxster owner's collection. The book is currently available and in stock now. See The Official Book Website for more details. 
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Figure 1
Rotate the engine so that the water pump side is facing down.  Capture the top chain with a tool to prevent it from getting caught inside the case.
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Figure 2
There is a bolt that is "hidden" here - it looks very much like a case oil plug, but in fact, it's a bolt that holds the case halves together.  There are two of these - there's one on the opposite side that needs to be removed when you're ready to remove the crankshaft bearing housing (more on this bolt later).
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Figure 3
Here's that really long bolt being removed from the case.
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Figure 4
With all of the bolts removed, you should be able to start prying on the case to split the two halves apart.  There are a few spots on the case where it's okay to pry them apart.  Only use these areas as you don't want to scratch the case surfaces - there's no seal or o-ring that goes in there - it's just metal-sealant-metal.
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Figure 5
Pry to begin the separation of the case halves.
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Figure 6
Prying from the backside.
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Figure 7
More prying.  It's not difficult to get these apart - we're just being very cautious.
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Figure 9
Gently working your way around the case.
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Figure 10
More prying...
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Figure 11
It's coming apart...
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Figure 12
With two people working the case, begin the lift process.
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Figure 13
Wiggle it to get it to rise...
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Figure 14
And we're golden.  That's Tony Callas on the right.
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Figure 15
Lifting the case half off.  It's not heavy, but can be unwieldy if you try to lift it by yourself.
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Figure 16
Here's the case half resting on our photo backdrop.
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Figure 17
Pretty ugly in there.  Looks like my 3-year old took a bottle of Bosco and dumped it in the engine.  Actually, it looks more like she ate the whole bottle of Bosco and then threw up into the engine.
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Figure 18
This oil baffle / separator seal is torn.  We're not sure how this happened, but it is suspicious in nature.  This engine apparently had some oil starvation problems (more on this later).
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Figure 19
Ouchie.  This appears to be where all the damage began.  This bearing (#1) is cooked completely and burned into the crankshaft.  This is symptomatic of a drop in oil pressure.  The bearing becomes very hot and then basically fuses itself to the shaft.  Then the rod seizes and completely breaks.  The rod for this cylinder was completely missing - we had to go look for it - it was in 4-6 pieces at the bottom of the engine (more photos on this later).
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Figure 20
Another shot of the cooked bearing.
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Figure 21
More carnage.
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Figure 22
This is a good close-up photo of the bearing as it was cooked on the shaft.  It's difficult to take a good shot of this because the bearing is black, but the surrounding crankshaft is mirror-like, which reflects the light of the camera (dark and light at the same time).
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Figure 23
The lower plastic oil baffle / separator is cracked and damaged - presumably from the rod flying around inside the engine.
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Figure 24
Here's a good shot of the entire intermediate shaft.  The oil baffle plate / separator is one piece, and it wraps around the other side, so you can't take out the intermediate shaft without taking out the crankshaft bearing housing.
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Figure 25
Here's a shot of the crankshaft pulley side.  It's interesting to note that the pulley end of the intermediate shaft has a bearing design that is similar in nature to the intermediate shaft bearings used on the very early 911s (1965-67).  The shaft runs in the bare aluminum, lubricated by oil from the pump.
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Figure 26
Close-up shot of the crankshaft bearing housing.
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Figure 27
Intermediate shaft and oil baffle / separator.
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Figure 28
In this photo you can see the oil baffle / separator seal is not properly seated on this side.  Since this engine obviously had an oil pressure problem, things like these are important to take a closer look at.
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Figure 29
Here's one of the pistons with the piston circlip, which is very difficult to install in the engine when it's being rebuilt.  You need a special Porsche tool, and lots of patience.  I have heard it's like playing that childhood game, "Operation".  One mistake, and you can easily drop the circlip inside the engine.
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Figure 30
More brown sludge.
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Figure 31
I'm swiping at the sludge with my finger.  I can't recall why I did this...
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Figure 32
Here's a shot from the top.
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Figure 33
Oddly shaped pistons.
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Figure 34
Here's a close-up shot of the main chain that drives the intermediate shaft.  It's impossible to get this chain off while the crankshaft and intermediate shaft are installed in the case, so we need to remove them together as an assembly.
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Figure 35
This is the backside of the oil pump and it's also where the small end of the intermediate shaft runs. Oil from the oil pump gears (on the opposite side) obviously feed the small intermediate shaft bearing with oil (not the roller bearing I was discussing previously - that's on the opposite end).
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