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Pelican Technical Article:

Porsche Boxster 996 Engine Swap
Page 17

Difficulty Level: 9
Difficulty scale: Adding air to your tires is level one
Rebuilding a Porsche Motor is level ten

  This article is one in a series that have been released in conjunction with Wayne's new book, 101 Performance Projects for Your Porsche Boxster.  The book contains 312 pages of full color projects detailing everything from performance mods to changing your brake pads.   With more than 950+ full-color glossy photos accompanying extensive step-by-step procedures, this book is required reading in any Boxster owner's collection. The book is currently available and in stock now. See The Official Book Website for more details. 
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Figure 1
   This photo shows the coils unplugged from the opposite side of the engine.
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Figure 2
   This photo shows the fuel injectors unplugged from the wire harness on the opposite side of the engine.
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Figure 3
   Plugs completely disconnected from the three coils.  Exhaust manifold / header has been removed from this side as well.
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Figure 4
   Here I show the removal of the opposite side fuel rail.  In the same manner, simply pull them out of the manifold after removing the bolts that hold them in.
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Figure 5
   This photo shows the fuel rails, connecting fuel line and injector assembly on my workbench.  The fuel lines are hard-plastic ABS that is formed around barb connectors.  On these modern cars, they went away from using rubber and hose clamps.  I suppose this was for a cost savings (both in parts and assembly time), but I'm not sure how these will hold up after 20-30 years of heat cycling in the engine compartment.  In all fairness though, the Porsche 914 from the 1970s had hard plastic lines that they used to run fuel down the center tunnel of the car, and most of the time those lines lasted a very long time.
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Figure 6
   Here's a close-up shot of the injector on the rail.  It's attached and held in place by a small metal clip that you simply slide out of place to remove the injector.
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Figure 7
   This shows the injectors from another angle.
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Figure 8
   Slide this metal clip out to remove the injector from the rail.
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Figure 9
   There's a big fat o-ring on the end of the injector, and it will take some amount of effort to pull it out of its bore in the fuel rail.  You might have to wiggle it side-to-side in order to get it out.
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Figure 10
   Here's a shot of it removed with that big fat o-ring on the end.
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Figure 11
   The motor that I bought for this project happened to be a 1999 996 3.4L engine, which was the first year of the 996.  As such, this engine only had a throttle body that was controlled by a cable attached to the accelerator pedal.  Starting in 2000, they went to an electronically controlled throttle (sometimes called E-gas) where the opening of the throttle body is controlled by a servo motor.  For this engine, I had to purchase a later-style throttle body, and intake plenum to match.
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Figure 12
   Here's a shot of the engine with the cable-controlled throttle body removed.  There are two connectors to remove here, the idle control valve and the throttle position switch.
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Figure 13
   This particular sensor had me fooled for quite a while.  This is actually two sensors in one - an oil level indicator combined with an oil temperature sender.  Hence the four wires that are attached to it.  I can't quite remember why right now, but at one time I was tracking down all of the sensors on the 996 motor to make sure they matched the ones on the Boxster motor, and for the life of me,  I could not find the temp sensor.  It was combined with this sensor (which is really, really long), hence the confusion (part number 996-606-150-00).  Unplug this from the wire harness.
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Figure 14
   Here's a shot of the knock sensor on the right side of the motor (as it sits in a 996).  Unplug this from the wire harness.
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Figure 15
   This plastic piece holds a portion of the 996 engine wire harness.  Remove this and discard it.  You will have to clip a zip tie that holds the wire harness to the plastic retainer.
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Figure 16
   This clear plastic connector is what connects to the clutch of the air conditioning compressor.  It should be disconnected from everything, as the compressor stays in the car.
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Figure 17
   This is a water temperature sensor on the rear of the engine (as it sits in the 996).  Unplug this from the wire harness.
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Figure 18
   This wire leads to the solenoid which controls the camshaft timing advance (Vario-Cam).  Also note, the engine wire harness ground that must be disconnected too (brown wire - disconnect this too).
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Figure 19
   This is the camshaft position sensor (hall effect).  There are two camshafts, and thus two of these sensors that need to be unplugged from the 996 engine wire harness.  They are on opposite corners of the engine.
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Figure 20
   Here's a good shot of the right side of the engine (as it sits in the 996) with a bunch of the wires disconnected from the wire harness.
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Figure 21
   Rear shot of the engine (996 rear).  Still tons of stuff to remove and change over.
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Figure 22
   This photo shows the bolts that need to be removed prior to you removing the cast metal bracket that holds on the side mounts for the 996 engine.
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Figure 23
   Here's the plug to the flywheel sensor.  Unplug this from the wire harness.
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Figure 24
   Here's another shot of the camshaft timing advance solenoid plug.
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Figure 25
   This shot shows me loosening up the intake manifold bolts so that I can remove that annoying cast metal bracket (shown at the bottom of the photo).
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