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Pelican Technical Article:

Porsche Boxster / 996 Engine Teardown & Disassembly
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Difficulty Level: 4
Difficulty scale: Adding air to your tires is level one
Rebuilding a Porsche Motor is level ten

  This article is one in a series that have been released in conjunction with Wayne's new book, 101 Performance Projects for Your Porsche Boxster.  The book contains 312 pages of full color projects detailing everything from performance mods to changing your brake pads.   With more than 950+ full-color glossy photos accompanying extensive step-by-step procedures, this book is required reading in any Boxster owner's collection. The book is currently available and in stock now. See The Official Book Website for more details. 
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Figure 1
When you want to time the cams and relieve pressure on the main tensioner / advance mechanism, you use a special bolt / tool inserted into this hole and it locks the tensioner in place.  This will allow you to keep the chain in the desired place, and allow you to time the cams using the factory tool.
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Figure 2
The two cams are removed together.  Yes, you can perform the camshaft removal and replacement with the engine in the car (Callas Rennsport has done that before on a Boxster), but it's not fun nor pretty.  Lots of careful maneuvering is required.   These four bolts hold on the top and bottom camshaft end caps.  Remove them, but remember which cap goes where.
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Figure 3
Here we are carefully removing the exhaust camshaft sprocket.  Again, it's good practice to mark where this goes on the camshaft for future assembly.
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Figure 4
Carefully pull off the sprocket.
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Figure 5
Another shot of us pulling off the sprocket.
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Figure 6
Now remove the end caps completely.
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Figure 7
Here's a shot of the assembly, all ready to be removed (once we remove our camshaft holding tool).
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Figure 8
Keep the end caps on your tray in order, so you know which camshaft they fit and in which direction they go.
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Figure 9
With everything disconnected, the entire assembly simply pulls off of the engine.
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Figure 10
Here's another shot of us pulling off the camshaft assembly.  The tensioner / advance mechanism  pulls off with both the intake and exhaust camshafts.
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Figure 11
The best place to store the assembly is back inside the camshaft housing cover.
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Figure 12
Here's a shot of the engine with the camshafts removed.
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Figure 13
If you haven't removed it already, remove the chain ramp tensioner from the bottom of the engine case.
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Figure 14
With the tensioner removed, you might be able to wiggle the exhaust camshaft sprocket out of the chain and out of the engine.  We actually removed this later on.
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Figure 15
With the camshafts out of the way, you should be able to pluck the camshaft hydraulic followers out of the cam follower housing.  Use a magnetic tool to grab them out of there and be sure to place them in a tray, marking which valve they are matched to.  When you reassemble the engine, you want to make sure that you reinstall the followers into the same exact bore that they came out of.  This will reduce premature camshaft wear. 
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Figure 16
Here's another photo of us removing the cam followers (also known as a valve tappet).
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Figure 17
Time to remove the cam follower housing.  Simply remove the small bolts that attach it to the head.
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Figure 18
Lift out the cam follower housing.
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Figure 19
Another photo of the cam follower housing removal.
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Figure 20
If you haven't removed it yet, now is a good time to remove the lower exhaust camshaft sprocket.
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Figure 21
Remove this small support plate.
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Figure 22
There are a bunch of small screws that help hold the head to the engine case.  You'll have to go around the case and remove these.  Here's one that is hidden in the recesses of the case.
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Figure 23
The chain ramps ride on these bolts - remove them from the outside of the engine case so that you can pull out the chain ramps.
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Figure 24
Chain ramp bolt, coming out...
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Figure 25
Chain ramp bolt - as you can see, it's an odd-shaped bolt with an integrated o-ring (that can leak).
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Figure 26
Big, long head bolts connect the heads to the case and the inside crankshaft bearing case.  They require a torx tool to remove.
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Figure 27
Here's one of the head bolts coming out.
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Figure 28
Wow, look at the size of this sucker!  Based upon my experience with Dilavar studs, and other problems on the early 911 air-cooled motors, I would have thought that such a long bolt like this would have given Porsche some problems over the years.  However, I have not heard of any problems with these bolts in particular so who knows?
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Figure 29
Here's a shot of two small bolts that help hold the cylinder head to the engine case.  They are covered with dirt and easily camouflaged with respect to the rest of the case.
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